As some of you know, I fell off the DC comp list with The New 52, and decided that was a sign from Zeus to start trade-waiting. And with the April solicits, I see decision time has arrived.

That is to say: Which trades or HCs will I buy? I'm certainly not going to pop for all 52, so I have to pick and choose. So let me ask you, Legionnaires:

  • Which titles are so intrinsic to New 52 continuity that they are musts?
  • Which titles are just so flaming good that they are musts?
  • Which titles lend themselves to collections the best?
  • Which titles can be "safely" skipped?
  • Which titles are YOU buying?


And so forth. Sound off, folks! Which New 52 titles would you choose for the Captain Comics bookshelf?

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REALLY? Since when? ;-)

As I recall, there was no Google in my childhood, so I had a lot of questions with no answers. When I was young, there were no decent superhero movies. When I was young there were no Mon-El action figures. In my childhood, adults didn't know who Wolverine was. When I was young, I was the only person I knew who read comic books, and had no one to talk to about them. When I was little, there was no Comic-Con International: San Diego. When I was young reprints were rare, and I had no reason to believe I'd ever be able to read anything published before 1961. When I was young, sci-fi "didn't sell" and anyone interested in SF or fantasy was ridiculed and bullied. There were no video games. Dentistry was abysmal. Television and movies had terrible special effects. People wore bell bottoms in a non-ironic way.

Should I go on?

So far, the only "new 52!" comic I've been able to stand, despite the changes, has been Batman Inc. It looks like the comic will be cancelled with #13; then a new mini, Damian Son of Batman, will do a re-look at Damian's life (I'll pass). They could have kept Stephanie Brown's Batgirl & Cassandra Cain/Blackbat, but wiped them from existence for the sake of just doing it. :rolleyes:
I think after Batman Inc. folds, I'll stop picking up DC's comics.

I've enjoyed Jonah Hex, partly because it has no connection to the DC universe, beyond some occasional references to Batman--there may have been a couple others that I didn't care about and didn't matter. Seeing him in "urban" settings is a different approach. The backup strips showing all the 1970s western characters have been hit or miss, but at least it's interesting from month to month.

Granted, that's not a superhero comic, but reading one DC superhero comic today is pretty tough to do. I do like Smallville, which by design is a standalone, and they've expanded the universe to include Batman and bought back Supergirl and Impulse, which is fun. But again, not a new52 comic.Even at Marvel, the only one I'm reading is Daredevil, and that has worked pretty well, except for the rare crossover. Dipping a toe into these superhero worlds isn't a satisfying deal.

And, like Lee, I'm still reading a bunch of stuff: Astro City, Doctor Who, Classic Popeye, Invincible, Sergio Aragones Funnies. I was reading Dark Horse Presents for a long time, but the mix of good and bad shifted too far the wrong way.

-- MSA

The monthly sales model has its problems.  The DCU comic that looks most interesting to me from outside is Dial H for Hero, but it was starting to wind down just when I started to glean that it seemed fairly interesting and original.  (The answer is to consume everything uncritically so that you sift out the odd gem.  Tricky when funds are low, and with the added drawback of encouraging the production of lots of not-so-great books.)  I'll look forward to reading it in trades at some point.

 

Apart from that, there's not much from the DCU I'm interested in.  It's been said before, but the central books are very '90s Image comics', aren't they?  But with slightly better art.  How did that happen?  I flicked through some of their current central big-whoop comics last time I was at the LCS.  Why's everyone so angry now?

 

Currently Lazerus, Uber, Astro City, and Young Avengers are all shaping up to be fine books that I got in on the ground floor on, so I can't really complain.

 

I've been merrily working my through books I missed first time around too, that I got from Comixology sales.  Bulletproof Coffin and Jennifer Blood were both lurid, OTT treats.

When I stop and think about what the good Captain said:

"As I recall, there was no Google in my childhood, so I had a lot of questions with no answers. When I was young, there were no decent superhero movies. When I was young there were no Mon-El action figures. In my childhood, adults didn't know who Wolverine was. When I was young, I was the only person I knew who read comic books, and had no one to talk to about them. When I was little, there was no Comic-Con International: San Diego. When I was young reprints were rare, and I had no reason to believe I'd ever be able to read anything published before 1961. When I was young, sci-fi "didn't sell" and anyone interested in SF or fantasy was ridiculed and bullied. There were no video games. Dentistry was abysmal. Television and movies had terrible special effects. People wore bell bottoms in a non-ironic way."

I have to agree. From a technological standpoint, the world and (to an extent) the individuals on it are better off than they used to be.

But on the other hand, there once seemed to be a lot more creativity in the world too.

I have been a reader (and I do stress the R word) of many genres in a multitude of formats for a long time now. In a world of sequels and reboots, to say that I have seen it "all" (quotes mine), at least in comic books, is starting to come true.

I am not giving up on the medium, but I am hoping to see more unique (original) periodicals than I have in recent years.

When I was a teenager (way back in the '70s), it was so hard to find out anything. We had a complete set of FUNK & WAGNALLS ENCYCLOPEDIAE in our house, so I spent a lot of time reading those, but still. It always bugged me that I had to work so hard at trying to get any information.

I was glad to get the Metropolis Edition of THE AMAZING WORLD OF SUPERMAN, because in that tabloid they explained the whole process from start to finish of how a comic book was made. But at the same time I was angry that I had to wait for that book, before my questions could be answered at last.

Nevertheless, I learned how to get information through dogged determination. I suppose if you're raised in an environment where information is easily accessible, you don't develop a tough-minded persistence at getting to the facts.

I saw that this morning! At first, I thought Magpie was just a substitute Catwoman but it did resemble CGI porn!

Not that I know what that looks like!
 
Doctor Hmmm? said:

 Mr. Silver Age said:

Comics: They're not just for kids any more! In fact, they're not for kids at all!

-- MSA

I had the same thought last night as I watched the 2nd episode of the new "Beware the Batman" show.  I enjoyed the show (ish) and I like the stylized character designs. 

But Holy Crow, I'd come to no end of grief on the home front if I let Action Lad see this version of Magpie in the {ahem} flesh.  Not to mention the "not nearly as subtle as they thought it was" innuendo.  "Not suitable for kids" isn't what you should be shooting for with a Batman cartoon on Cartoon Network.

Yes, getting info was tough in the pre-Internet world. And, yes, you learned that only doggedness eventually gave you the answers. Some of us, as a result, became newspaper reporters!

Jimmm Kelly said:

When I was a teenager (way back in the '70s), it was so hard to find out anything. We had a complete set of FUNK & WAGNALLS ENCYCLOPEDIAE in our house, so I spent a lot of time reading those, but still. It always bugged me that I had to work so hard at trying to get any information.

I was glad to get the Metropolis Edition of THE AMAZING WORLD OF SUPERMAN, because in that tabloid they explained the whole process from start to finish of how a comic book was made. But at the same time I was angry that I had to wait for that book, before my questions could be answered at last.

Nevertheless, I learned how to get information through dogged determination. I suppose if you're raised in an environment where information is easily accessible, you don't develop a tough-minded persistence at getting to the facts.

 Some of us, as a result, became newspaper reporters!

Where our elaborate vocabularies put others to shame! Although I'm still looking for my first article in which to use "invulnerable." At least, my first besides all those times I write about Superman.

I still remember seeing my first fanzines back in the late 1960s and realizing they *knew* what was coming in future comics! Not that it mattered so much, because I'd know when I saw them on the spinner, and I'd buy 'em anyway. But still, that meant they were talking to the guys doing them. That was pretty cool.

-- MSA

Lee said:

I am not giving up on the medium, but I am hoping to see more unique (original) periodicals than I have in recent years.

I think they are out there. They just aren't being produced by the Big 2 for the most part.

Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) Said:

"Lee said:
I am not giving up on the medium, but I am hoping to see more unique (original) periodicals than I have in recent years.
I think they are out there. They just aren't being produced by the Big 2 for the most part."


The thing that really is depressing me is this conversation made me sit down and review. I am now collecting only 8 titles: Justice League of America, Justice League, Earth 2 Worlds' Finest, Suicide Squad, Mighty Avengers (When it debuts soon), Uncanny Avengers and Doctor Who. Less than 2 years ago, I was picking up three times that many easily.

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