Well here we are to my third box of unread comics. For those who haven't followed, theoretically I read a comic a day of comics I bought and never got around to reading. Some of them going back to the early '90s (well when I bought them I should say). I will review some of those comics. I tried to post one once a week, but I do get lazy. 

 

Enjoy!

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As bad as Hornblower is as a name that might appear on the front of a comicbook, it sure beats ... Mal.

That was the point of Hornblower/Guardian II. Except for one issue of World's Finest, Mal Duncan was missing from every Teen Titans appearance after their book was cancelled the first time. When it was revived in the mid-70s, DC was probably hesitant to cut one of its very few African-American heroes from the TT but something had to done to amp him up and justify his place on the team.

Was it successful? Mal Duncan continued on in various forms and identities along with his girl-friend and later wife, Bumblebee. No Transformers jokes, please!

I'd never heard of him before today...

 

Interesting that there was an African-American Guardian before Morrison's Manhattan Guardian.  I keep on seeing that seemingly everything that Morrison gets credit for doing first in the DCU was actually done before!

 

The name 'Jake Jordan' scans quite similarly to 'Mal Duncan' too.  Presumably Grant originally thought of having Mal be the character in his Seven Soldiers.  Something must have stayed his hand.

Mal was introduced in Teen Titans # 26 (Mar.-Apr., 1970), the second issue of editor Dick Giordano's experiment in relevancy on the TT title.

 

This phase, extending throughout 1970, put the Teen Titans through quite an upheaval.  Robin leaves the team.  The Hawk and the Dove join.  A socially conscious benefactor, Mr. Jupiter, takes over, and the youthful heroes abandon their costumes and super-powers.  Giordano's idea was for the Titans to tackle the concerns of "today's young people", i.e., protecting the environment, dealing with racial strife and corporate greed, government-is-evil, that sort of thing.  To do that, Giordano turned the TT from a team of super-protégés into a group of ordinary, "with-it" youths.

 

Mal was enlisted into the Titans during their initial foray under Jupiter's handling---an examination of the urban plight of the ghetto.  Under the circumstances of the Titans at the time, Mal fit right in and was, in fact, one of the stronger personalities.

 

However, Giordano's grand experiment didn't pay off where it counted---in sales.  Under orders of then-editorial director Carmine Infantino (if one goes by Giordano's account), costumes and super-powers began to creep back into the Titans' tales of relevancy.  And after seven issues, the whole idea was jettisoned, except for the on-going presence of Mr. Jupiter, and the Titans were back to being super-heroes, again.

 

This left Mal in an awkward situation.  He was just an ordinary youth in a drab grey uniform amidst the colourful costumes and flashy powers.  He didn't even have any abilities on a par with the archery skill of Speedy or the detective/acrobatic skills of Robin (who had rejoined the team).

 

In the remaining dozen issues of TT, before the series was cancelled in 1973, writer Bob Haney struggled to make Mal significant, but the fact was, he was even more of a fifth wheel to the team than Aqualad had been.  Not surprisingly, Mal suddenly became the guy left behind at headquarters to "coördinate things".  That is, when Haney didn't just omit him from the story completely.

 

 

Regarding the unresolved theft-of-the-horn storyline, Bob Rozakis has said, in this interview and elsewhere, that he was going to reveal that Mal subconsciously wished to give up superheroing and had (unknowingly) hidden it himself.

I keep on seeing that seemingly everything that Morrison gets credit for doing first in the DCU was actually done before!

I've been saying that for years.

Doesn't Jean Grey still go by Jean Grey after all of these year?

Figserello said:

As bad as Hornblower is as a name that might appear on the front of a comicbook, it sure beats ... Mal.

Travis Herrick said:

Doesn't Jean Grey still go by Jean Grey after all of these year?

She was Marvel Girl or Phoenix when I knew her.

...Yeah , " government-is-evil " - drowning it in the bathtub , speaking out against being " from Harvard " when you went to Harvard yourself , etc. - was more for the right side of the spectrum then !!!!!!!!!!!

Commander Benson said:

Mal was introduced in Teen Titans # 26 (Mar.-Apr., 1970), the second issue of editor Dick Giordano's experiment in relevancy on the TT title.

 

This phase, extending throughout 1970, put the Teen Titans through quite an upheaval.  Robin leaves the team.  The Hawk and the Dove join.  A socially conscious benefactor, Mr. Jupiter, takes over, and the youthful heroes abandon their costumes and super-powers.  Giordano's idea was for the Titans to tackle the concerns of "today's young people", i.e., protecting the environment, dealing with racial strife and corporate greed, government-is-evil, that sort of thing.  To do that, Giordano turned the TT from a team of super-protégés into a group of ordinary, "with-it" youths.

 

Mal was enlisted into the Titans during their initial foray under Jupiter's handling---an examination of the urban plight of the ghetto.  Under the circumstances of the Titans at the time, Mal fit right in and was, in fact, one of the stronger personalities.

 

However, Giordano's grand experiment didn't pay off where it counted---in sales.  Under orders of then-editorial director Carmine Infantino (if one goes by Giordano's account), costumes and super-powers began to creep back into the Titans' tales of relevancy.  And after seven issues, the whole idea was jettisoned, except for the on-going presence of Mr. Jupiter, and the Titans were back to being super-heroes, again.

 

This left Mal in an awkward situation.  He was just an ordinary youth in a drab grey uniform amidst the colourful costumes and flashy powers.  He didn't even have any abilities on a par with the archery skill of Speedy or the detective/acrobatic skills of Robin (who had rejoined the team).

 

In the remaining dozen issues of TT, before the series was cancelled in 1973, writer Bob Haney struggled to make Mal significant, but the fact was, he was even more of a fifth wheel to the team than Aqualad had been.  Not surprisingly, Mal suddenly became the guy left behind at headquarters to "coördinate things".  That is, when Haney didn't just omit him from the story completely.

 

 

...WHOOPER . Get one word wrog and you reverse your intended ( jest jokin' , heh , heh...) meaning:

" was more for the left side of the spectrum " is what I meant !!!!!!!!!!!

  Waaal , is my face red . Neither political meaning of that term , mind !!!!!!!!!!!

You could delete the comment and then repost it correctly.

Oops I noticed I skipped one a couple of days ago, so here we go.

Super-Villain Team-Up #4, 8, 9, 10, & 12

I'm sure this series had its fans, but to me it was: Boring! Boring! BORING! I refuse to re-read them, as I was barely able to make it through the last time. The most action of each issue occurred on the cover. These issues featured Dr. Doom, Namor, and Red Skull. Three people who never met a soliloquy they didn't love. Drove me batty.

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