Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Looking forward to Wizzywig. I put in an order for my library, but it hasn't arrived yet. I've got a "library lag" going on the two things I read this morning. Fables Vol. 17: Inherit the Wind finds Bigby & Snow's cubs being tested to decide which will become the next North Wind, while Bufkin leads a ragtag group fomenting revolution in Oz, and the rest of the Fables return to the Farm and find it relatively untouched by the late Mister Dark. I'm only two issues in, but there's already plenty going on. 

The other read was the long-awaited The Walking Dead Vol. 17: Something to Fear, which includes the famous issue #100 that I had to avoid all discussion of at the time. That issue was indeed horrific, but in the context of the series I'd have to say that it's not especially unique: basically it's The Governor turned up a notch. The entire story arc in this collection is surprising, though. The previous collection introduced a new walled community called the Hilltop, and a new villain named Negan, who leads a protection racket called the Saviors  We're expecting Rick and the group to plan an attack on the new threat, endure some complications and losses, and ultimately be victorious. But it turns out to be considerably more complicated than that. The Saviors are a much larger group than expected, and they are absolutely ruthless. Rick makes the surprising decision not to resist them, fearing the loss of his entire group. But he sends their new Hilltop ally Paul out to scout out the Saviors as the collection closes, so he clearly has another long term plan.

I picked up a few graphic novels and trade paperback collections from the libary recently.

One was Too Cool to Be Forgotten by Alex Robinson. It's about a guy who undergoes hypnosis in order to kick his smoking habit, and undergoes a past-life regression (shades of Professor Carter Nichols!), thus finding himself back in the early '80s as his teenage self! Or, rather, as his middle-aged self in his teenage body.

It's pretty well written, as it captures all of the confusing aspects of the situation and all the worries someone finding himself in such a circumstance would have. Such as: How does this end? When does this end? Am I going to have to relive my entire life? How can I relive my entire life and not do something that will change the future? How can I be a middle-aged man and pretend to be a teenager for my entire life? And so on.

He soon realizes that he's come to the past to the week before he went to a party where he smoked his first cigarette, and figures not doing so will send him back to his own time and body. But it's not quite that simple; there's another problem in his past he has to confront.

I enjoyed this one, for all the reasons you mention. Robinson packs all that content into a pretty short book, too. I thought my non-comic reading wife might like it, even. But I don't think she's read it yet.


ClarkKent_DC said:

I picked up a few graphic novels and trade paperback collections from the libary recently.

One was Too Cool to Be Forgotten by Alex Robinson. It's about a guy who undergoes hypnosis in order to kick his smoking habit, and undergoes a past-life regression (shades of Professor Carter Nichols!), thus finding himself back in the early '80s as his teenage self! Or, rather, as his middle-aged self in his teenage body.

The conclusion of "Inherit the Wind" brings the search for the new North Wind to a surprising conclusion, although the story is far from over. The other ongoing threads don't get the same: Bufkin's adventures in Oz end with a cliffhanger; life at the Farm resumes normality in time for Christmas; and in Fabletown the former Nurse Spratt waits for the return of the Fables with some sort of revenge in mind. The Christmas issue features Rose Red in a Dickens variant: they were bound to get to that eventually. She makes a pledge to a ghost who sure looks like Boy Blue, although she doesn't see it. The final "In Those Days" issue is a collection of short stories about Fables past, illustrated by several interesting guest artists (Rick Leonardi, Ron Randall, P. Craig Russell, Zander Cannon, Jim Fern, Ramon Bachs, and Adam Hughes). One of them tells the story of how Fabletown was ignored by the Empire for so long, a clever bit of back story.

Zatanna: Everyday Magic was written by Paul Dini and illustrated by Rick Mays (with colors by Brian Miller). It's kind of a cute version of Zatanna and John Constantine, which makes it an odd choice for a Vertigo one-shot. Although it does earn the Mature Readers tag by virtue of all the swearing and sex in it. Zatanna spends most of the story trying to have a normal everyday life, finally concluding that she's only really at home on the stage. The big magical adventure comes from having to rescue Constantine from a curse laid on him by a rival female magician (due to a romantic entanglement, of course).

I really need to get caught up with the Fables world. As I said earlier in the week, I still need to read the previous three trades plus Werewolves in the Heartland, and I noticed that the next trade is out this week.

Here's what I did read today:

Superior Spider-Man #1

Dan Slott and Ryan Stegman showed Doc Ock/Spidey battling the new Sinister Six (which really bothers Doc Ock!), and we get to see the new, snobbish Peter Parker treating his boss as a perceived henchman, Mary Jane as his doll, and yet still being somehow somewhat of a hero. There are some serious spoilers I'm holding back, but they are hardly surprising.

The End Times of Bram and Ben #1

This is from Image, written by James Asmus and Jim Festante with art by Rem Broo. First, the art reminds me of that in Chew. That's about all on that front. The story is kind of a refreshing take on the rapture, and the writing was interesting and kept my attention. I liked that one of the protagonists (the main one) was a teacher in an elementary school, was a guy, and was likeable. Still, the concept won't bring me back next month.

Mars Attacks Kiss #1

I bought this for some reason. It takes place before Kiss is even a band. It was okay. The art reminded me of Philip Bond, but the story was...I don't know. I've never read Kiss in comics that wasn't in an Archie crossover, and now I know why.

Comeback #1-2

This is another Image title by Ed Brisson and Michael Walsh, neither of whom I've read before, and it was really good. It's about a time-travel corporation who gets paid the big bucks for trips into the past. It's illegal, and we find out quickly that it's a pretty under-handed operation at that. The end of the first issue made me say, "Oh jeez!" and grab the next one immediately. The art reminds me of Who is Jake Ellis?

Jinn Rise #1 from IDW. Basically it's Genies vs Aliens. The first issue is fast paced. However not a whole lot of background on why all of this is happening. May check out the next issue to see where it goes.

Mara #1 by Brian Wood. This was interesting not sure if I'll stick with it or not. This takes place in the future and focuses on the best volleyball player in the world who develops some kind of powers.

I haven't heard of either of those, Jason. Mara sounds like something I should give to my cadet teacher, who has a full ride at Georgia Tech next year on a volleyball scholarship!

Jason Marconnet said:

Jinn Rise #1 from IDW. Basically it's Genies vs Aliens. The first issue is fast paced. However not a whole lot of background on why all of this is happening. May check out the next issue to see where it goes.

Mara #1 by Brian Wood. This was interesting not sure if I'll stick with it or not. This takes place in the future and focuses on the best volleyball player in the world who develops some kind of powers.

Venom vol. 1, I've never been much of a fan, but I had heard some good things with Flash Thompson as the new Venom. This first volume was okay, but I doubt I will be back for the second volume (unless I can get it super cheap).  Too much happens without much explanation. Like in issue 2: how did Kraven the Hunter get to the Savage Land? How did he find Venom there? Why is he hunting him?

Also, XIII volume 1. The Day of the Black Sun, a series clearly inspired by the Bourne Identity. The first volume was good enough though. I read the first issue when it was published by Alias amd then forgot to order the later comics. Cinebook is now reprinting the entire series, it was first published in Belgium and began in the '80s. I think  they are still original stories though.

Another book I got from the library was Skinwalker. It was a collection of a four-issue miniseries from Oni Press about 10 years ago. I found issue #2 in the quarter bin ages ago, and it was nice to have the whole story.

The story is set on a Native American reservation, and follows the adventures of Ann Adakai, a Navajo Tribal Police Officer, and Greg Haworth, an FBI agent, who both find themselves trying to catch an odd serial killer. The killer has misused and perverted a tribal ritual known as skinwalking -- skinning an animal and wearing the pelt in order to assume its guise and abilities. Our killer has found a way to make it work by skinning people. Yeah, it's gruesome, but not especially gory; at least, no worse than the average issue of Hellblazer. (Good thing, too, as that's about my limit on the scale of unpleasant-to-look-at.)

Being the fan of police procedurals that I am, I liked this series; it really got the kind of antagonism between cops and feds that I've learned exists, and it captures the world of the Navajo very comprehensively as well as FBI culture which grounds the series and is key to making it work.

Wow, this sounds pretty similar to Scalped.

Maybe so; I never read Scalped

The thing here is, our serial killer has some kind of magic at work so that, when he dons the skin of the person, he becomes that person for a while ... but it doesn't last, which is why he has to kill again and again. That figures into the mystery, too.

I think that was also the first episode of The Dresden Files.

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