Well here we are to my third box of unread comics. For those who haven't followed, theoretically I read a comic a day of comics I bought and never got around to reading. Some of them going back to the early '90s (well when I bought them I should say). I will review some of those comics. I tried to post one once a week, but I do get lazy. 

 

Enjoy!

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Philip Portelli said:

There was the rumor in 1976 when Ms. Marvel premiered that it was going to feature a more powerful Marvel Girl. IIRC, it was met with great disapproval.


Plus ca change!

Bester's The Demolished Man, which I've never gotten around to reading, is about a society in which telepathy is common.

I'm pretty sure I read it. It was a clever tale as far as I can remember. worth a read. I've also read most of "Stars, My Destination" which was a fun roller coaster ride. I'm terrible at finishing books. Even good ones.


Philip Portelli said:

One story had Kid Eternity summon Thomas Edison but he did use "older" heroes like Alexander Hamilton, Jesse James and Lord Byron.

 

Oh, sure, Philip, lots of Kid Eternity stories showed the Kid summoning figures from earlier centuries. I didn't elabourate enough in my earlier post. What I was driving at was addressing Mr. Herrick's comment about the Kid calling up Knute Rockne---as opposed to some figure from the past more well known as a warrior---to deal with the prison break.

It was in a case like that that I'm guessing the Kid Eternity writers would occasionally employ someone famous who had died within memory, or close to it, to make it easier for the readers to associate.

It isn't so much they Kid Eternity summoned someone that the reader could identify with that made me pause it was choosing a football coach and football coach to stop a prison break. I'll just chalk it up to being a story of it's time and not get too worried about it.

Weird War Tales #24

Apr. 1974

Cover Art: Luis Dominguez

Story: The Invisible Enemy

Writer: Jack Oleck

Art: Ernie Chua

Ten years after World War II ended a German lieutenant is freed from the bunker he was stuck in. We then flashback to what happened as a Gypsy Witch curses the soldier to die by a tiger as he commits his evil acts under the sign of the tiger. A Gypsy Witch? Is that some kind of cursing double major? Anyway, eventually he and his men find their way into a depot with a bunch of supplies. His sergeant attempts to escape when the door is blocked by some rubble. The lieutenant shoots him, telling everyone they are perfectly safe in the depot. That night the rest of the men try to kill the officer in his sleep. He awakens a kills them all with a machine gun.

Freed at last the officer sees some ghostly tigers, and they scare him so badly he falls over the edge of a building and dies.

Story: The Last Battle

Writer: Jack Oleck

Art: Alex Nino

In the future a dictator is trying to finally get complete control of the Earth. No matter what he does he just can't vanquish the last vestiges of revolt. He has a brilliant idea! He will declare war on the dead planet Mars. His propaganda machine goes into full hype mode and gets the people of Earth to fear and desire war against Mars. The dictator rallies the world and does send his armada of spaceships to Mars (along with himself). He is finally loved by everyone back home. All is well until hidden guns pop up from the Martian landscape and wipe all of them out.

This wasn't a bad issue per se, nor was it really good. It was really quite average. What kind of annoyed me was that few if any characters had names given to them. Just titles: lieutenant and dictator. Ernie Chua's art (better known as Ernie Chan) in the first story was really good, with a lot detail. I really liked it. Alex Nino's art on the other hand, I dunno my feelings for his art seem to change on the day of the week, here it was so stylized I didn't enjoy it so much.

Weird War Tales #41

Sept. 1975

Cover Art: Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez & Luis Dominguez

Story: The Dead Draftees of Regiment Six!

Writer: Michael Fleisher & Russell Carley

Art: Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez

A full length story this time. I'm so excited. Well the Union has enacted a draft law to add more men to their army. The catch is that if you can pay $300 or get someone to substitute for you then you don't have to serve. This sets up an easily abused system. Obviously the poor are the ones who are getting taken in to service. One of the men running an induction office in New York City uses his office as power to get money from people who can't quite pay the $300, but can pay him off a smaller amount. He then later drafts them anyways.

There is also a man named Mr. French who is an active abolitionist. He gets his draft summons, and later gets a young man, Tom Haynes, drunk. He then gets Tom to substitute for him. Mr. French tells Tom's sister that Tom insisted on volunteering, and that he was released from his obligation to continue his anti-slavery work. Tom is able to get assigned to non-combat duty.

Well that only works so long, until the Confederacy launches a massive attack, and Tom's regiment is ordered to fight them. Even though they are grossly outnumbered and untrained. They, the sixth regiment, get utterly annihilated. Their ghost's rise up however to exact their revenge.

They first get their revenge against the Union officer who sent them to their doom. They then go to New York City and kill the man running the induction office. This sets ablaze the armory, and riot begins in the city. People begin killing abolitionists and black people. Blaming them for draft that has been instated. Tom Haynes' ghost searches for and finds Mr. French. He hangs Mr. French in the barn. Tom Haynes then finds his sister has been hung as well. Thus these ghosts began the Draft Riots of 1863

Man, this was a dynamite issue. I like it when these stories are linked into real world events. The art by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez is top notch, but really I expected nothing less. A much better issue than the last issue reviewed. Plus, no World War II stories, and that is a bonus in my eyes.

I just might have one of these Weird War Tales left over in a small lot that I had been attempting to sell for a friend.

I'll have to go look to see if it's still around or if it's gone.

I don't remember that one -- you know I'm a sucker for José Luis García-Lopez artwork -- but I was always a sporadic buyer of those horror-mystery-ghost type comics. Buy 'em cheap, read 'em, and forget about 'em. But that sounds like one to savor.

...Yeah , my line about the Witching Hour SP appeared to show that many here feel like you !!!!!!!

This is definitely a series that goes down better in small doses, like a lot of those DC anthology of the time. It eventually feels like you are just slogging through it. I read about 15 issues before I stuck the rest into the next box, which was around another 10 issues or so. Just two more issues of Weird War Tales before we move on.

Weird War Tales #47
July-Aug. 1976
Cover Art: Joe Kubert


At this point the series is at a bi-monthly pace, but there were still some pretty good tales being spun.

Story: Bloodbath of the Toy Soldiers
Writer: George Kashdan
Art:  Rubeny

This is one of those stories with no date or place given. My guess it is supposed to be one of those “in the not to distant future” stories here on Earth. Here we have an evil general attempting to take over the world. A couple of his officers notice that the way his son has his toy soldiers set-up is the same as the enemy is set-up as well. His son also uses tactics that his father used that won him the battle. He then goes to his son to try and get winning tactics for their next encounter.

The two officers really don't like the idea of the general ruling the world, so once the kid goes to sleep they change the battlefield. It ends up sending them into a trap, and when the father comes home he in enraged and makes the boy put away the toys. Later he hears junior playing again. He rushes into the room and the boy pleads to let him keep his favorite one. The general throws it into the fire and he bursts into flames and melts away.

A pretty good story actually, and Rubeny's art was good as well. His faces went between pretty cartoony to realistic. He also has a lot of detail in the work. Fabulous.

Story: The Day After Doomsday
Story: Steve Skeates
Pencils: Paul Kirchner
Inks: Tex Blaisdell

The Day After  Doomsday was a semi-regular feature in Weird War Tales and usually just ran two pages. Actually, everyone I've seen is just two pages. They all take place in the near future after Doomsday as the title tells you. This one involves a man who hears the voice of a woman crying for help in some rubble. He digs her out only to find it is a tape recording that had been playing. The dude get mad and smashes the recorder and a weakened wall collapses on him.

Meh.

Story: The Warrior
Writer: Jack Oleck
Art: Ricardo Villamonte


This story is about a the son of a viking leader, Eric,  who is quite the coward. Another, older viking gives him a shield that he tells him was once owned by Thor. He tells the  Eric that the shield is magical and will protect him in combat. Now with the confidence of a new shield he eagerly rejoins his viking brethren on a new attack. He gets killed. The older viking pulls put another shield of “Thor” to give to the next coward.

Not a bad story. Another one with really good art. All crammed into 6 pages.

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