Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Another Doc Ock.

My most vivid Doctor Octopus cover!

This is another Marvel tag along the lines of "The story YOU demanded!"

Why did it have to happen?  Seriously, there are seven zillion metahumans on Marvel-Earth. Why did Cap have to battle Doc Ock? And what's with Cap's face on that cover? Is he thinking, "$@#!  I should've been prepared for those tentacles! My battling Doc Ock was something that had to happen, and here I am, unprepared...."

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Another Doc Ock.

"Why did it have to happen?"

I took it to mean any two given characters who have been around since the early days of the Marvel Age were bound to square off eventually.

Why? In story, Doc wanted to steal Cap's shield to learn its secrets so he could augment his arms and make himself "unstoppable"!

JD DeLuzio said:

This is another Marvel tag along the lines of "The story YOU demanded!"

Why did it have to happen?  Seriously, there are seven zillion metahumans on Marvel-Earth. Why did Cap have to battle Doc Ock? And what's with Cap's face on that cover? Is he thinking, "$@#!  I should've been prepared for those tentacles! My battling Doc Ock was something that had to happen, and here I am, unprepared...."

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Another Doc Ock.

"Omaha" the Cat Dancer was an erotic comic strip and later comic book created by artist Reed Waller and writer Kate Worley. Set in fictional Mipple City, Minnesota (derived from "MPLS," the old postal abbreviation for Minneapolis) in a universe populated by anthropomorphic funny animal characters, the strip was a soap opera focusing on Omaha, a feline exotic dancer, and her lover, Chuck, the son of a business tycoon.

The strip debuted in the funny animal magazine Vootie, and a number of underground comix in the late 1970s and early 1980s. "Omaha" the Cat Dancer became the subject of the eponymous comic book series published from 1984 to 1993 by Kitchen Sink Press; it was relaunched by Fantagraphics Books through 1995. The final chapters of the strip's storyline were published in Sizzle magazine, beginning in 2006.

"Omaha" the Cat Dancer was the first of several comic books published in the early 1980s which integrated explicit sex into their storylines, rather than utilizing sex for shock value. The comic was the subject of a number of obscenity controversies, and was nominated for multiple Eisner Awards in 1989 and 1991.  (Source Wikipedia)

Seems to me that during the Silver & Bronze ages, Marvel villains tended to swap sparring partners much more frequently than DC villains, but there were at least a few prominent, recurring baddies who rarely if ever showed up in a mag that didn't star the hero they first fought against.  The Red Skull and Green Goblin are the most prominent I can think of right off.  Outside of Captain America and the Invaders, the only other mags I recall the Red Skull showing up in were a Spider-Man Annual (and now I can't remember if that was the genuine Red Skull or the '50s Commie pretending to be him) and in Astonishing Tales and Super-Villain Team-Up, taking on Dr.Doom.


Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Why did it have to happen?"

I took it to mean any two given characters who have been around since the early days of the Marvel Age were bound to square off eventually.

I agree, it was more a Marvel thing.  Everybody at some point fought Dr. Doom.  A few DC instances do come to mind, but considering how many more comics and characters DC had back then those few prove the case.

Catwoman in Lois Lane #79 (with The Penguin), and Wonder Woman #201 & 202.

Weather Wizard in Detective #353.

Arnold Hugo fought both Batman and Martian Manhunter.

Was the Cat-Man who fought Blackhawk the same character who fought Batman?

Star Sapphire in Superman #261.

And possibly Egg Fu from Wonder Woman and his robot twin, Dr. Yes, in Metal Men could count.

Maybe there are a few others, but those are the ones that I can remember.  Not many.

Fred W. Hill said:

Seems to me that during the Silver & Bronze ages, Marvel villains tended to swap sparring partners much more frequently than DC villains, but there were at least a few prominent, recurring baddies who rarely if ever showed up in a mag that didn't star the hero they first fought against.  The Red Skull and Green Goblin are the most prominent I can think of right off.  Outside of Captain America and the Invaders, the only other mags I recall the Red Skull showing up in were a Spider-Man Annual (and now I can't remember if that was the genuine Red Skull or the '50s Commie pretending to be him) and in Astonishing Tales and Super-Villain Team-Up, taking on Dr.Doom.


Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Why did it have to happen?"

I took it to mean any two given characters who have been around since the early days of the Marvel Age were bound to square off eventually.

A few others:

In the Silver Age Dr. Light bounced around a bit before he became a joke.

The Gentleman Ghost, traditionally Hawkman’s foe, fought Batman in #310.

The Trickster appeared in Black Lightning  #10 (first series), as well as in Blue Devil — it looks like Blue Devil eventually fought a bunch of Flash’s rogues gallery.

The Calculator’s schtick was to fight different heroes.

The Shade moved into Starman, but that may not have been the same character who fought the Golden Age Flash, and it was probably later than the Bronze Age.  After the Bronze Age, things get more fluid at DC, especially, with more “events” bringing together mobs of characters

Another Doc Ock.

A Gold Key teamup:  O. G. Whiz and Tubby!

'Nuff said.

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