Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Daredevil #99 did no one any favors!

i got from the library the trade paperback of Zatanna, This was a solo series launched in 2010 by Paul Dini that petered out after 16 issues. I recall being intrigued at the time, but with comics prices being what they are, my curiosity wasn't strong enough to add it to my roster.

Maybe I should have. Zatanna the title gives Zatanna the character something she hasn't had through her long existence in the DC Universe: a life. Here, she's a resident of San Francisco, a stage magician who is a superhero on the side, but would rather not be known for that. She uses real magic in her act, but spends a lot of time rehearsing non-magical tricks and illusions for her act.

She also has a frustrating social life. We see her on dates with guys who think she should use her magic to get out of paying the tab at restaurants, which irks her. And she contends with a fair number of magical threats.

It was an entertaining series, even though Dini wasn't the writer all the way to the end. 

I liked Zatanna too Clark, but thought her title and a whole lot of other series were canceled with Flashpoint and the resulting "New 52" on the horizon.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I liked Zatanna too Clark, but thought her title and a whole lot of other series were canceled with Flashpoint and the resulting "New 52" on the horizon.

Maybe so. I don't care about any of that. 

I'm continuing my reread of Sandman Mystery Theatre with The Scorpion, from issues 17-20. While I never forgot how much I loved this series, it's been a while since I've read it... and it's refreshing to see I was right in holding it in such high esteem. One of the best series Vertigo ever produced. I'm sorry that it hasn't all been collected. 

Man, I need to get around to reading this whole series. I never have. I think I've only read a couple of arcs, actually.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I'm continuing my reread of Sandman Mystery Theatre with The Scorpion, from issues 17-20. While I never forgot how much I loved this series, it's been a while since I've read it... and it's refreshing to see I was right in holding it in such high esteem. One of the best series Vertigo ever produced. I'm sorry that it hasn't all been collected. 

There's such a slow build to Wes and Dian's relationship and partnership... it's such a pleasure to read!

I need to re-read this series, too. I've read the whole thing, but I was collecting the issues from bargain bins and read some of the arcs out of order.

I find the patience of the book remarkable. I'm 20 issues in, and Wesley has only just resolved to tell Dian he's the Sandman...not realizing she's just figured it out. 20 issues to get to this point! These days, this would be the ending of issue 6.

HISTORY OF THE MARVEL UNIVERSE #1: The first issue of this series is exactly what was promised: a guide to the MU which is neither Handbook nor Marvel Saga. Having said that, the series it most resembles is Marvel Saga, but Marvel Saga done right. For those of you who may not know or remember, Marvel Saga was a comprehensive (mostly) chronological retelling of… well, of the “Marvel saga”… from the beginning using a mishmash of artwork from throughout the history of the company, supplemented by captions printed in text (rather than hand-lettered). The result was a curious patchwork, but not a very interesting read.

The new History of the Marvel Universe takes much the same concept (within the framing device of Galactus relating the story to an adult Franklin Richards billions of years in the future), but illustrated with new original work and written by Mark Waid. The package is really two comics in one. In addition to the story itself, each issue is supplemented by annotations, very similar to the original Marvel Saga, i.e. spot illustrations from throughout Marvel’s history and magazine text. History of the Marvel Universe has one huge advantage over Marvel Saga, though, and that is that it list sources by title, issue number and year, making it an excellent source for doing research. I know most of the “old” sources, but many are recent enough that I am unfamiliar with them.

Here are a few things I learned that I didn’t know before:

Tuk the Caveboy (from Golden Age Captain America Comics) is now considered to be an Inhuman.

Tyrranus’s minions are descended from a former Deviant slave race.

And, from the annotations…

Most of what we know of the ‘Abstracts’ is gleaned from the first few pages of Quasar #20.

One thing I was hoping for that I didn’t get was a differentiation between the Titanian and Uranian branches of the Eternals, but that’s a minor quibble at best, considering the wealth of information that is included. Issue #2 will take us into the 20th century. I’m hoping for definitive timelines for Sub-Mariner and Captain America between WWII and the modern heroic age, and I’m curious to see is John Byrne’s “Lost Generation” of heroes will be included.

Yeah, I sprang for that, too. I also wonder if the "Lost Generation" will be included or not.  I wonder where my copy of the "History of the DC Universe" is, I'd like to take it out and compare it.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

HISTORY OF THE MARVEL UNIVERSE #1: The first issue of this series is exactly what was promised: a guide to the MU which is neither Handbook nor Marvel Saga. Having said that, the series it most resembles is Marvel Saga, but Marvel Saga done right. For those of you who may not know or remember, Marvel Saga was a comprehensive (mostly) chronological retelling of… well, of the “Marvel saga”… from the beginning using a mishmash of artwork from throughout the history of the company, supplemented by captions printed in text (rather than hand-lettered). The result was a curious patchwork, but not a very interesting read.

The new History of the Marvel Universe takes much the same concept (within the framing device of Galactus relating the story to an adult Franklin Richards billions of years in the future), but illustrated with new original work and written by Mark Waid. The package is really two comics in one. In addition to the story itself, each issue is supplemented by annotations, very similar to the original Marvel Saga, i.e. spot illustrations from throughout Marvel’s history and magazine text. History of the Marvel Universe has one huge advantage over Marvel Saga, though, and that is that it list sources by title, issue number and year, making it an excellent source for doing research. I know most of the “old” sources, but many are recent enough that I am unfamiliar with them.

Here are a few things I learned that I didn’t know before:

Tuk the Caveboy (from Golden Age Captain America Comics) is now considered to be an Inhuman.

Tyrranus’s minions are descended from a former Deviant slave race.

And, from the annotations…

Most of what we know of the ‘Abstracts’ is gleaned from the first few pages of Quasar #20.

One thing I was hoping for that I didn’t get was a differentiation between the Titanian and Uranian branches of the Eternals, but that’s a minor quibble at best, considering the wealth of information that is included. Issue #2 will take us into the 20th century. I’m hoping for definitive timelines for Sub-Mariner and Captain America between WWII and the modern heroic age, and I’m curious to see is John Byrne’s “Lost Generation” of heroes will be included.

PLANET OF THE NERDS #3: My favorite of the Ahoy! Comics titles.

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