Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

Views: 40988

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

“Is anyone else reading the Golden Age Green Arrow Omnibus Vol. 1?”

Bought it but I’m in no hurry to read it.

“Anybody know why Green Arrow's car was called the Arrowplane?”

It doesn’t fly? I guess “arrowplane” is too hilarious of a pun to pass up (such as “King Faraday” or “Tom, Dick and Harriet.”

“Bleah! The Omnibus collects all solo Superman stories in chronological order…”

“Bleah,” indeed. I made the decision to avoid the duplication and pick up the Omnis past that point. That’s a painful decision as well. It’s a lose/lose situation.

“Anyway, these stories are much more varied, clever and engaging than the Green Arrow stories.”

I’m reading the Superman Sunday newspaper strips. Those are generally better than the contemporary comic books.

“The rich guy's dialogue before he becomes woke is almost identical to today's Republican talking points.”

Sounds like “Daddy” Warbucks (but he lives the life, even in the stories I’m reading now in which he’s broke and blind.

"Maw Green" had her own eponymous spin-off strip for a while.

Just noticed that Jeff already mentioned that.

The Baron said:

"Maw Green" had her own eponymous spin-off strip for a while.

Is that an eponymous daily strip? Because what I was talking about is a “topper” which ran in conjunction with the Sunday each week. As long as we’ve come full circle (since this morning), here’s another month of Little Orphan Annie. Crank the melodrama up to eleven!

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE – MAY 1931: “Daddy” is back. His job turned out to be a scam. The employment agency wasn’t legit; it was a front for the construction company. They skim the marks' first week’s ages for finding the job, then the company fires them the next week. This way, they have a steady supply of free labor.

Annie arranges a job for “Daddy” through Mr. Walsh, but “Daddy” is too proud to accept it. He doesn’t know who is offering the job, though, so Annie arranges for Warbucks to “accidentally” bump into Walsh one day, but on that day “Daddy” abandons her out of shame that she must support him. He leaves a note saying he will be back when he has a job.

Annie searches the city for “Daddy,” coming within feet of him several times but neither of them knowing it. He finally finds work driving a truck, but the first day on the job he swerves to avoid hitting a child who has run into traffic, running his truck into a support for an elevated train. His ambulance passes Annie on the way to the hospital. He has suffered an injury near his optic nerve and is now totally blind with a zero percent chance of ever seeing again. He has given his name as “Mr. Oliver,” and at this point hasn’t been told the extent of his injuries.

Annie writes a letter to the Silos, not asking for help, but just explaining the situation. Harold Gray traces the progress of the letter from day to day. It gets as far as the post office in Simmons Corners, but before it can be delivered, the post office burns down and the letter is destroyed.

Maybe the Terraplane influenced the naming of the Arrowplane.

A 1937 Terraplane

From Wikipedia

The Terraplane was a car brand and model built by the Hudson Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, between 1932 and 1938. In its maiden year, the car was branded as the Essex-Terraplane; in 1934 the car became simply the Terraplane. They were inexpensive, yet powerful vehicles that were used in both town and country, as both cars and trucks bore the Terraplane name.

The most memorable sales slogan of the Terraplane years came from 1933: "On the sea that's aquaplaning, in the air that's aeroplaning, but on the land, in the traffic, on the hills, hot diggity dog, THAT'S TERRAPLANING.”

<br/ _origwidth="560">
Dave Palmer said:

Maybe the Terraplane influenced the naming of the Arrowplane.

A 1937 Terraplane

COOL! I've even got that Robert Johnson set and I didn't make the association.



  • Jeff of Earth-J said:

He has suffered an injury near his optic nerve and is now totally blind with a zero percent chance of ever seeing again. He has given his name as “Mr. Oliver,” and at this point hasn’t been told the extent of his injuries.

Considering the way Harold Gray Drew eyes, the characters all looked blind

Annie writes a letter to the Silos, not asking for help, but just explaining the situation. Harold Gray traces the progress of the letter from day to day. It gets as far as the post office in Simmons Corners, but before it can be delivered, the post office burns down and the letter is destroyed.

If I didn't know better I'd think Annie pissed off the wrong supervillain.

While debating if I should get IDW's G.I. Joe Omnibus which reprints the first twelve issues of the Marvel series, I suddenly realized that the originals are in my downstairs closet and decided to dig them out. 

I was shocked to discover that I only bagged and boarded the first three issues and the rest were only bagged and, horror among horrors, I put two books in each bag! Now issues #1-24 have their own bags and boards thus correcting this cosmic comics imbalance!

I read G.I. Joe #1 (Ju'82) which cost $1.50 when books were sixty cents and was printed on better paper (Mando?) and it holds up pretty well. The Joes were the literary descendants of Sgt. Fury & His Howling Commandos with the War On Terror replacing WWII. There were some light-hearted moments, tense situations and outright evil when Cobra massacred an entire village. There was some minor dissent among the team and their mission but they were the good guys! Their leader, Hawk, even said that it is a constitutional ight for citizens to disagree with their government.

Even at this inaugural stage, it was obvious that Scarlet, Snake-Eyes and the now-misnamed Stalker would be centerpieces of the book, though Rock N'Roll gets a brief spotlight.

Cobra was just foot soldiers at this point with the pontificating Cobra Commander and his femme fatale, the Baroness who was created for the book but soon became an action figure! 

Look forward to rereading the series! Yo, Joe!

War on Terror in 1982?

Iran Hostage Crisis as an example.

Richard Willis said:

War on Terror in 1982?

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE – JUNE 1931: Warbucks takes the news of his blindness stoically, but he has also seemingly lost the will to fight. Meanwhile, Annie waits patiently for word from the Silos which will never come. She writes to Spike Marlin, too, but he has sailed to another country and is spending time there. Business is so good for Jake that he buys the vacant pool hall next door, knocks through the wall, and expands.

Warbucks hires a lawyer to sue the trucking company for compensation. They haven’t paid any of his hospital bills, and when the lawyer investigates further, the company denies that “Mr. Oliver” ever worked for them in the first place. In fact, they assert that he stole the truck and had an accident trying to get away with it. But, if he drops the case against him, they won’t press charges. The lawyer searches for witnesses, but they have all been paid off. Realizing it is hopeless, Warbucks drops the case.

He is adamant that Annie not find out his situation (because it would make her sad). He grows a beard and begins wearing dark glasses. Physically, except for his vision, he has recovered. He meets a well-to-do dwarf named Flophouse Bill who is destined to be a key player in Warbucks’ recovery.

Harold Gray takes a couple of days to address his critics, vicariously through Annie, who complain anonymously to the newspaper that “the comics aren’t funny anymore.” This seems like a good time to mention, regarding the label “all ages,” Golden Age comic strips are the best representation of that, because in those days, virtually everyone read the “funnies” in the newspaper and they had to be designed to appeal to both kids and adults. The complaint that “comic strips aren’t funny anymore” has been around since the beginning of the medium; spike Jones even recorded a song about it in the 1940s.

The June Sunday strips tell a mini-story about kids playing in traffic and getting hit by cars. Annie takes it i=ujpon herself to crusade for a safe area for city kids to play. A local businessman volunteers the use of the roof of his garage for use as a playground, and once the adults in the neighborhood get wind ot the idea, everyone contributes to make it safe and a success.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2018   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service