Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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I wanted to find the original cover. It turns out that it's this 1989 cover which apparently was used in 1992 for the translated comic.

 

JD DeLuzio said:

O Homem Aranha experiences some difficulties as Christmas approaches....

Here's the cover of the legendary Adventure #300 in Italian. "Nembo Kid" seemed to stand for both Superman and Superboy in Italy.

Adventure #247 in Greek. Is there any part of the known world that the LSH didn't reach?

I haven't yet come across any any pre 1989 covers in Russian.  I guess the comics started to flood in after the wall came down.

And I always thought that 'Silver Surfer' was a cool name, but now  I think Estela Plateada is even cooler.

Interesting to note that "revista para adultos" literally translates from Spanish as "Magazine for Adults". Many of the Spanish speaking covers carried this instruction.  Who was it addressed to? The vendor - the newsagent selling the book, or the buyer - the person picking it up off the rack.  Was this instruction enforced? Why were comics, deliberately sold to teenagers and pre-teenagers in the US and UK, specifically aimed at adults only in Spanish speaking countries? Or was the instruction deliberately put there by the publishers to increase demand from younger people for the comics? After all there was very little that was salacious in any of these comics.

I had wondered about this myself. Perhaps they put this on the cover to protect the publisher. All countries have different standards. Some are heavily influenced by the predominant religious views in their country.

I know that readers in the U.S. have been cautioned about taking Japanese manga in print or digital form into Canada. They look at laptop contents at the border! I haven't been able to find an article that compares countries and their censorship. 

Steve W said:

Interesting to note that "revista para adultos" literally translates from Spanish as "Magazine for Adults". Many of the Spanish speaking covers carried this instruction.  Who was it addressed to? The vendor - the newsagent selling the book, or the buyer - the person picking it up off the rack.  Was this instruction enforced? Why were comics, deliberately sold to teenagers and pre-teenagers in the US and UK, specifically aimed at adults only in Spanish speaking countries? Or was the instruction deliberately put there by the publishers to increase demand from younger people for the comics? After all there was very little that was salacious in any of these comics.

Justice League #183, from Germany

Hombre Arana meets I Can't Believe It's Not Vampirella!

It says Vampirella, but is it really Vampirella? From Argentina, a retouched Frazetta cover.

It seems that it wasn't only the US that adopted those checkerboard tops for DC covers in the late 60s.

So did Superman Bi!

With Vampirella hanging about, perhaps it's time for Buffy to put in an appearance.

It's all Greek to me.

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