Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Let me know when you've finished this one. I had mixed feelings.

Mark Sullivan said:

Also started the six-part Vertigo miniseries Fight For Tomorrow, created by writer Brian Wood and penciller Denys Cowan (Kent Williams did the inking and covers). It features a martial arts fighter with a shadowy past, so shadowy that after the first two issues I'm not quite sure where the story is going.

I thought it had been revealed recently that Nasha and Bucky had an affair back in WWII..or maybe that was the 50s.

She was very young then.  Possibly a ballerina.  I just don't recall the details, but it justified their getting together today.

Mark Stanislawski said:

Just finished Winter Soldier vol. 1: Longest Winter.

Ed Brubaker clearly loves writing political espionage thrillers and with the characters running around the Marvel U, it works to the nth degree! What a great opening story!

One thing did catch my eye, though. Bucky reminisces about watching the Black Widow in the 50's. Even if it was '58 and Natasha was 16, that makes her about 70 today!! Was it ever revealed if she ages more slowly or not at all? She looks to be drawn like she's in her mid-30's! Maybe she's been using Nick's Infinity formula?

I read issues 2-4 of Stumptown (second volume) by Greg Rucka and Matthew Southworth. It's straightforward PI stuff. Did it ever get tense during that last issue or two. This is pretty much a case of trying to retrieve a stolen guitar for a rock star, and it becomes so much more. Fantastic stuff. The art seems a little more rushed than it did in the previous volume, but there are some really nice quality shots in there from time to time as well.

Started Scalped Vol. 10: Trail's End. It's the big series conclusion, but Aaron hasn't slowed down the pace at all. He's got a bunch of unresolved plot hurtling towards a final crisis, from the look of it. And two more issues of Fight For Tomorrow. One dramatic weakness: Wood doesn't fully explain protagonist Cedric's back story until the middle of issue 4. That's a long time for a monthly reader to wait, and I remember having trouble following it at the time. The cover dates say that it came out in six consecutive monthly issues, but I remember at least one delay towards the end.

I read Evan Dorkin's House of Fun--doggone it did I miss Evan Dorkin! Dark Horse, please tell me that this will be a regular gig. Lots of good stuff from Milk and Cheese to The Murder Family, but my favorites were the little one-strip cartoons. I would love to see a monthly book of humor strips from Dorkin, Peter Bagge, and Kate Beaton.

I also read issues 10 and 11 of Brian Wood's Conan, with art by Declan Shalvey. I've liked Wood's take on Conan. It reads very smoothly, and the artists he's been paired up with have been pretty awesome too. This was a harrowing issue, and I'm looking forward to the next one.

Last but not least, my one-issue trials of many Marvel Now books fell upon Cable and X-Force, based on the writing talents of Dennis Hopeless (X-Men Season One). Honestly, if I had realized that this was drawn by Salvador LaRocca before opening it up, I probably would have left it right there on the shelf. But I gave it a look-through, and there was a scene of the X-Force arresting Bullseye that somehow peaked my interest. After I got it home and read it, I realized that this was a false interpretation of the scene--it wasn't an arrest, and it wasn't Bullseye. It was Havok. But that's okay. This was a good issue, despite it being a Cable book. And LaRocca's art looks far less photo-referenced than it did when he was drawing Iron Man. I find myself surprised to say that I will be back for #2.

Finished Scalped. Aaron did a good job tying up the loose ends, although he left a few new ones. Dash doesn't get his happy ending, but I think there's some potential for happiness later, even if Dash doesn't see it himself. My only criticism is all of the dark fight scenes. I found myself reading them multiple times trying to figure out exactly what was going on--a recurring problem in the series--and that really interrupts the story telling.

Also read the last two issues of Fight For Tomorrow. It's not Brian Wood's best work. It was trying to be a story about human trafficking, but the main focus was on Cedric's personal pain, which Wood never clearly ties to his past. We get flashbacks, but it's far from a clear story. All of the fight scenes make it look like a martial arts book, but we don't quite get that either. And the resolution wasn't worth waiting six issues for.

Agreed completely. I remember little about the details of this book, only that it didn't turn out like I thought it was going to, and that it seemed to take a weird turn in there somewhere in what the story even was. I'm sure I liked the art. I'll have to go back and look at this again--but not reread it completely.


Mark Sullivan said:

Also read the last two issues of Fight For Tomorrow. It's not Brian Wood's best work. It was trying to be a story about human trafficking, but the main focus was on Cedric's personal pain, which Wood never clearly ties to his past. We get flashbacks, but it's far from a clear story. All of the fight scenes make it look like a martial arts book, but we don't quite get that either. And the resolution wasn't worth waiting six issues for.

Just read Amazing Spider-Man #694-698.

Not crazy about the whole Alpha story. Not crazy about the character, either. 

The Hobgoblin 3-parter was decent but I was expecting more of a knockdown, drag-out between the two Hobgoblins. Roderick Kingsley becomes certain super-villains and then hands the mantle over to someone "worthy" enough to carry on? Don't know if I like this. It's certainly a new approach. It'll have to grow on me.

The start of Doc Ock as Spidey was a great beginning. I'll be looking forward to #700 just to see who is the new Spider-Man and how they get there. Hopefully, there are no clones involved.

I noticed it being a little rushed as well. I think that was because the last series ran a bit behind. It didn't stop my enjoyment of the series at all though. I did like that this series was a little bit smaller in scale. Even compared to the previous one.

Wandering Sensei said:

I read issues 2-4 of Stumptown (second volume) by Greg Rucka and Matthew Southworth. It's straightforward PI stuff. Did it ever get tense during that last issue or two. This is pretty much a case of trying to retrieve a stolen guitar for a rock star, and it becomes so much more. Fantastic stuff. The art seems a little more rushed than it did in the previous volume, but there are some really nice quality shots in there from time to time as well.

I read Avengers Arena #1 this morning. This was better than I thought it would be. I didn't think it would be that bad in the first place, otherwise I wouldn't have bought it. I like that they at least did acknowledge that this idea did come from The Hunger Games, even within the Marvel U. The art by Kev Walker is really nice.

I've seen nothing to indicate that this is a miniseries, or even a maxiseries, but I really don't see how this story can play out in any way that is ongoing.

Started what now appears to be the penultimate Hellblazer collection. John Constantine, Hellblazer: The Devil's Trench Coat opens with the title arc. Gemma has sold Constantine's storied trench coat on an Internet auction site, and the coat appears to have a demonic self-awareness. Very bad things start happening to everyone who comes in contact with it, and unexplained magical events are impinging on Constantine's life as well.

The second series of Garth Ennis War Stories begins with "The Reivers," illustrated by Cam Kennedy. It's about an SAS unit fighting Germans in the North African desert during World War II.

Finally seriously dipping in to the Phantom Annual Figs sent me. Enjoyed the first story, "The Governor and Suzie." It begins at sea with a creative pirate band. The Phantom follows them to their island headquarters, where he discovers that the pirate captain is also the island's Governor, which makes for a complicated chase scene as he and one of the pirates make their way across the island to report the crimes to the President.

"J for Jenny" was illustrated by the ever-dependable David Lloyd. It tells the story of a World War II British bomber making runs into Germany. Some crew members have begun to question the morality of bombing civilians, despite their own hard memories of the German Blitz.

And "Princess Valerie" from The Phantom. It's a cute one, with the Princess taking a Shirley Temple-like role. I must say the long chase scene at the end was an awful lot like the one in "The Governor and Suzie." I hope there's more than one ending to Phantom stories!

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