Am I the only comics fan who's NOT all that worked up over the MCU?  I've seen at most a third of the MCU pictures and have no real great desire to see any of the rest of them,  (I haven't seen any DC movies either, not since the Batman one that killed Heath Ledger.)

Don't get me wrong, I'm not against them, the few I've seen were mostly OK, and if people are enjoying the others, good for them, but I just can't get worked up over them. It's just that I see people here and on social media getting all worked up over Avengers: Endgame like it's this big epochal event, and I'm starting to seriously wonder if there's something wrong with me as a comics fan (I know there's plenty of things wrong with me in other areas) because I really just don't care about it. I mean, I love the Avengers as a concept. With the League and the Society, they're one of my three favorite super-teams.

I'm not fed up with super-heroes or anything  - I love One-Punch Man and My Hero Academia.

I just feel like the odd one out, because I just don't get it.

Views: 543

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

"Am I the only one who hasn't been able to keep this song out of his head since this thread started?"

For me it's been The Only One by Chicago.

Never heard that one...! And now that I have, it still hasn't dislodged Melissa Etheridge, whose groove on this track goes way down deep in me. 

As for the subject at hand, there was a long period when I had no interest in superhero movies -- never saw Daredevil, never saw Elektra, never saw Catwoman or Spawn or Steel or what-have-you. But Iron Man really did rekindle my interest in those movies, and while I haven't seen them all since there (there are two MCU movies I haven't seen since then, and I've never seen an Andrew Garfield Spider-Man, or any of the latter-day X-Men films...not to mention Superman v Batman or Green Lantern) -- ultimately I feel like I can trust the MCU. I know going in that I'll be entertained, and in some cases, I'll be inspired and uplifted. They've got a great track record, and since I started giving them the benefit of the doubt they haven't let me down, never falling below the baseline of competent adventure entertainment. (Which doesn't seem like too much of compliment, until you check out some of the slapdash DC movies.)


The Baron said:

I like the Star Wars pictures OK, I'll go to see them (Except Han and Chewie Go To White Castle, or whatever it was called, that was going to the well once too often.), but I'm not counting the days, or anything.  

I think the movie Solo: A Star Wars Story mainly suffered from the public's not buying anyone playing Han except Harrison Ford, particularly after the previous movie killed the character. I think I might pay to see Han and Chewie Go To White Castle, though.

As someone who likes to pretend he can write, I'm curious to see how they write around the death of Carrie Fisher.

The last I heard, they have footage of Carrie Fisher (or someone motion-captured as her) that will be in Episode 9. They could have her die or not, since this is allegedly the final movie of the narrative. I expect they will either make more stand-alone films like Solo and Rogue One or do what they'e done with Mickey and Donald (just merchandise and theme park areas).

ClarkKent_DC said:

I remember that while it was in production, my friendly neighborhood comic shop was one of many circulating a petition protesting the casting of Michael Keaton as Batman. I don't remember if I signed it.

I was never one who was against Michael Keaton playing Batman. Even though most of his work up to then was comedy, I was aware that the previous year he had starred in and had good reviews for the serious drama Clean and Sober.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Funny you should mention that. For years I used Alan Zelenetz’s introductory remarks to the 1983 reprint of “The Kree/Skrull War” to justify why I prefer (superhero) comic books to movies. It’s a bit dated now, but I made my choice years ago and haven’t really changed my opinion.

As you say, this comment from 36 years ago is a bit dated. Since then, CGI has evolved to the point where expensive sets and costumes can be created in a computer.

The best example of world-building by CGI, IMO, is the 20+ year old series Babylon 5. The many ambitious sets were all inside the computer, with the actors working in a green-screen room.

A friend’s wife told me the other day that “comic books” is now its own genre.

No, “comic books” is a medium; “super-heroes” is a genre.

What we have been discussing here are super-hero movies.

My favorite comic book movie is Comic Book Villains.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Funny you should mention that. For years I used Alan Zelenetz’s introductory remarks to the 1983 reprint of “The Kree/Skrull War” to justify why I prefer (superhero) comic books to movies. It’s a bit dated now, but I made my choice years ago and haven’t really changed my opinion.


Richard Willis said:

As you say, this comment from 36 years ago is a bit dated. Since then, CGI has evolved to the point where expensive sets and costumes can be created in a computer.

The best example of world-building by CGI, IMO, is the 20+ year old series Babylon 5. The many ambitious sets were all inside the computer, with the actors working in a green-screen room.

I marveled at the movie The Walk from 2015, which told of the time Phillip Petit walked a tightrope between both towers of the World Trade Center in New York. The location, of course, was recreated on a set with green screen

I haven't seen The Walk -- thanks for reminding me it existed -- but if you ever get a chance to see the 2008 documentary Man on Wire, about the same event, it's breathtaking...and plays almost like a heist movie. 

Jeff of Earth-J said:

My favorite comic book movie is Comic Book Villains.

Another movie I need to see.

When my wife and I watched Comic Book Villains, I was answering all the comic book trivia questions before the characters did, virtually word for word anticipating the script. (I imagine most reading this would as well.) At some point my wife turned to me and said, "You're starting to scare me."

My memory is that both movie and TV westerns remained popular through the sixties, and that both waned in the seventies. Movie reviewer Pauiline Kael was quoted as asserting that the "maverick cop" subgenre of Dirty Harry more or less replaced the western as the new popular paradigm-- but then, how many maverick cop films do you see today?

I love the Marvel movies, but I can see how not everyone might. I just think they are comic books put on the big screen.

But Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse is comics put on the screen literally.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service