Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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FF GRAND DESIGN #2: Fantastic Four: Grand Design is similar to X-Men: Grand Design in many ways yet it is also quite different. Fantastic Four: Grand Design is an exhausting read. Tom Scioli hits all the highlight in tiny little panels, but it is more of a fast-paced condensation of the series rather than a story in its own right. I found it entertaining, but I wouldn’t recommendi it to anyone not already well-versed in FF lore. After he gets to a certain point (roughly 2/3 through the Lee/Kirby run), FF:GD bears more of a likeness to Spider-Man: Life Story as Scioli condenses the next few decades worth of stories. There is a time twist at the end of the series, but it is not nearly so effective as that in X-Men: Grand Design.

BATMAN vs. RA’S AL GHUL #3: The gist of the story is that Bruce Wayne/Batman has been split into his two “component parts,” i.e., Bruce Wayne and Batman. Only Neal Adams can get away with scripting a Baatman who says, “Damn skippy!”

I was thinking the same thing.  Are Pete and Betty secretly siblings?

Richard Willis said:

The cover tempts me to say that it explains why Peter liked Betty Brant so much.

Two AHOY! Comics titles today…

DRAGONFLY & DRAGONFLYMAN #1: I didn’t like this one as much as I thought I would, but I can’t really put my finger on what didn’t click. The action jumps back and forth between Earth Alpha and Earth Omega on which the two sets of heroes (including Stinger) are tackling a similar case. Perhaps I would have enjoyed it more had the stories been separate, a flip book or something.

SECOND COMING #5: I really liked issue 31 of this series, but #2-4 didn’t grab me as much. For whatever reason, I liked #5 as much as I did #1. Most of the letters published are from people of faith who are enjoying the comic.

Via Hoopla Digital I have been reading the Two Fisted Tales Archive volume 3 and I am impressed. Up to now I have only read EC horror and science fiction stories and though the art is uniformly good, the stories could often be formulaic. Two Fisted Tales draws on actual historical battles which makes for interesting stories and the artwork is as good or better than anything else I have seen from EC. Considering what other publishers were offering in the early Fifties, it is no wonder EC is held in such high regard.

An interesting side note - one of the letter pages includes a promo for the upcoming Two Fisted Tales annual reprinting stories from its earliest issues. The annual is 128 pages for 25 cents! And I always thought the 80 Page Giants were a deal at that price.



doc photo said:

Via Hoopla Digital I have been reading the Two Fisted Tales Archive volume 3 and I am impressed. Up to now I have only read EC horror and science fiction stories and though the art is uniformly good, the stories could often be formulaic. Two Fisted Tales draws on actual historical battles which makes for interesting stories and the artwork is as good or better than anything else I have seen from EC. Considering what other publishers were offering in the early Fifties, it is no wonder EC is held in such high regard.

An interesting side note - one of the letter pages includes a promo for the upcoming Two Fisted Tales annual reprinting stories from its earliest issues. The annual is 128 pages for 25 cents! And I always thought the 80 Page Giants were a deal at that price.

Speaking of EC Comics, this ships tomorrow. (See "Your Favorite Things of the Year" for detailed contents.)

I haven't found a good place online to read EC and Fawcett, Doc, so I tried to sign up for this Hoopla of which you speak. Ran into a problem. My main library here in Memphis (where I have a library card) doesn't offer Hoopla, so my choices were two places in MIssissippi or one in Collierville. All three are small, and I wasn't sure they'd have what I wanted, so I tried for a bigger library. Tried Nashville, and sure enough, the main system had Hoopla.

But when I applied, it said there was a problem with my library PIN. I didn't know I had a library PIN! Is the problem that I don't have a library card with Nashville? Is it that my IP address is in Memphis? Has my library card expired somehow? I dunno. Advice?

doc photo said:

Via Hoopla Digital I have been reading the Two Fisted Tales Archive volume 3 and I am impressed. Up to now I have only read EC horror and science fiction stories and though the art is uniformly good, the stories could often be formulaic. Two Fisted Tales draws on actual historical battles which makes for interesting stories and the artwork is as good or better than anything else I have seen from EC. Considering what other publishers were offering in the early Fifties, it is no wonder EC is held in such high regard.

An interesting side note - one of the letter pages includes a promo for the upcoming Two Fisted Tales annual reprinting stories from its earliest issues. The annual is 128 pages for 25 cents! And I always thought the 80 Page Giants were a deal at that price.

I don't recall the exact requirements as It has been a couple of years since I signed up but I believe you can only use the service if the library your card is with offers Hoopla. I am assuming each library pays for Hoopla and what can be offered. My account allows for 5 borrows per month while my daughter through her library gets up to 8 borrows. Is it possible for you to get a card with the Nashville branch?

Captain Comics said:

I haven't found a good place online to read EC and Fawcett, Doc, so I tried to sign up for this Hoopla of which you speak. Ran into a problem. My main library here in Memphis (where I have a library card) doesn't offer Hoopla, so my choices were two places in MIssissippi or one in Collierville. All three are small, and I wasn't sure they'd have what I wanted, so I tried for a bigger library. Tried Nashville, and sure enough, the main system had Hoopla.

But when I applied, it said there was a problem with my library PIN. I didn't know I had a library PIN! Is the problem that I don't have a library card with Nashville? Is it that my IP address is in Memphis? Has my library card expired somehow? I dunno. Advice?

Which reminds me of this gag from Not Brand Echh #12, which had as its premise that all of the women John Romita drew looked alike.



The Baron said:

I was thinking the same thing.  Are Pete and Betty secretly siblings?

Richard Willis said:

The cover tempts me to say that it explains why Peter liked Betty Brant so much.

That’s hard to see.  The caption is “ Match the pair most similar (all were drawn especially for Brechh, natch, by good ol’ Ring-a-Ding  Romita!)”

The names supplied are”Gwen Staysee, Sarey Jane Whatsit, Beatrice Smerk, Pamela Chic, Hilda Iceberg, Virginia Pipeline”

Down in the answers it reads “Match the pair:  We fooled ya!  Actually, none of them are the least bit similar!”

Captain Comics said:

I haven't found a good place online to read EC and Fawcett, Doc, so I tried to sign up for this Hoopla of which you speak. Ran into a problem. My main library here in Memphis (where I have a library card) doesn't offer Hoopla, so my choices were two places in MIssissippi or one in Collierville. All three are small, and I wasn't sure they'd have what I wanted, so I tried for a bigger library. Tried Nashville, and sure enough, the main system had Hoopla.

But when I applied, it said there was a problem with my library PIN. I didn't know I had a library PIN! Is the problem that I don't have a library card with Nashville? Is it that my IP address is in Memphis? Has my library card expired somehow? I dunno. Advice?

Advice? Go sign up for a Nashville library card.

The Memphis and Nashville library systems may have a reciprocal relationship that would link the card you already have with the Memphis library system to the Nashville library system. But even if they don't, it's likely that you can get a Nashville library card even if you don't live there.

Regarding your PIN, yes, you have one, even if you don't know what it is. To find out what it is, the easiest way, I find, is to visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask.

The harder way -- although they always swear up, down and sideways that it's easy, I never find it to be so -- is to go online to your library's website, find the button that goes to your account, and go to your account. There should be a place for you to enter your library card number and your PIN. 

"But I didn't know I even had a library PIN!" you say. "How can I enter it?" (This is why I say this is the harder way.) I've found that the default PIN is something like your year of birth, or the last four digits of your library card number. (There might even be something on the site that specifically tells you which of those options work for that library system.) Try those.

If those don't work, use the link that allows you to reset your PIN. Then when you get locked out of your account, visit your friendly neighborhood library, show the card to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and ask him or her to unlock your account and reset your PIN.

Yes, I have done this lots of times. How did you guess? 

Just a quick line to praise Hawkman at the moment.

From someone who has only ever had a passing interest in the guy up until now can I say how blown away I am by the current series which I have recently devoured the first trade of.

So much history, purpose, continuity and intrigue along with excellent pacing and incredible artwork.

Honestly, one of the best I've read in a very, very long while!

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