Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Then there was the time that X-ray vision came up against Penetra vision.

Xom.

I guess I'll go for the obvious:

BTW, I love how Lois Lane has a monogrammed "LL" top. I suspect Superman must have a drawer of those for friend and foe birthdays,



Philip Portelli said:

More X-Ray Visions!

And....

This comic is from 1958, which is when I started reading the Super books. Using x-ray vision to heat things was what I remember as the standard back then. The power called "heat vision" was named at a later date. Maybe a child went to the dentist and was afraid the dentist would cook him/her, so Weisinger came up with the separate power.  

Steve W said:

And who can forget the day that Clark tried to transfer his favourite visual superpower to his adoptive parents (why?).

My favourite X-Men cover, a Neal Adams extravaganza. X-Men #59 came out in the US in August 1969, and in the UK roughly one year later. I remember buying it during the summer  holidays, in the year when I moved up from primary school to secondary school.  I remember reading the story and thinking "Wow, I've read this, I understand it, and I'm now ready for 'grown-ups' school."  Oh happy days!

Doctor Double X was one of the few Bat-villains that had actual super-powers which was really a disadvantage as it kept him out of Batman's world after his "New Look". His costume didn't help. Maybe if he had fought the Flash or Green Lantern?

Xenozoic Tales.  Many great covers, here’s one.

Valiant introduced X-O Monowar in 1992, prompting Marvel to sue. Marvel had tried to copyright (or was it trademark?) the letter “X”.

That prompted Valiant to borrow “X-Caliber” from Steve Englehart…

…a creator-owned character Marvel had allowed, thus setting precedent.

The selections I had picked for Xenozoic Tales and X-O Manowar (with Solar)

And, of course, the Comics Code prevented Doctor Triple X from ever becoming a major player in the Silver Age.

Philip Portelli said:

Doctor Double X was one of the few Bat-villains that had actual super-powers which was really a disadvantage as it kept him out of Batman's world after his "New Look". His costume didn't help. Maybe if he had fought the Flash or Green Lantern?

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