Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Oh, wow! I remember seeing ads for Psycho but never reading it. That would be a cool back issue bin find!

I told my DVR to record the series, but so far I only see the single episode this Saturday, which is supposedly episode 3.

Philip Portelli said:

TCM is showing the Terry and the Pirates movie serial every Saturday morning!

Thanks, Jeff! I'm hoping to continue with the IDW volumes, since they're so nice on my shelf. We'll see how long they go for; if IDW goes under for some reason, I could see someone else wanting to continue the Library of American Comics label. It's a pretty great name, and the volumes they put out are quality products. 

I don't know if I could run a Steve Canyon group, too, but maybe I'll start something when I go back to Month 1...tomorrow. An then tackle years three and four, which I've just read, when we get to it again (although maybe not with me rereading them again, and I might not want to lose momentum to volume 3; I'll cross that bridge when I get to it, I guess.)

Jeff of Earth-J said:

“I'm still reading a month of Steve Canyon… every day.”

That’s my pace, too, when I read continuity strips.

“…then I'll flash back to volume 1”

My “Little Orphan Annie” read has hit a stall. I’m this close to joining you.

“There's probably 11 or 12 more volumes to go…”

I’ve wondered about that (since the binding spell out “S-T-E-V-E C-A-N-Y-O-N”).

“Who knows whether we'll ever get to them…“

Whether IDW will be solvent to publish them? I wonder about that, too. Every time I read something IDW related it’s about how close they are to bankruptcy. I wish them the best, but if they do go under, I hope another publisher picks up when they left off. But in today’s environment, like you said, “Who knows?”

I have a lot of Steve Canyon (published by Kitchen Sink Press) duplicated in my collection. I really need to cull it, so if you’re interested, let me know and I’m sure we can work something out.

There is at least one other board member I know of who has quite a bit of the early Steve Canyon in his collection. If we could convince him to read along with us, we could get a good discussion going. (I don’t want to run it, though, but I’ll commit to following along and commenting.)

"I'm hoping to continue with the IDW volumes, since they're so nice on my shelf."

Understood. (Obviously, because that's what i did.)

Lets see, this weekend I finished the GA Sandman Archives (then read "Sand & Stars" from Starman #20-23), continued the SA Hawkman Archives, read Gold Key Dark Shadows v4 (reprinting #23-28; one to go!), and another Tintin story. ("Red Sea Sharks").

I read The Terrifics #26 today, and it really took me back to the Bronze Age. This had everything in it--Simon and Sapphire Stagg, who of course have been around since the beginning of this series; a new team-up project between Terrifitech and Stagg Industries; some deception on Stagg's part, but for a good-ish reason; and the introduction of the T-Council at the end.

What made this book feel so Bronze-y was the fact that it does not take itself all that seriously, despite the subject matter introduced at the beginning of the issue. The dialogue has just the right amount of exposition to make it feel throwback, and the melodrama reminds me of late 70's Avengers.

I saw where this book is going to continue in digital-only starting with issue 30, and I sure hope it lasts there for a long time. This book will be a long-remembered gem waiting to be unearthed by fans for decades.

FIRST ISSUE SPECIAL: Okay, I haven't acyually read this new collection yet, but I'm eager to read it. I have most (but not all) of the originals, and I an keen to rank them. I haven't yet decided to rank them best to worst, worst to best, or by release date. Decisions, decisions...

FIVE YEARS #10: I haven't actually read this one yet, either, but I thought I'd mention that if your LCS ordered via regular channels it hasn't shipped yet (also, it will have the regular cover); but if your LCS ordered directly from Terry Moore, not only did it ship today, but the cover features the cast wearing N-95 masks.



Jeff of Earth-J said:

FIRST ISSUE SPECIAL: Okay, I haven't acyually read this new collection yet, but I'm eager to read it. I have most (but not all) of the originals, and I an keen to rank them. I haven't yet decided to rank them best to worst, worst to best, or by release date. Decisions, decisions...

FIVE YEARS #10: I haven't actually read this one yet, either, but I thought I'd mention that if your LCS ordered via regular channels it hasn't shipped yet (also, it will have the regular cover); but if your LCS ordered directly from Terry Moore, not only did it ship today, but the cover features the cast wearing N-95 masks.

I read FIVE YEARS #10 last night. A back cover illustration of the tpb features the same cover but without the masks. I don't know what the cover of the "standard" version of #10 will be. Look under the issue number, though: it says "FINAL ISSUE"! What!? This series is supposed to detail the five year countdown to armageddon and I expected it to last, well... five years. Along with The Walking Dead, here is another series to come to a sudden and unexpected end.

Apparently, he announced it back in January.  It's in the first two minutes, but he doesn't seem to say why.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

I read FIVE YEARS #10 last night. A back cover illustration of the tpb features the same cover but without the masks. I don't know what the cover of the "standard" version of #10 will be. Look under the issue number, though: it says "FINAL ISSUE"! What!? This series is supposed to detail the five year countdown to armageddon and I expected it to last, well... five years. Along with The Walking Dead, here is another series to come to a sudden and unexpected end.

"Apparently, he announced it back in January."

I did not know that. Thanks for the clip.

From 1986: WaRP Graphics' Blood of the Innocent with the meeting of Dracula and Jack the Ripper by Rickey Shanklin, Mark Wheatley and Marc Hempel. Real world events are given a gothic twist as the Lord of the Vampires is almost by default the protagonist of the story. "Jack" is once more a syphilis-deranged Prince Albert Victor, the Duke of Clarence and Queen Victoria's grandson but called "Eddy".

The artwork is both simple yet immersive and the tale filled with tragedy, coverups and horror!

According to some PR DC sent me, The Terrifics is canceled, with the last three issues to be released digital-only. What a lovely gesture to those who supported it in print, and now can't get the whole series in the same format. Well, maybe the digital issues will be included in a TPB someday.

I read Pre-Code Classics: Space Adventures Volume One, and have little to say about it. The art quality is a bit higher than the Charlton I knew in the '60s, but that's a pretty low bar. It's standard sci-fi of the period, with long-outdated science and standard adventures stories without much imagination.

I read Timely's Greatest: The Golden Age Simon & Kirby -- or rather, the parts that I hadn't read in other reprints, which wasn't much. Nothing new to report.

I read Timely's Greatest: The Golden Age Human Torch by Carl Burgos and don't remember anything about it. I was trying to read only the stories that I hadn't read already in Marvel Masterworks, but discovered that I couldn't tell the difference between the ones I had read and the ones I hadn't. Despite having a lead character that is on fire, it's all pretty pedestrian. The Torch's arch-enemy (one of the few to repeat) was a criminal called The Parrot, who wore a parrot mask on his head, complete with beak. Not exactly awe-inspiring.

I read Marvel Masters of Suspense: Steve Ditko Volume Two. It was classic Ditko, but the techniques he employs here aren't as experimental as the ones in the previous volume. I guess at this point in his career, he had decided what techniques worked or that he liked or were just easy to do, and discarded the rest. I'm not complaining; this era is probably Ditko's peak as an artist.

I read all four Snowpiercer graphic novels available. (Two more are coming, one in August and another in summer of next year.) One of the fun aspects of reading European SF as opposed to U.S. stuff is the cultural difference. U.S. stories generally have a strong protagonist/hero, are more linear, care less about class and are, by and large, more optimistic in the ability of one man to change the system. European stories, by contrast, are generally the reverse. I'll have more to say in an upcoming column.

I do have an observation about the first book (Snowpiercer Vol. 1: The Escape) that is a spoiler. Skip this part if you don't want to know. But here goes:

The lead character, Proloff, is joined by Adeline, a human rights activist, as he moves up the train, car by car, thereby letting us, the reader, explore the train as he does. But near the engine, the two are trapped in a car that is exposed to the outside, and both immediately freeze. Proloff is rescued before he dies, but it was, the rescuer says, too late for Adeline.

So, can I say she was fridged? :)

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