Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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While DC had the character when it purchased the Charlton heroes, the rights reverted back to creator Pete Morisi and his estate who licensed Thunderbolt to Dynamite in the 2000s.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

Pardon my ignorance folks, but I thought Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt was at DC when they bought ownership of all the Charlton heroes back in the 1980s before the original Crisis On Infinite Earths.

So how did the character wind up at Dynamite?

Oh. Thanks Phillip. I didn't know that.

But, what about the rest of the Charlton heroes? Does DC still own them? Because they've hardly done anything with most of the characters lately.

Blue Beetle (Ted Cord) is in Heroes In Crisis. How he came back to life, I don't know!

Captain Atom was a New 52 book, I think.

With Doomsday Clock still going on, I doubt that DC will use the Charlton heroes any time soon.

Phillip, et al.

I knew about the Captain Atom New 52 attempt.

The rest is news to me.

But I'm in the same boat with a lot of other comic book fans wondering what (if anything) DC will do with the Justice Society and the Legion of Superheroes once Doomsday Clock is over.

For me, it won't be a question of just who the creative teams are, but what their approach will be as well, especially on the JSA.

"I didn't know anything about the original Captain Marvel until the Roy Thomas Captain Marvel issues."

I'm pretty sure my first exposure was Kurtzman & Wood's "Superduperman" parody from the MAD comic book (reprinted in an early '70s MAD annual).

EDIT: Or, no... it could have been the Whiz Comics #2 treasury edition. It would have been whichever came out first.


EDIT: I just realized I never got that "Billy Spafon" joke until just now.

INVADERS #4: I don’t hate this EYKIW as much as I would have a couple of years ago. In fact, I don’t hate it at all. I miss a clear delineation point in the Marvel Universe (such as Crisis on Infinite Earths at DC), but eventually one must come to accept that this is no longer the universe in which Bucky died in 1945, Toro died in 1968, and the Sub-Mariner went missing from 1955-1962. In the MU as it now stands, Prince Namor eventually regained his lost memories, with the help of Professor Xavier, and travelled with him for a time (prior to 2012’s First X-Men EYKIW). Namor eventually lost his memories again, until revived by the Human Torch in Fantastic Four #4 in whatever year that story now took place.

STRANGERS IN PARADISE XXV OMNIBUS: I read this in a single sitting over the weekend and, man, did I miss a lot reading it initially in periodic monthly installments! This is so my favorite “independent” title. I like it more than Paper Girls, more than Stray Bullets. When I said 9regarding the last issue) that I hoped that wasn’t the end, I didn’t know about Terry Moore’s follow-up series, Five Years: “One story. One world. Five years. That’s all we’ve got. Unless they can stop it.” Strangers in Paradise is basically reality-based; Echo is science fiction; Rachel Rising is fantasy; and Motor Girl is what it is. Moore brings these four diverse series together in XXV and creates the “Terryverse”; Five Years continues it.

By the end of XXV, the government has gotten ahold of a formula which could destroy all life. We’ve got five years, tops. If you’ve never read Strangers in Paradise before (or if you have, but haven’t read the other series), XXV really is a good jumping on point. You won’t be able to appreciate fully how well it fits together, but you’ll be able to appreciate it enough. It’s a fairly quick ready, but fascinating, gripping. It will draw you in and won’t let go.

EARLY BATMAN: I’m continuing to make may way through Kane/Finger Batman for as long as the mood strikes me. I’m usually a “Superman” guy, but I’m digging these early Batman stories more than I did the last time I read through them, which was in 2004. (I remember because my arm was in a sling and I had a difficult time holding the book and turning the pages.) There is a lot more continuity to early Batman than there is to early Superman. Maybe that’s the appeal. Finger knows when to shut up and give Kane a wordless panel to set the mood, and Kane knows how to use one to its best advantage.

My very first comic, Justice League of America #103 (D'72), had Superman confronted by an enchanted Rutlander dressed as Captain Marvel! Supes' thoughts were very meta! After that, my next exposure to the Big Red Cheese was either a SHAZAM! 100 Pager or tabloid!

Jeff of Earth-J said:

INVADERS #4: I don’t hate this EYKIW as much as I would have a couple of years ago. In fact, I don’t hate it at all. I miss a clear delineation point in the Marvel Universe (such as Crisis on Infinite Earths at DC), but eventually one must come to accept that this is no longer the universe in which Bucky died in 1945, Toro died in 1968, and the Sub-Mariner went missing from 1955-1962. In the MU as it now stands, Prince Namor eventually regained his lost memories, with the help of Professor Xavier, and travelled with him for a time (prior to 2012’s First X-Men EYKIW). Namor eventually lost his memories again, until revived by the Human Torch in Fantastic Four #4 in whatever year that story now took place.

Wait, what? Namor and Professor X did WHAT? WHAT WHAT WHAT? Criminy.

I"m enjoying everyone's "first Captain Marvel memories" stories. Back in the pre-Internet days we all had to learn things helter-skelter, so we all have different stories about how we first heard of this or that. In my case, I still sremember the time and place of my epiphany, when various bits and pieces of information came together as "Captain Marvel" in my mind. It was quite a revelation to my 9-year-old brain. Also: Pirates of Penzance cape. What's up with that?

But by the time Shazam! #1 came out in 1973, I was a Captain Marvel expert, thanks to the Steranko History of Comics, which came out in 1970. I could have just waited a year or two for Steranko to tell me who Captain Marvel was, instead of figuring it out.

Jeff, the GCD doesn't list any reprints of "Superduperman" between 1954 and 1981, but it is clearly wrong. If you're right that Superduperman was included in the Famous First Edition F-4, the Treasury reprint of Whiz #2, that would have been 1974 or '75. And I could swear anyway that I had read most or all of the comic-book size issues of MAD before the DC Archives series, so there must have been a collection or series of reprints in the '60s or '70s that I don't remember. (Russ Cochran, according to GCD, wasn't until 1986.)

Anybody have any idea where I (and Jeff) saw "Superduperman" before the '80s? "Starchie?" "Batboy and Reuben?" I swear, I can rattle these stories off from memory, and can repeat most of the jokes, so I must have read them somewhere pretty early on. (My memory of the '80s is spotty and I don't remember a damn thing from the '90s. I wasn't much enjoying comic book collecting then.)

And speaking of Captain Marvel homages, there was also Zha-vam from late '60s Action Comics.

As to Peter Cannon, Philip beat me to the punch. My understanding is that Thunderbolt was always owned by Pete Morisi, and then his heirs when he died. That's why Thunderbolt has appeared so infrequently. Was he in Agents of LAW? I'm trying to remember if he ever crossed over with any other character, because if he did, DC can't reprint those stories.

Thunderbolt is still in the Crisis On Infinite Earths collection, even though they portray him as another speedster like the Flash.

I've read a lot of the earlier MAD parodies way before the 80s in various paperbacks from the 60s-70s, possible even in MAD annuals. Amazed that there's no reference to them!

I do own the Complete First Six Issues of MAD collection and 1997-98's Tales Calculated To Drive You MAD magazines which reprinted three issues in each.

I reread the first Riddler story in the Detective Comics anniversary hardcover, and it introduces the my favorite Batman villain with a character flaw that subsequent stories have deviated from: The Riddler wins at puzzles & riddles not so much because he's smarter than everyone, but because HE CHEATS. As a kid, he cheated on a jigsaw puzzle assignment, and would make bets with impossible bent-nail puzzles, switching them out with other ones through sleight of hand to "prove" they were possible. There's another carney game he wins at because he can see some otherwise invisible markings using special glasses. (Although, if he's running a carnival game, of course it's rigged!)

His cheating transforms, though, when he faces Batman and Robin. He gives them riddles with legitimate answers, but stages his crimes at places with a secret double meaning that the answers could have. That's much more like the Riddler we know today, but I think it's important to remember that he didn't get so good at riddles because he's as smart as Batman...he did it by cheating, so he could seem cleverer than he is. And in the final showdown in a maze of glass, he cheats a final time by installing a glass pane over the actual exit once he escapes, trapping Batman and Robin inside. It's a good encapsulation of his character -- he presents challenges as fair play, when in truth they're anything but.  

Probably where I saw them. In the 70s (and possibly earlier), Mad's "Super Specials" sometimes came with a mini-comic inserted that reprinted stuff from the 1950s comic-book version of Mad. I can state for a fact that one of these contained "Superduperman," which I read before I had any real idea who Captain Marvel had been!

Captain Comics said:

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Anybody have any idea where I (and Jeff) saw "Superduperman" before the '80s? "Starchie?" "Batboy and Reuben?" I swear, I can rattle these stories off from memory, and can repeat most of the jokes, so I must have read them somewhere pretty early on. (My memory of the '80s is spotty and I don't remember a damn thing from the '90s. I wasn't much enjoying comic book collecting then.)

This is the first (of several) specials to include mini versions of Mad comic books from the '50s. "Superduperman" was the first story in the supplement.

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