Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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...I read AVENGERS #16 and 17 recently.
Dynamite's THE SIX. MILKION DOLLAR MAN #1.
A 1997 magazine-sized fanzine comic with ama-strips titled SUNVE that I found I. a thrift shop. $3.25 then, 75c now.

IMMORTAL HULK #15: No spoilers here because I know Sensei is tradewaiting, but the story is more explicit about the so-called “Joker-Hulk” introduced a couple of issues back (#12?). He is referred to as the “devil-Hulk” but honestly, it just another, somewhat slightly different persona. The Hulk has been mischaracterized so often over the years, I hesitate to refer to it as a “persona” so much as a “mood” he’s in. He does have a particular mad on concerning the effect nuclear weapons have one the environment, which leads Doc Samson to jokingly refer to him as the “green” hulk.

.. DETECTIVE COMICS #999
Marvel's 3-D reissue of X-MEN #268
Some of AMERICAN SPLENDOR - a twofer movie edition reissue of Iguess the first to AS collections. I'd mostly read later AS. Is there an index anywhere as to whether all the material from the AS comics was printed in the books? Much of REEFER MADNESS, the Craig Yoe-edited anthology from Dark Horse of marijuana exploitation comics.

I read Flash 67 today, the first part of a new Trickster storyline (although the previous issue was a villain spotlight on the Trickster, so it was definitely teeing this storyline up). The art for these past two issues was by Scott Kolins, who used to be the regular artist on Wally's book, and has come back to Flash every now and then since then.

And it got me to thinking about Carmine Infantino. Infantino ended his classic Silver Age run with issue 174, published in 1967; he returned to the book with issue 296, published in 1981. That's 14 years.

Kolins ended his stint as regular artist in volume 2 issue 200 -- in 2003. Granted, he's been back a number of times since then, but it's 16 years later. This Trickster storyline is farther away in time from the end of Blitz (the Zoom story that ended with Wally's baby's being born) than the distance between these two issues. Considering that first, iconic cover was published a couple of years before I was born, it seems like prehistory to me, so it's hard t believe the ensuing years are actually longer. Time flies.

...VENOM #12 yesterday.

GIRAFFES ON HORSEBACK SALAD: This graphic novel is an adaptation of Salvador Dali’s unproduced Marx Brothers movie script. The only think I previously knew about this script is that Groucho deemed that “it wouldn’t play.” After having read it, I have no doubt that he was correct… as a movie in the 1940s, anyway. As a graphic novel, it’s still quite odd. There is quite a bit of supplementary material included in the graphic novel, and I suspect it has been polished quite a bit for publication. I think it might make a fairly decent animated feature in the vein of the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine. I would recommend this only to the truly curious.

The first three issues of the Boom! reboot of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

It's an interesting project, but I doubt I'll read further.

My perception of time has definitely changed as I've gotten older, Rob. My first 20 years in comics seem a LOT longer than recent years, in the sense that Wolverine is, to me, something of a "new" character. The 12 years of X-Men I read pre-Wolverine seem just about as long -- or at least not as short -- as reality would have it. If nothing else, I remember the comics I read in my youth better than the ones I read last week.

As to the topic of this thread, I read Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt #1-3 last night. It's going full Watchmen, with "our" Peter teaming with some folks who seem vaguely familiar. A bird-theme character, a nuclear-powered character ... you get the idea. They are then menaced by an alien invasion that unites the world that they discover is fake -- just like what Ozymandias did in Watchmen. Peter, beause he's Peter, realizes the only person who could pull this off is himself -- and since he didn't do it, it must be a Peter Cannon from another universe. (Unassailable logic!)

And yes, an alt-dimension Peter Cannon IS doing it, and has been doing it to every alternate dimension he runs across, in the hopes of uniting an Earth successfully to live in peace. But since his success rate is 0, he's the greatest mass murderer conceivable with nothing to show for it. 

It's pretty interesting all by itself as a story, and the Watchmen connection is just icing on the cake. The art is OK.



Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

I read Flash 67 today, the first part of a new Trickster storyline (although the previous issue was a villain spotlight on the Trickster, so it was definitely teeing this storyline up). The art for these past two issues was by Scott Kolins, who used to be the regular artist on Wally's book, and has come back to Flash every now and then since then.

And it got me to thinking about Carmine Infantino. Infantino ended his classic Silver Age run with issue 174, published in 1967; he returned to the book with issue 296, published in 1981. That's 14 years.

Kolins ended his stint as regular artist in volume 2 issue 200 -- in 2003. Granted, he's been back a number of times since then, but it's 16 years later. This Trickster storyline is farther away in time from the end of Blitz (the Zoom story that ended with Wally's baby's being born) than the distance between these two issues. Considering that first, iconic cover was published a couple of years before I was born, it seems like prehistory to me, so it's hard t believe the ensuing years are actually longer. Time flies.

At work I've been slowly working my way through the second volume of the Metal Men Archives. While I think the stories are pretty good, man, a lot of the dialogue is SOOOOOO repetitive.

"I need to replace your faulty responsometer, Tina!"

"I-I-I'm only tin!"

"I'm the only metal that is liquid at room temperature!"

"Doc would love me if I was a real girl!"

"Robots can't shed tears!"

I've slowly become a fan of Lead. He has the most personality. He will make a joke here. Maybe an astute observation there. Supportive of his teammates. So yeah I'm team Lead now in this series.

All of Kanigher's work tended to be repetitive. (His Wonder Woman sure was.) But Metal Men was the worst, because he gave each metal exactly one personality trait and beat it into the ground.

...This is a new Peter Cannon? A mini?

I read Dial H for Hero #1. I liked it pretty well. I always love Joe Quinones's art, and Sam Humphreys has been one of my favorite writers for awhile now. I'm glad to see him getting an ongoing title at DC again (I think he did a Green Lantern book for a decent stretch awhile back).

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