Well here we are to my third box of unread comics. For those who haven't followed, theoretically I read a comic a day of comics I bought and never got around to reading. Some of them going back to the early '90s (well when I bought them I should say). I will review some of those comics. I tried to post one once a week, but I do get lazy. 

 

Enjoy!

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It was uneven, to be sure but Super Villain Team-Up was part of a great crossover with the Avengers and even featured the Champions. And #15 had an astounding Red Skull/Hate Monger team-up that was oddly poignant in a twisted, evil way.

I'm pretty sure that Jean Gray started going by Jean Gray when Marvel put out the animated X-men cartoon series, and she was identified as such.  Perhaps the names "Phoenix" or "Marvel Girl" were taken or nixed. It certainly seemed odd.

PowerBook Pete (The Mad Mod) said:

Travis Herrick said:

Doesn't Jean Grey still go by Jean Grey after all of these year?

She was Marvel Girl or Phoenix when I knew her.

I think she was going by Jean Grey during X-Factor as well. It did amuse me and my friends when we would watch that X-men cartoon and you see the names of Cyclops and Wolverine flash across the screen and then Jean Grey. Always came off kind of lame.

Kirk G said:

I'm pretty sure that Jean Gray started going by Jean Gray when Marvel put out the animated X-men cartoon series, and she was identified as such.  Perhaps the names "Phoenix" or "Marvel Girl" were taken or nixed. It certainly seemed odd.

PowerBook Pete (The Mad Mod) said:

Travis Herrick said:

Doesn't Jean Grey still go by Jean Grey after all of these year?

She was Marvel Girl or Phoenix when I knew her.



Chris Fluit said:

I keep on seeing that seemingly everything that Morrison gets credit for doing first in the DCU was actually done before!

 

I've been saying that for years.

 

It's HOW he does it, though!

 

And creating new stuff is profoundly against the spirit of these corporate owned universes. They have been suppressing genuine innovation for years.

You Got That Right!

Travis Herrick said:

I think she was going by Jean Grey during X-Factor as well. It did amuse me and my friends when we would watch that X-men cartoon and you see the names of Cyclops and Wolverine flash across the screen and then Jean Grey. Always came off kind of lame.

Kirk G said:

I'm pretty sure that Jean Gray started going by Jean Gray when Marvel put out the animated X-men cartoon series, and she was identified as such.  Perhaps the names "Phoenix" or "Marvel Girl" were taken or nixed. It certainly seemed odd.

 

There was the rumor in 1976 when Ms. Marvel premiered that it was going to feature a more powerful Marvel Girl. IIRC, it was met with great disapproval.

Wanted: The World's Most Dangerous Criminals #4

Dec. 1972

Cover art by: Nick Cardy

I always found Wanted a neat little comic. An anthological reprint series. With the villain being the star of the story in the reprint I guess. Frankly I'm amazed it made it to nine issues. Major kudos to the GCD for providing the credits for these stories.

Story: Fighters Never Quit

Writer: Alfred Bester

Art: Paul Reinman

Here we start out with the first appearance of Solomon Grundy. Solly emerges from a swamp, and soon takes over a criminal gang. Kind of neat to see him running things. He is truly no brains all brawn type of guy. GL confronts him, and Grundy shrugs off his blasts, and knocks Lantern out. GL wonders how it happened since his powers don't work against anything made of wood, and Grundy being made of wood would be impossible

Green Lantern tracks down Grundy again and Grundy knocks him out again, and then throws him over a balcony. Then he kills one of his goons, because he likes it. Well GL confronts Grundy again, and actually holds his own for once. During the fight he throws Grundy in the path of an oncoming train. Doiby then tells Lantern (and us) we will never see him again. GL has read a comic before and ends it with, “I wonder...I wonder...”

Story: Master Man

Writer: William Woolfolk

Art: Pete Riss

Next up we have a Kid Eternity story, well I guess Master Man story, and he takes on the goodly Kid Eternity. Master Man is the Kid's opposite, able to pull evil me from Stygia. If they fail in their task then they get dragged back down to hell. Master Man's first plot is to bring forth Rasputin, and then they will free some prisoners from jail. I guess to do some stuff later. Kid Eternity and Mr. Keeper just happen to be walking by when they enact their plan, so the Kid goes into action. The Kid yells, “Eternity!” Who shows up to foil this plan? Well none other than Knute Rockne! I can't think of another person I would want to help out than a college football coach. Amazingly, he does help stopping the breakout, and Master Man and Rasputin escape. Rasputin sinks into a fire pit because he failed.

Later Master Man is able to kidnap Kid Eternity. He gags him, and calls upon Torquemada to torture the kid for all of, uh, eternity. With a little guile (acting unconscious) the kid escapes and calls upon Will Rogers to bail him out. We get a couple of more historical figures involved in the fight. Kid Eternity wins of course, and while Master Man attempts to escape again a fissure opens up in the ground , swallows him, and closes again.

The characters used in the Kid Eternity may have been a bit silly, but that is definitely part of it's charm. I thought the art was pretty decent in both stories. Pete Riss' was more polished than Bester's, but Besters roughness worked really good for a character like Solomon Grundy. Grundy also piled up quite the body count in that little tale.

Wanted was a great source for Golden Age stories. #4 was a perfect example of giving characters the spotlight like Solomon Grundy was featured throughout the Silver and Bronze Ages. It was also a rare GA Green Lantern reprint which I loved collecting. Kid Eternity had several stories reprinted including his origin. Master Man got his rematch in the first two Adventure Comics Digest (#491-492).

Just a guess, mind you, but one reason William Woolfolk may have used Knute Rockne and Will Rogers in the "Kid Eternity Versus Master Man" adventure was that those two men hadn't been dead all that long---Rockne, for eighteen years; Rogers, for fourteen---and they had been fairly youthful at the times of their deaths.  They would still be in the corporate memories of older readers and the kids would have heard their parents talk about them.

 

Things like that make history more "real" to the fans reading the story than using, say, Agis of Sparta, to hold the line during a prison break.

One story had Kid Eternity summon Thomas Edison but he did use "older" heroes like Alexander Hamilton, Jesse James and Lord Byron.

The more I think of it, the Kid should have a show on PBS!

Alfred Bester also wrote well-known SF stories and novels.

JMS named his Orwellian psychic officer 'Bester' in Babylon 5 after the same writer.

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