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I’m not quite finished reading MMW Daredevil v13, but I’m going to be offline for a week so I’ll post what I have.

MMW DAREDEVIL v13: This volume reprints issues #133-143, Annual #4 and Ghost Rider #20. The stories are by Marv Wolfman & Bob Brown (mostly). I am reading them all for the very first time.

#133 features real life illusionist Uri Geller, who claimed to have genuine supernatural powers, which is the way Marvel presented him here. Stage magician James Randi, who routinely debunked such claims, criticized Marvel for this approach. Also in #133, the source of the false TV footage of Foggy, JFK and Robert Kennedy is revealed. Decades before such things would become possible, Marv Wolfman foresaw the possibility of “fake news” being created using a computer program invented by a scientist employed by the Jester.

#134 begins with TV news footage of Daredevil gunning down three police officers in front of city hall. Also the Torpedo returns, and the villain this issue is the chameleon. The romance between Matt Murdock and Heather Glenn heats up. Meanwhile, the Jester manipulates footage of Daredevil from a telethon for muscular dystrophy into a threat against the city. Foggy is prevented from seeing Maxwell Glenn, Heather’s slumlord father, by his personal assistant. Foggy is representing Glenn’s tenants, but Heather knows nothing about it.

#135 begins with a three page mock-up of the Daily Bugle serving as intro/recap. The Jester frames Daredevil for his own murder. DD is take to prison but breaks out and is captured by… the Jester!? Wha—?

In #136, drawn by guest artist John Buscema, Daredevil easily disproves the charges against him. The situation moves into a ridiculous extreme as President Gerald Ford appears on TV and declares that Daredevil is to be shot on sight. Daredevil is overcome by a mob and put on trial in Times Square. In #137 (also by John Buscema), Karen Page is kidnapped. If the Jester is intended to be Marvel’s version of the Joker, then this issue’s “murder maze” swipes a gimmick from Mister Miracle, as daredevil must escape from a booby-trapped 10-storey building.

The Masterworks also includes a two-page prologue to the upcoming crossover from Ghost Rider #19 by Tony Isabella and Frank Robbins. In Daredevil #138 and Ghost Rider #20, Marv Wolfman is joined by artist John Byrne in a tale featuring Stunt Master and Death’s Head (Karen Page’s dead father identity) who ends up being Death Stalker.

This story leads into Daredevil Annual #4, scripted by Chris Claremont with art by George Tuska, featuring the Black Panther and the Sub-Mariner. DD fights Subby once, twice, while the Panther operates solo. DD & the Panther team-up, the DD fights Subby again by himself. Subby leaves and DD fight the Black Panther, then they make nice. Subby remembers meeting Daredevil once before (although they fought twice), and he doesn’t remember Matt Mudock at all (although he once represented him in court).

MMW MARVEL-TWO-IN-ONE v4: This volume covers the time when Editor-in-Chief Archie Goodwin was transitioning to Jim Shooter. Goodwin’s tenure was the last under which the EiC edited the entire line himself. Shooter instituted a group of line editors who would each oversee a “family” of titles. With issue #42, Roger Stern took up the editorship of the group of titles which included Marvel-Two-In-One.

The volume begins with Jim Starlin’s often-reprinted conclusion to the “Thanos Saga” from Avengers Annual #7 and Marvel-Two-In-One Annual #2. (It has been reprinted as part of the Avengers series, the Captain Marvel series, the Warlock series, the “Thanos” series, and on its own. Now it is part of the Marvel-Two-In-One series as well.) It’s a good story; it deserves to be reprinted.

The volume also includes issues #37-46 and Annual #3. #42-43, the first issues under group editor Roger Stern (as mentioned above), introduces Project: PEGASUS: Potential Energy Group/Alternate Sources/United States. (One would imagine a UK-based branch would be Project: PEGASUK.). More on that next volume. (PEGAUS, that is, not PEGASUK.) The volume is rounded out with a trio of stories featuring Captain Marvel, the Hulk and Hercules… stories I have been aware of for some time but have never read.

I remember smiling at the Project Pegasus Easter egg in the 1st Avengers movie.

Not the best period for Marvel Two-In-One with a bizarre three-parter involving the Mad Thinker, a two-parter that featured Idi Amin and the least of the Thing/Hulk battles with a great punchline!

Except for the Starlin and the Project: Pegasus issues, I haven't read any of these.

SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE #2: Issue #1 ended with Clark Kent joining the Navy. The first half of #2 deals with him training to become a Navy Seal, and the second half deals with Lori Lemaris. Clark is an excellent marksman, and is being groomed to be a sniper. He is also being trained how to kill with his bare hands and with knives. I'm not real wild about this concept. When he is sent on a mission and accomplishes it without killing when ordered to, he is drummed out with an honorable discharge. I'm not real wild about that concept, either.

Lori Lemaris is more "fishy" than she's ever been depicted before, and her old man is a real piece of work (with incest on his mind). "Atlantis" is located off the cost of San Diego (which is the Pacific Ocean last time I checked). 

If the Superman in the brian Bendis comics is still the one from the pre-Flashpoint DCU, there is no way this origin is his. I would almost be willing to accept that it was the origin of his "Nu52" predecessor, but Grant Morrison went into great detail presenting that Superman's origin. So which "Superman" is this? Until now, Birthright had been my choice for "Most Unnecessary Retelling of Superman's Origin."

I read Underground, a collection of the 2010 five-issue series by Jeff Parker and Steve Lieber. 

It's an environmental thriller set in the claustrophobic cave systems of Kentucky -- basically a chase scene as some criminals pursue some park rangers through the caves. The main characters are likable, the action is thrilling but believable, and the crisp art by Steve Lieber takes us through every step of the action. And oh, man, Ross Chan's colors are terrific: in the caves, lighting is an important factor, and he and Lieber do an excellent job of keeping clear what's seen and unseen. (And the bright spring coloration of the outdoor scenes come as a welcome respite!)

Great book.

I dug up The Marvels Project  by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting from 2009-10. It once again retells the beginnings of the Human Torch, the Sub-Mariner and Captain America, only this time through the eyes of Thomas Halloway, the Golden Age Angel who is not as pivotal to the story as you may think. It does focus a bit more on the "lesser" Timely characters of which there are plenty, including killing off two of them, one which did bother me a little.

Plot points are introduced and dropped. Namor is indeed a mass murderer here though he believes himself justified. He's still unbearable but all is forgiven. The Human Torch strives to be more, well, human and Cap begins to become the beacon of hope he was destined to be.

Unfortunately, the story just ends abruptly. Each issue had some great moments but as a whole, there's no real payoff.

Maybe this could be included if the INVADERS thread, if you guys want.

I understood this was supposed to be the same Superman from The Dark Knight Returns.

How does one get drummed out of the service and still get an honorable discharge? There are other kinds of discharges for people who leave the service under a cloud, yes?


Jeff of Earth-J said:

SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE #2: Issue #1 ended with Clark Kent joining the Navy. The first half of #2 deals with him training to become a Navy Seal, and the second half deals with Lori Lemaris. Clark is an excellent marksman, and is being groomed to be a sniper. He is also being trained how to kill with his bare hands and with knives. I'm not real wild about this concept. When he is sent on a mission and accomplishes it without killing when ordered to, he is drummed out with an honorable discharge. I'm not real wild about that concept, either.

Lori Lemaris is more "fishy" than she's ever been depicted before, and her old man is a real piece of work (with incest on his mind). "Atlantis" is located off the cost of San Diego (which is the Pacific Ocean last time I checked). 

If the Superman in the brian Bendis comics is still the one from the pre-Flashpoint DCU, there is no way this origin is his. I would almost be willing to accept that it was the origin of his "Nu52" predecessor, but Grant Morrison went into great detail presenting that Superman's origin. So which "Superman" is this? Until now, Birthright had been my choice for "Most Unnecessary Retelling of Superman's Origin."

A "General Discharge" is a catch-all for service members not being given a Dishonorable Discharge. It is less than an Honorable Discharge. Back when (not too long ago) they were discharging people for being gay this was the one they would get. If someone was too much trouble but it didn't raise to the level of Dishonorable they would also get a General. I believe this could be fought, but only by demanding a Court Martial. A General Discharge is theoretically better than Dishonorable, but it creates a cloud of suspicion and would make it hard to get a job.

Also, Article 15 of the UCMJ* allows a kind of plea bargain in which one can agree to a fine and/or a reduction in rank without being Court Martialed or discharged. That being said, if Clark Kent accomplished his mission without killing I don't think he would be kicked out.

* Uniform Code of Military Justice 

ClarkKent_DC said:

I understood this was supposed to be the same Superman from The Dark Knight Returns.

How does one get drummed out of the service and still get an honorable discharge? There are other kinds of discharges for people who leave the service under a cloud, yes?

  • ...I've meant to post about a 2001 b&w from Slave Labor Graphics
  • (a company I rather liked back in the day), SPARKS #5, by Lawrence Margot
...That's Lawrence Marvit.

"I understood this was supposed to be the same Superman from The Dark Knight Returns."

Ah. That would make sense. 

MMW DAREDEVIL v13 (con't): #139 features guest artist Sal Buscema and a story about a hemophiliac child, a mad bomber and a missing junkie whose stories become intertwined. #140 is by Bill Mantlo, Sal Buscema, and Klaus Janson, and features the Beetle and the Gladiator. #141 is by Wolfman & Shooter, Kane & Brown, and Mooney. The villain is Bullseye and the story ends with a Batman-style death-trap. (Daredevil escapes with the assistance of Nova.) #142-143 feature Cobra and Mr. Hyde. the volume itself ends with a two-part Torpedo story from Marvel Premiere #39-40. Given what I've already posted about the first half of this volume last week, I think I have already spent too much time on what is a mediocre volume. 

That's the entire series of Daredevil reprinted in "Masterworks" format (so far). The next volume has been solicited for January release. It will breach the Miller era (barely) and I will resume this discussion at that time.

MARVEL COMICS #1000: I enjoyed this one much more than I thought I would. Here's what they did: they took a significant event from each of Marvel's 80 years and dedicated a page which tied to it in some way. the events could be in-story, the introduction of a new character, the publication of a new title, the start of a celebrated creator's run. the vignettes are strictly chronological, although their presentation is. for example, a page featuring the Hulk represents 1959 (the debut if his long-time home, Tales to Astonish), not 1962 (the debut of the character), but is set more-or-less in the "present day" (or close to it). I literally laughed out loud at two of the pages (at one quite loudly). Most of the pages are standalone, but the pages written by Al Ewing tie together and introduce a plot thread which dates back to the Age of Camelot, through the first issue of Marvel Comics, and into a series set to debut next year. Some characters and creators are conspicuous in their absence. 

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