Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Archie: "Wow!  I guess anything's possible!"

Maybe.  But let's not comment on which of these covers is more plausible...

Jeff of Earth-J said:

We're nearly half-way through the month, which brings me to my favourite bete noir. The constant "imaginary story" in the silver age, that Supes and Lois got together, procreated, and produced a live offspring.  Even when I was 12, I could see lots of biological issues with this particular imaginary story. 

One - Lois Lane is a human - an earthling. She produces eggs each month, and these eggs can only be fertilised by one thing - human sperm.

Two - Superman is an alien. He hails from the planet Krypton, a planet infinitesimally distant from our own planet.  He has super-powers. The chances of his DNA being anything remotely like Lois's is too small to calculate. I reckon that Lois would have more DNA in common with a banana than she would with Supes.  So why, why, why were we constantly subjected to this 'imaginary story'? If you saw a cover with Lois cuddling a baby that she and E.T. had managed to produce together you'd undoubtedly be horrified!

I can suspend belief in lots of things when I'm reading comics, but the suspension of basic biological facts was beyond my remit - even when I was 12!

Steve W said:

We're nearly half-way through the month, which brings me to my favourite bete noir. The constant "imaginary story" in the silver age, that Supes and Lois got together, procreated, and produced a live offspring.

For a more detailed discussion of problems with this scenario, I recommend Larry Niven's 1969 essay "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex".



Steve W said:

The chances of his DNA being anything remotely like Lois's is too small to calculate. I reckon that Lois would have more DNA in common with a banana than she would with Supes.  So why, why, why were we constantly subjected to this 'imaginary story'? If you saw a cover with Lois cuddling a baby that she and E.T. had managed to produce together you'd undoubtedly be horrified!

I see your point, but Kal-El is a convincing-looking replica of an earthling so he can't be that different. Star Trek at one point theorized that humans and human-like aliens may be so similar because they were "seeded" millennia ago from the same source (either that or the limited special effects budget). A horse and a donkey can make a baby. A lion and a tiger can make a baby. Like them, if Lois and Supes made a baby the baby likely wouldn't be able to reproduce.

The thing about this cover that amazes me is the rolling pin. Lois must throw harder than any pitcher/bowler to have it break like that. If she married a regular guy he'd be dead! 

"The Girl Who Refused to Marry Superman!", according to the synopsis on dc.fandom.com, is Superman's  dream induced by red kryptonite. That's some mild red K. I guess, being invulnerable, he wouldn't have a bad dream induced by the wrong pizza topping. The dream doesn't answer the question, which wouldn't mean anything anyway, but my vote would be Lois refusing and Lana loving him anyway.



Richard Willis said:



Steve W said:

The chances of his DNA being anything remotely like Lois's is too small to calculate. I reckon that Lois would have more DNA in common with a banana than she would with Supes.  So why, why, why were we constantly subjected to this 'imaginary story'? If you saw a cover with Lois cuddling a baby that she and E.T. had managed to produce together you'd undoubtedly be horrified!

I see your point, but Kal-El is a convincing-looking replica of an earthling so he can't be that different. Star Trek at one point theorized that humans and human-like aliens may be so similar because they were "seeded" millennia ago from the same source (either that or the limited special effects budget). A horse and a donkey can make a baby. A lion and a tiger can make a baby. Like them, if Lois and Supes made a baby the baby likely wouldn't be able to reproduce.

Lions and tigers, horses and donkeys, are closely related, having diverged in (comparatively) recent times, evolutionarily speaking. Chimps and orangutans? Nope. Anteaters and spiny anteaters? Sharks and dolphins? Lizards and salamander? Not even closely related-- they just look similar.

Two creatures from different planets that happen to look alike? Not happening, even, if, as Trek suggests, the different planets were seeded back in the "primordial soup" days by a super-race.

Of course, given that Superman can fly and shoot lasers from his eyes, and Lois has, as you have noted, the best throwing arm in Metropolis, and probably should be a major league pitcher, I'm going to let this one go as well. Although I also recommend Larry Niven's hilariously disturbing little essay, mentioned earlier by Peter Wrexham.

So even in non-imaginary (???) continuity, they can get married and lead a normal life, as other couples do.

This is the synopsis on dc.fandom.com for "I Am Curious (Black)!"

"To get a story about life in Little Africa, a black ghetto in Metropolis, Lois Lane has Superman use a transformation machine designed by Dahr-Nel to turn her into a black woman. During her stay there, she meets neighborhood activist Dave Stevens, and helps save his life with a transfusion of her own blood after he is shot by drug dealers. When he awakens, and sees she has become a white woman again, he accepts her sacrifice nonetheless with gratitude."

Wikipedia's entry on her comic book series says:

"By the 1970s, the stories began to reflect growing social awareness: Lois became less fixated on romance and more on current issues. In the controversial story "I Am Curious (Black)!" in #106 (November 1970), Lois uses a machine that allows her to experience racism firsthand as an African American woman."

The first entry doesn't mention racism. The second doesn't mention the shooting or the blood transfusion. Did anyone here actually read this story?

I remember being transfixed by "I am Curious (Black)" when I first bought the comic back in 1971. Although now of course, with the benefit of hindsight, it seems like a very insulting thing to do, back then it was groundbreaking and illuminating.  I devoured the story, and felt somehow, that I had learned something and grown more mature having read it.  I was 13 at the time, so very impressionable.

It was a bit like "Love Thy Neighbour" which was on UK TV four months later. Now universally decried as racist, at the time it seemed to be breaking down doors and prejudices. 

Although well-recognized by comic fans for his painted covers, the psychological effects of George Wilson's constant harassment by the kid next door sometimes seeped into his art. Here, he subtextually presents the conception of Dennis Mitchell as a horrific spectacle:

“Officer, his name is Harvey.”

Indian papoose??? Superman, it's a baby! 

After the controversial Lois Lane #106, our Intrepid Girl Reporter was at it again, this time championing Native American rights. Or "Indians" at the time! Then, and probably now, most people thought that all Native Americans still lived on reservations, wore buckskins and went on warpaths!

And shed a tear over pollution.

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