Ok, how about this for an idea.  We take it in turns to post a favourite (British spelling) comic cover every day.  This went really well on the comic fan website that I used to frequent.  What we tried to do was find a theme or subject and follow that, until we all got bored with that theme.  I'd like to propose a theme of letters of the alphabet. So, for the remainder of October (only 5 days) and all of November, we post comic cover pictures associated with the letter "A".  Then in December, we post covers pertaining to the letter "B".  The association to the letter can be as tenuous as you want it to be. For example I could post a cover from "Adventure Comics" or "Amazing Spider Man".  However Spider Man covers can also be posted when we're on the letter "S".  Adventure Comic covers could also be posted when we're on the letter "L" if they depict the Legion of Super Heroes.  So, no real hard, fast rules - in fact the cleverer the interpretation of the letter, the better, as far as I'm concerned.

And it's not written in stone that we have to post a cover every day. There may be some days when no cover gets posted. There's nothing wrong with this, it just demonstrates that we all have lives to lead.

If everyone's in agreement I'd like to kick this off with one of my favourite Action Comic covers, from January 1967. Curt Swan really excelled himself here.

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Peter's statement about comics unsold in the U.S. being shipped to the U.K. doesn't fit with what I know. Unsold comics in the U.S. (when they were still returnable) would be stripped of their covers. The covers were returned to the publisher for credit and the rest of the comics were supposed to be destroyed. Some would be illegally sold as coverless, but if the U.S. comics you were buying seemed brand new and had covers they were probably always intended for the U.K.

After the Army joined me and sent me to Vietnam, we had a PX (post exchange - a small store). Even though we had no plumbing, I bought a self-winding watch there that lasted for 40 years. I also bought comics there every week. Like you describe, they were about three months behind. I suspect that these were also always intended for us. They were just shipped the cheapest way possible - - hence the delay. This wasn't all bad because it made me try other titles from Charlton, etc, that I hadn't been buying already.

"E" is for E-Man. I remember specifically I got this one for being good at the dentist. 

E-Man, definitely one of my favorites.  At the time I hoped it would lead to an explosion of new superheroes, and some revivals, from Charlton.  Alas, it didn’t necessary come to pass but we did end up with some interesting titles, such as Yang, House of Yang, Vengeance Squad, Doomsday +1, a reinvigorated Phantom and Rog 2000.  I actually subscribed to E-Man so as to not miss an issue—Charlton’s distribution was always hit and miss.  They were mailed flat not folded.

Continuing the doctor/dentist visit theme.  I believe I got this issue of Midnight Tales after a doctor’s visit.  I was hooked.  Nick Cuti stories, Joe Staton, Tom Sutton, and Wayne Howard art.  How could you go wrong?

As a premium with your Charlton subscription you received this guide—I still have it.

I submitted stories to Charlton.  Nothing was accepted, but I did get a nice postcard signed by Nick Cuti.

My comic reading as a kid had as much to do with "EC echo" horror comics. I found Gold Key's painted covers fascinating, and this one works so well that Dark Horse reused it for an archive:

"F" is for Flash and "G" is for Gordon. I got this beautiful example of Al Williamson artwork in one of King's "three-packs" along with issues of The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician

Christmas '72 also had me get my very first Marvel comic which was my introduction to both Spider-Man and Thor!

Also there's a scene in it that still gives me pause!

Continuing the dentist visit theme, the spirit on the cover needs some dental work.

JD DeLuzio said:

My comic reading as a kid had as much to do with "EC echo" horror comics. I found Gold Key's painted covers fascinating, and this one works so well that Dark Horse reused it for an archive:

I so want this guide - am going to check out ebay right now. Great cover too...

Dave Palmer said:

As a premium with your Charlton subscription you received this guide—I still have it.

I submitted stories to Charlton.  Nothing was accepted, but I did get a nice postcard signed by Nick Cuti.

Keats E. Petree (21 September 1919 – 26 November 1997) was an American illustrative artist with significant contributions to both pulp magazines and comic strips in the 1940s and 1950s. His works were primarily in color, as inked strips and both oil and watercolor paintings. Petree's most memorable comic book credits were for the later comic versions of Sally the Sleuth, a pulp comic strip heroine created originally by Adolphe Barreaux in 1934 in Spicy Detective Stories, but his greatest recognition was earned by his pulp color work for the Queenie Starr series, also in Spicy Detective Stories. Other notable Petree work included The Lone Ranger (Dell/Western), Girl Friday (Trojan), the Sally the Sleuth pulp installment entitled Blonde Decoy (in this case for Private Detective Stories, August 1950), Wilma West: The Range Runs Red (Leading Western, September, 1950), a daily strip and Sunday strip in the fifties, Nick Haliday, and a wide variety of other pulp and comic issues. He also produced an undetermined number of non-genre oil and watercolor paintings.

He also drew this amazing cover. The perspective is astonishing.

"H" is for Hulk. #167 was not only my first Hulk, but #168 was my first consecutive issue if any title ever (and it has a great cover, too). If you wanna talk about perspective, look at either of these.

I say #167 was my first Hulk, but I bought MSH #38 on the same day (picked 'em both out myself). I don't count it as my "first" because it was a reprint, even if the story had originally appeared years earlier. (That's a nice perspective shot, too, come to think of it.)

This is the issue that revealed/retconned Brainiac from a flesh-and-blood alien to an extremely advanced humanoid robot.

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