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Carrie Fisher urges Daisy Ridley: "You should fight for your outfit. Don't be a slave like I was." When Ridley agrees, Fisher repeats, "You keep fighting against that slave outfit."

Of course being non-profit meant they went bankrupt and had to be bailed out by Sub-Mariner, but then it kept Spider-Man from joining. As much as he doesn't fit in with the Avengers he would fit in much worse in the FF. (Plus What If tells us Sue would marry Namor if he joined.)

I haven't had a chance to read that whole interview yet, but it sounds like a great conversation. 

Ron M. said:

Carrie Fisher urges Daisy Ridley: "You should fight for your outfit. Don't be a slave like I was." When Ridley agrees, Fisher repeats, "You keep fighting against that slave outfit."

Star Wars must not have caught on with older fans during the original trilogy. When I saw Debbie Reynolds perform at Knotts Berry Farm in the 80s she attempted to brag "You know, my daughter is Princess Leia!" I could hear the audience whisper "What? Who's that?" No applause. She looked confused and uncomfortable and went on with the show. I only saw the first movie once, watched the sequels on TV, and didn't get who she was talking about until I got home.

Sounds about right. Star Wars was a huge mainstream phenomenon when the <strike>only movies ever made under that title until this "Force Awakens" thing comes out</strike> original trilogy was being released (Carrie Fisher hosted SNL the autumn of '77) , but there was a whole audience who only knew there was this thing called "Star Wars" and it was some sort of SF, but they knew very little about it.

Ron M. said:

Star Wars must not have caught on with older fans during the original trilogy. When I saw Debbie Reynolds

Ron M. said:

Of course being non-profit meant they went bankrupt and had to be bailed out by Sub-Mariner, but then it kept Spider-Man from joining. As much as he doesn't fit in with the Avengers he would fit in much worse in the FF. (Plus What If tells us Sue would marry Namor if he joined.)

Despite what they told Spidey they must draw salaries. How else could Ben keep himself in cigars? Unless they don't pool the money they make from independent appearances.

I bet Sue has written a picture book, Petey the Pogo Plane. She probably licenses use of her likeness to the bestselling Where's Sue? series.

Sue was a model and actress but that idea was dropped very early on. I'd guess Johnny makes money fixing cars, and I'm pretty sure there was a Strange Tales story where he drove a racing car. I think it would have been interesting if Ben opened up a gym.

Ron M. said:

Star Wars must not have caught on with older fans during the original trilogy. When I saw Debbie Reynolds perform at Knotts Berry Farm in the 80s she attempted to brag "You know, my daughter is Princess Leia!" I could hear the audience whisper "What? Who's that?" No applause. She looked confused and uncomfortable and went on with the show. I only saw the first movie once, watched the sequels on TV, and didn't get who she was talking about until I got home.

When the first Star Wars movie debuted I was in my (very) late twenties. The people who went to see the movie were in their twenties or younger, except for the life-long science fiction and comics fans. The older crowd who attended the shows at Knott's had probably never heard of the movie. It was also the first really successful science fiction movie in, perhaps, forever. Like westerns today, the studios weren't making science fictions movies because the public just wasn't going to them. Star Wars paved the way for what has followed.

Luke Blanchard said:

Some of their adventures result from Reed's projects, but I think this isn't so common that one can call them explorers.

Reed's projects did generate adventures, but I think a large percentage resulted from their being sitting ducks in the Baxter Building. They were constantly fending off attacks because everybody knew where to find them.

2001 did pretty good. Most of the well known sf films are usually classified as horror, like The Thing From Another World. James Arness complained his costume made him look like a giant carrot. That's good, since that's what he was supposed to be. The Day the Earth Stood Still was also popular and started the 50s and 60s science fiction craze, although again most of them are considered horror (like The Beast From 20000 Fathoms.) For similar films like Star Wars you'd have to go back to Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers in the 30s.

That's how I see it too: Hollywood was making SF, but not adventure-oriented SF in the Buck Rogers/Flash Gordon/Tom Corbett tradition. I think in the 60s/70s big-budget films strove to seem adult. So the SF ones were downbeat, serious, message films, even when they were based around role reversal between humans and apes.


I’ve noticed this with horror, too. There was an age of Hammer-led British horror partly because in the period Hollywood didn’t make movies like that.


Hollywood does still make Westerns, but does it every make escapist Westerns, ones that make you wish you were living in the Old West? I suppose one could nominate Wild, Wild West, Jonah Hex, Cowboys and Aliens and The Lone Ranger, none of which I've seen. Perhaps they just didn't get the formula right.

Things to Come from 1936 was fascinating but it was also a message film that tried too hard to make its point. Pacifist scientists try to save the world. Sounds like the Kree forty years before the Mantis story. An even earlier film (Astro Boy was loosely based on it) would be Metropolis. Again the message keeps trying to take over the picture.

Universal came up with the Creature from the Black Lagoon movies in the 50s, but they weren't the same thing. Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein was a great movie, but once Bud and Lou met a monster, Universal never used that monster again. And while they've announced they're going to make new films of all of their classic monsters, they've said they'll be action adventure instead of horror. If I'm going to watch Dracula, I expect a horror story, not a superhero adventure.

The new Lone Ranger didn't do anything for me but make me wish Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels were still with us. And I still don't get why Tonto has a bird on his head.

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