Am I the only comics fan who's NOT all that worked up over the MCU?  I've seen at most a third of the MCU pictures and have no real great desire to see any of the rest of them,  (I haven't seen any DC movies either, not since the Batman one that killed Heath Ledger.)

Don't get me wrong, I'm not against them, the few I've seen were mostly OK, and if people are enjoying the others, good for them, but I just can't get worked up over them. It's just that I see people here and on social media getting all worked up over Avengers: Endgame like it's this big epochal event, and I'm starting to seriously wonder if there's something wrong with me as a comics fan (I know there's plenty of things wrong with me in other areas) because I really just don't care about it. I mean, I love the Avengers as a concept. With the League and the Society, they're one of my three favorite super-teams.

I'm not fed up with super-heroes or anything  - I love One-Punch Man and My Hero Academia.

I just feel like the odd one out, because I just don't get it.

Views: 551

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I was never a big fan of those Superman movies starring Christopher Reeve. There is a common perception that the first two are so very good and the second two are so very bad, but I find them all to be of a kind. I continued to watch the Batman movies throughout the ‘90s, despite the fact they became increasingly insipid. Also, they were overburdened by the need to detail each character’s origin. When they made Superman Returns, the director made a point that it was a sequel to the first two and ignored the second two. I personally believe he made that announcement simply to bypass excessive screen time devoted to retelling the origin story. (It didn’t help that the movie was crap.)

I had pretty much given up on superhero movies until the first Hulk movie came out. Having been my first favorite character, I felt I owed it to myself to see it. It was crap. I continued to see movies based on ‘80s comics I enjoyed: Wolverine, Fantastic Four, Daredevil, Elektra, Green Lantern. They were all pretty much crap. I think I continued to go see them because it was “expected of me” by my friends. These days, whenever I tell them I haven’t seen the latest super-hero movie and they protest, “But you like comic book,” I have learned to say, “But those aren’t comic books.”

When the Marvel movies started to come out, I did see some of them: the first Captain America one, the first Thor one, one of Iron Man ones (but I’m not sure which), the Avengers one with the schawrma. Like the DC movies, they were overburdened with telling the origin. (In hindsight, if I had known they’d last as long as they have, I should have skipped the early ones and waited for the later ones. Oh, well… too late now.) I hate the Spider-Man ones most of all. He keeps taking off his mask! That completely kills my willing suspension of disbelief. Nothing says “Hollywood” to me more than the desire to show an actor’s pretty face.

Oh, I saw the two Guardians of the Galaxy movies, too, but I don’t really consider those “Marvel movies.” A couple of months ago, a co-worker was talking about “that Marvel movie,” “that Marvel movie.” Turns out she was referring to Aquaman. Just yesterday, my wife was telling me about a client of hers who was raving about a movie she had just seen: “The big one about the cartoons.” I find those typical reactions of non-comics-reading viewers.

Last summer I took an international flight and caught up on several of the more recent ones (Black Panther, Doctor Strange, Ant-Man), but they didn’t stick with me. Last month I saw Captain Marvel and thought it was the best Marvel movie of those I have seen. It makes such a good lead-in to the new Avengers movie (which I do intend to see, BTW, in a few weeks after the crowds die down) that it renders all the others superfluous. I will be curious to learn why Carol Danvers hasn’t appeared to age since 1995.

Do you know, I haven't seen the Christopher Reeve movies since I saw them in the theaters?  He looked the part, but he was never "Superman" for me the way George Reeves was.

I always thought this 40's Superman ad looked a bit like Christopher Reeve.

Oh yeah! That's the one I am waiting for. I already warned my wife to be ready to see it. Truth be told, she enjoyed Kong of Skull Island and the associated Godzilla, so it shouldn't take a whole of convincing for her to go.

The Baron said:

And, yeah, I am saving my pennies to see the new Godzilla picture when it comes out at the end of the month.

I have absolutely no idea why whoever was in charge chose the direction they did between the second two Christopher Reeve Superman outings and the two non-Tim Burton Batman movies before that series was rebooted.

I still watch the later Reeve outings, but don't find them as enjoyable as the first two.

To this day, I still find it totally ironic that everyone was afraid that Burton and Michael Keaton teaming up would take Batman back to the camp days of the 1960s, when it was Burton's replacement that did that!

...I've seen every DCEU movie bar SHAZAM!, which I want to see - I'm in the hospital now.
I have 't seen ENDGAME yet, I want to. I haven't seem perhaps the majority of the MCU films. There's so many of them.
I have seen the three previous AVENGERS films, which I guess are the " mothershio/Sunday strips " if the whole series? - I.e., that you can get a general overview of the whole MCU story arc by watching them, they're the " main " ones.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I have absolutely no idea why whoever was in charge chose the direction they did between the second two Christopher Reeve Superman outings and the two non-Tim Burton Batman movies before that series was rebooted.

I still watch the later Reeve outings, but don't find them as enjoyable as the first two.

Regarding the first and second Superman movies with Christopher Reeve, I'd say those two were more consistent in tone than the others because they were largely filmed at the same time.* But original director Richard Donner was replaced with Richard Lester, who re-shot a lot of the footage in Superman II, the better to get director's credit. Superman III is all Lester, and the difference is glaring. I've said this once or twice before, but I'll say it again: I've seen worse movies before then, and worse movies since then, but Superman III was the first movie that made me feel like I got robbed. It was years before I stopped wanting to get my money back. 

And Superman IV: The Quest for Peace suffered from the combination of Christopher Reeve wanting to make a grand statement about nuclear disarmament, a studio without the resources to bring that vision to life, and a monstrously crappy script.

*However, the producers didn't tell the actors they were making two movies at once. And that wasn't the first time they pulled that trick; they did it when they made 1973's The Three Musketeers and 1974's sequel The Four Musketeers. After subsequent litigation, actors' contracts now stipulate how many movies they're doing.

Also, that stunt was part of the reason Gene Hackman wasn't in Superman III and was replaced with Robert Vaughn.

Lee Houston, Junior said:

I have absolutely no idea why whoever was in charge chose the direction they did between the second two Christopher Reeve Superman outings and the two non-Tim Burton Batman movies before that series was rebooted.

CK answered most of the Superman question. I don't think I've heard that "two-movies-for-one-salary" explanation before, but it makes sense. I'm not clear on why they replaced Richard Donner. I enjoyed the first two Chris Reeve movies, gritting my teeth during the campy Lex Luthor and minions parts. I vaguely remember some of the Richard Pryor bits in the third movie. I saw the fourth movie but remember absolutely nothing about it.

I believe the breaking point for the powers that be on the Tim Burton Batman movies was when The Penguin bit off a guy's nose. The marketers of toys saw this as bad for business and that was it for Burton. I don't think Michael Keaton wanted to play the character with a new director. The third Batman movie was the Jim Carrey Show and wasted both Tommy Lee Jones and his character Two-Face. The fourth movie had good casting but a bad campy script.

“There was a time when special effects first got to the point where a comic could be properly translated to the screen.”

Funny you should mention that. For years I used Alan Zelenetz’s introductory remarks to the 1983 reprint of “The Kree/Skrull War” to justify why I prefer (superhero) comic books to movies. It’s a bit dated now, but I made my choice years ago and haven’t really changed my opinion.

“FROM BEYOND THE GALAXY TO WITHIN THESE PAGES” by Alan Zelenetz

“As far-out and fantastic as movies are these days, with extraterrestrials and barbarians walking around any nuber of outer space worlds, you would think there’s nothing beyond the capabilities of filmmaking. Well, consider what you hold in your hands—Marvel’s ‘Kree-Skrull War’, originally presented in the Avengers a decade ago. It’s an epic so grand, only the comics could bring it to you.

“I’m serious. Even in this age of megabuck movie-making, the price tag for a production of this magnitude would probably trail its digits from the Milky Way (where Avengers Mansion can be found, by the way) to the Greater Magellanic (home galaxy of the Kree Empire) and back. Think of it. Special effects light years ahead of Skywalker and company—we’re talking the devolution of Alaskan ice tundras into a savage tropics, a fantastic voyage through the innards of an android, shape-shifting aliens, Omni-Wave Projectors (don’t ask what they do, just savor the ominousness of the name), holograms, gleaming starships of galactic empires, mandroids in titanium-powered exoskeletons, a Great Refuge of Inhumans, ethercraft armed with nuclear warheads, the clash of intergalactic armadas in the gulfs of outer space. And location shots—from capr Canaveral to New York City, the Tibetan Himalayas, the Milky Way, the Kree and Skrull galaxies, the Negative Zone. And then, consider the number of wardrobe people you’d need to costume all those super heroes. And not just any super heroes, mind you, but Earth’s mightiest, the cream of the crop, the Avengers—Thor and Iron Man and captain America, the Vision and Scarlet Witch, all assisted by a then vigorous Captain Marvel (may he rest in peace).

“Like I said, there’s not a studio that could touch this property—why we’re talking maybe jillions here. (Super heroes don’t come at union wages, y’know, not to mention that the SPFX department would be asking for.) But—and say Amen to it—there’s no need to budget jillions when your production’s four-color. Simple as that. It just doesn’t cost a bundle to transport cast and crew around the globe and into far-off galaxies when you can cover the distance with the turn of a page. So the only limits are those of the unfettered imagination, and of such artistic license are great things born—like the ‘Kree-Skrull War’ of 1971-72 re-presented here and well-deserving of the reprint honors. For this grand space opera, this sprawling, cracking-good multi-part adventure yarn—whose theme is nothing less than ‘two galaxies battlin’ it out for the Earht’ (to quote spade-callin’ Rick Jones, a key participant therein)—this is comics at its most epic. This is the source. Go on, look at these pages. Artists Neal Adams, John Buscema and Tom Palmer at the top of their form, eh? Joined by Roy Thomas whose highly acclaimed eight-year stint on The Avengers reaches its peak right here. The original version of this sage took the public by storm, and now a decade later it’s become myth and legend (as well as a tongue-twister of infinite subtlety. I wish I had a silver dollar for every time I’ve called it the ‘Skree-Krull War’).

“Okay, I’ve had my say. Here’s Avengers #89-97, the ‘Kree-Skrull War’—an epic so grand, only the comics could bring it to you!”

With respect to the question "Am I the only one?", let me tell you a story ... 

I remember seeing a little item in my local newspaper years ago, about Hollywood producer Michael Uslan's plan to make a big-budget movie based on Batman. I knew the name Michael Uslan because he wrote a few Batman comics and an issue or two of The Shadow for DC. So I looked forward to seeing the movie and finally did ...

... eleven years later.

Having waited that long to see Batman, the movie, I HAD to like it. I liked it for everything that was good about it and despite everything that was bad about it, like the rubber costume, the wrong Bat-emblem on the chest, the machine guns on the Batmobile, etc. (I remember that while it was in production, my friendly neighborhood comic shop was one of many circulating a petition protesting the casting of Michael Keaton as Batman. I don't remember if I signed it.)

I think to some degree that mindset is at work for the fans of many a superhero movie, or many a movie of other types. But I get why that kind of intense devotion is baffling to someone who doesn't share it. For my part, I am so uninterested in the new Star Wars movies I can barely muster the energy to say those words.

On a wholly different note, am I the only one who hasn't been able to keep this song out of his head since this thread started?

I like that song.

Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) said:

On a wholly different note, am I the only one who hasn't been able to keep this song out of his head since this thread started?

I like the Star Wars pictures OK, I'll go to see them (Except Han and Chewie Go To White Castle, or whatever it was called, that was going to the well once too often.), but I'm not counting the days, or anything.  

As someone who likes to pretend he can write, I'm curious to see how they write around the death of Carrie Fisher.

ClarkKent_DC said:

For my part, I am so uninterested in the new Star Wars movies I can barely muster the energy to say those words.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service