I bought new comics (and old) yesterday and ACTION COMICS #985 and #986 were among them.
It occurred to me, when I looked at the numbers, that we are REALLY close to reaching ACTION #1000!
I used to imagine when ACTION would reach #1000 as a young fan, I counted forward to when it would happen (Of course, I didn't anticipate the period of far-more-than-monthly ACTION material that have, heh, primed the pump ahead of the 2020s, when I guess a 1970s schedule would have landed it - but, nonetheless, it's almost here:-)) I'll try and stay alive for this one!:-)...

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...It seems this little phone WILL NOT LET (SOB!):-( me correct my numerous mis-posts above. Continuing...

Bouncing Boy teaming up with Herbie Popnecker against Marvel's Kingpin?

Yes, I see the door.

When the Spectre sleeps his dreams start transforming the world. France reverts to the 17th century. The super-scientists of the Invisible Empire attack America with giant tanks and robots. Then his dreams open up a pathway to the reentry into our world of Koth and his armies. Superman, Superboy, Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, Robotman, Dr Occult, the Star-Spangled Kid, Stripesy, Slam Bradley, Red, Whitey and Blooey, Bart Regan, Steve Carson, Sandy Kean, Henri Duval, and the Federal Men of Tomorrow (with their junior contingent) team up to solve the crisis.

The pre-Crisis Earth 1 Superman awakens and it is revealed that everything that has happened since Crisis on Infinite Earths has been a dream.



Jeff of Earth-J said:

The pre-Crisis Earth 1 Superman awakens and it is revealed that everything that has happened since Crisis on Infinite Earths has been a dream.


Giving rise to DC's next big event...Prebirth!



Detective 445 said:



Jeff of Earth-J said:

The pre-Crisis Earth 1 Superman awakens and it is revealed that everything that has happened since Crisis on Infinite Earths has been a dream.


Giving rise to DC's next big event...Prebirth!
And then, the follow-up: Afterbirth!

Took care of that for you.

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...It seems this little phone WILL NOT LET (SOB!):-( me correct my numerous mis-posts above. Continuing...

Hahaha! (Although, that's what I would have called many of the Nu52 titles.)

The Baron said:


And then, the follow-up: Afterbirth!

I think I speak for everyone in saying it it must feature Comet the Super-Horse, or it is a sham of a celebration.

Earth 2 Superman appears and they announce a new JSA series in on the way!
 
Jeff of Earth-J said:

The pre-Crisis Earth 1 Superman awakens and it is revealed that everything that has happened since Crisis on Infinite Earths has been a dream.

...I rather wish this thread hadn"t moved towards Old Fan snarkiness/nostalgia, but I did stay away from it for a long time...A couplish years back, I raved about the New 52 DETECTIVE COMICS #27, I thought that did the whole anniversary ish thing right...Now we have a much more " real " anniversary issuue coming up! Really, a once in a lifetime one...although 'TEC #1000 will be of note, too!
There was a Curt Swan?? postef in the 70s of Superman giving the peace/Winston Churchill sign. I never had it, but I imagined it being the cover of ACTION #1000. And now it's here!:-):-0!

I'm sorry if my post contributed to that drift, ED. I was being jokey, insofar as DC obviously won't do that, but that was the best idea I could come up with. The idea was to team-up all the heroes Jerry Siegel created for DC.

Whether Jimmy qualifies is arguable. But it's possible the comics' copy boy inspired the radio show's.

Superboy debuted in More Fun Comics #101 while Siegel was in the army. But he had previously suggested a "Superboy" series about "Superman before he developed a social conscience", and the GCD currently credits him with the script of the first "Superboy" story.(1) Anyway, Joe Shuster is widely credited with the story's art.

"The Spectre" was created by Siegel and Bernard Baily, and appeared in More Fun Comics and All-Star Comics (first in solo stories in the latter, then as a member of the JSA). It was the first superhero feature in More Fun Comics, and headlined the title for over a year. I made him the source of the crisis as he's so powerful.

Robotman was a long-running character. He moved from Star Spangled Comics to Detective Comics and appeared until 1953.(2) The original artist was Leo Nowak.

The Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy were the original stars of Star Spangled Comics. The feature was partly an imitation of "Batman" - I think the crude art was supposed to be like Bob Kane's - and DC evidently had hopes it'd be a hit: the opening issues carried two or three "Star-Spangled Kid" stories up to #6, and the feature was introduced by a 3 page preview in Action Comics #40. The original artist was Hal Sherman.

"Dr. Occult" and "Henri Duval" were the Siegel and Shuster team's first features in print. They debuted in New Fun #6. Its a mistake to suppose Golden Age features were always initiated by their writers and artists, as they may have been suggested or devised by the editors. I think the short-lived "Henri Duval" might be a case of that. It was an imitation of The Three Musketeers, and its replacement was an adaptation of The Three Musketeers that Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson wrote. "Dr. Occult" ended when "Superman" started.

"Slam Bradley", "Bart Regan, Spy", "Federal Men" (with Steve Carson), and "Calling All Cars"/"Radio Squad" (with Sandy Kean) were further pre-"Superman" features the team did together. The features continued past the debut of "Superman". Other artists took over from Shuster, but Siegel continued to write them for awhile.

"Red, White and Blue" was about three servicemen who fought threats to America. Red was a marine, Whitey was in the army, and Blooey in the navy. They worked with a female government agent named Doris West. The feature's principle slot was in All-American Comics, but it also appeared in New York World's Fair Comics, World's Best Comics/World's Finest Comics, All-Star Comics, and Comic Cavalcade, so I suppose it was one of Siegel's biggest successes. The original artist was William Smith.

Although it was a G-man feature, "Federal Men" did some SF stories. In one story the heroes talked to a scientist about what the Federal Men of the far future would be like. In another a group of boys in the far future were inspired by old issues of New Adventure Comics to found a future Junior Federal Men club.

Siegel and Shuster got into comic books on the ground floor, so some of their work was more groundbreaking for comics than it seems at this distance. I recently saw the giant robot from "Federal Men" cited as the first giant robot. It predates the one from Brick Bradford. I think "Dr. Occult" was the first horror series. As far as I know its closest precedent in newspaper strips was Mandrake the Magician, which had only been running a year. "Red, White and Blue" was an early patriotic/serviceman feature. It debuted in All-American Comics #1 in Mar. 1939 (on sale), months before the outbreak of WWII in Europe.

My initial idea, inspired by Detective Comics #572 (and #500, which I mixed up with it), was to team-up the heroes from the title's past. I suppose that would have been a better suggestion as most fans don't share my interest in Siegel's other work.

(1) I don't know what the evidence for that is. The GCD credits its assessment to Martin O'Hearn. The story is a retelling of the origin that includes boyhood scenes, so I'm wondering if it was an unused script intended as a "Superman" one-off. The sample "Superman" strips Siegel did with Russell Keaton depict Superman as a boy.

(2) And the Doom Patrol's Robotman was evidently based on him. I know Arnold Drake denied this, and the Patrol's Robotman was initially called "Automaton". But I doubt Drake came up with all the characters by himself, editor Jack Schiff was certainly aware of the original Robotman, and the Patrol's version's appearance was a variation on the original's.

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