Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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I remember liking Filthy Rich, although it wasn't my favorite of the Vertigo Crime series. I wrote a blog entry that talks about Filthy Rich and several others. Today I read Robert Tinnell and Bo Hampton's Sight Unseen, a hardcover Image OGN from 2006 (I picked it up cheap at HeroesCon). It has an intriguing premise: a blind scientist develops glasses that allow him to see ghosts. But there's an unusual haunted house at the center of the story, which makes for a complicated series of murders. I thought it was OK, but I wouldn't especially recommend it unless you really love ghost stories. I remember Hampton's art from a couple of Batman Elseworlds he illustrated, but it seemed a little underdone here.

Over the holidays I finished The Phantom 2012 Annual Special. I enjoyed it. There were several shorter serials that only ran for two or three months originally, as well as a facsimile edition of "The Phantom Versus The-Old-Man-of-the-Mountains." The last story was the most recent by far: "The Curse of the Sacred Image" from 1974, illustrated by Sy Barry. I thought the art was a significant improvement over Wilson McCoy's work from the 1940s and 1950s.

Mark, I haven't read either Dark Entries or Area 10. I'm anxious to read them now, but I put a no-more moratorium on buying new graphic novels after stacking up just how many I've bought but haven't read. It's pretty staggering. I have to get at least 3/4 of them read before I'm allowed to buy any more.

This morning I did read Action Comics #0, 14, and 15, plus Annual #1. I liked the point made about a shark displacing the water around it as it swims as an analogy to the effects of time travel and reality. Very Morrison-esque. I also read Happy #2, and next up is #3.

Mark Sullivan said:

Today I read Robert Tinnell and Bo Hampton's Sight Unseen, a hardcover Image OGN from 2006 (I picked it up cheap at HeroesCon). It has an intriguing premise: a blind scientist develops glasses that allow him to see ghosts. But there's an unusual haunted house at the center of the story, which makes for a complicated series of murders. I thought it was OK, but I wouldn't especially recommend it unless you really love ghost stories. I remember Hampton's art from a couple of Batman Elseworlds he illustrated, but it seemed a little underdone here.

Man, I loved Sight Unseen, and I am not a big fan of ghost stories.

Different strokes, I guess. I think you've said you don't like any of Steve Niles' books, and I can't get enough. There are lots of positive reviews of Sight Unseen on Amazon, too, I was surprised to see.

Travis Herrick said:

Mark Sullivan said:

Today I read Robert Tinnell and Bo Hampton's Sight Unseen, a hardcover Image OGN from 2006 (I picked it up cheap at HeroesCon). It has an intriguing premise: a blind scientist develops glasses that allow him to see ghosts. But there's an unusual haunted house at the center of the story, which makes for a complicated series of murders. I thought it was OK, but I wouldn't especially recommend it unless you really love ghost stories. I remember Hampton's art from a couple of Batman Elseworlds he illustrated, but it seemed a little underdone here.

Man, I loved Sight Unseen, and I am not a big fan of ghost stories.

At work I wrapped up Essential Warlock recently. There are a lot of older comics that are well regarded that I do get. This though? No way, this was terrible. We got a recap of the first issue 3 times in the next 4 issues, or was it 4 times in the next 5. Either way it was really annoying, and seemed like padding. Terrible villains in the beginning. As much subtlety as a hammer to the head with the Christ metaphors/allusions going on. I still don't understand how the Magus was able to go back 5000 years in the past. Pip the Troll aka annoying sidekick. Walls of text and info dumps.

It did get better as it went on, but really that isn't much of a positive. It did have really good art in most of it though.

Resumed John Constantine, Hellblazer: The Devil's Trench Coat with the second story arc, "Another Season In Hell." This is a classic Constantine trip to Hell, this time to get his sister Cheryl out of Hell and satisfy the burning question Gemma has about why she's there. Knowing that the series is about to end, I can't help seeing this as part of the unfinished business Milligan is getting to before the final curtain.

The second series of Garth Ennis War Stories continues with "Condors," illustrated by Carlos Ezquerra. It's set in the Spanish Civil War for a change, but it looks backward to World War I as well as forward to the upcoming World War II. Four soldiers from both sides of the conflict have taken refuge in a foxhole, and they while away the time until nightfall by telling stories about how they got there. They are a diverse group, and in addition to the war stories (theirs and their parents') the conversation touches on other matters like the Irish conflict and the rise of Nazism in Germany. It's arguably the richest of any of the War Stories, even if it is talkier than most. I did think the bleak epilogue describing the eventual fates of the four soldiers was overkill. I would have been happy to leave it at them dispersing at nightfall, hopefully wiser for the experience.

Finished the Hellblazer collection. Visits to Hell always seem to result in complications, and this one quickly spirals out of control. Constantine does get his sister out in the end, but not without injury and death to those close to him. The epilogue "Dark Magic" does seem to have finally put his dark twin to rest, so that's one less possible plot complication as the series heads towards the end.

The final War Story in the second series was "Archangel," which tells the story of an R.A.F. fighter pilot who gets volunteered for a new experimental CAMship. CAM is an acronym for "Catapult Aircraft Merchantmen," which uses a catapult to launch a fighter plane from a merchant ship, giving a convoy air protection without having an aircraft carrier. I confess that I had never heard of the program. It's just crazy enough to look like a comic book invention, but like everything else in these stories it is true history.

Flash Archives volume 5. A ton of great stuff here. A number of appearances of the Rogue's Gallery like Captain Cold and The Top. The first appearance of a couple more, Heat Wave and Reverse Flash. We also get Kid Flash's new costume. Plus the introduction of a couple of supporting characters, Professor West, and one of my all-time favorite, Paul Gambi the tailor who makes the costumes for all of the supervillains.

This morning I woke up at 4:30 and couldn't get back to sleep. I read the latest chapter of Godzilla: Half Century War. The story isn't bad, but it's really the art that sells me on this one. Man, is it ever good. James Stokoe can do whatever he wants and I'll buy it.

Apparently Gary Lactus of the Mindless Ones gets a wee cameo?

Yes he does! Even my 4:30am eyes caught that poster on the wall. Come to think of if, I remember them mentioning that on the show a few weeks back.

Wizzywig by Ed Piskor. About a computer prodigy who gets involved with hacking and phreaking. Really good read that deals media, unlawful incarcerations, and crime.

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