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Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Second pic unrelated."

I thought I had seen all the episodes of the original Star Trek, but I missed the one where the crew had their names embroidered on their uniforms.

Also can't picture Spock eating Sugar Smacks.  Surely eating toxic crap is illogical.

Oddly, Sugar Smacks were highly valued on Vulcan for mitigating the effects of the Plak-Tow. Hundreds were killed by rampaging horny males in the Great Smacks Shortage of 2231, although the Vulcans now deny it ever happened.

What I can picture is one of Dr. Sevrin's followers saying, "Space energy comes from Sugar Smacks, brother."

The Baron said:

Also can't picture Spock eating Sugar Smacks.  Surely eating toxic crap is illogical.

The picture reminded me. In the original Star Trek series, the symbol on their uniforms was, I believe, specific to the Enterprise. Captains and crew on other starships had different symbols. I think it was the first or second movie that established the symbol as for the Federation, not just the Enterprise.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Second pic unrelated."

I thought I had seen all the episodes of the original Star Trek, but I missed the one where the crew had their names embroidered on their uniforms.

That's right. There were one or two episodes where you saw crew from other ships, and they had other symbols.

The first series in general, and the first season in particular, is filled with missed opportunities to go in some other, often better, direction. The first season often featured very different (if low-rent) aliens, and very few planets inhabited by Space Caucasians with one obvious social problem the Enterprise must solve (One of which, "Errand of Mercy," subverts the series trope). The United Earth Space Probe Agency is less hegemonic (the symbols, for example), the earlier episodes suggest they know of few other space-going civilizations, and the colonies are often a little rough. The first mention of a federation is by Balok, and he references an alien organization of which earth is unaware until that episode. By the season's end, the earth belongs to The Federation, later specifically identified as a very earth-centric sort of organization.

Also, the aliens were hardly ever on my lawn.

The Baron said:

That's right. There were one or two episodes where you saw crew from other ships, and they had other symbols.

I wonder if there was a Ben Cooper Spock costume with his name on it?

Also I see Spock as more of a Cheerios kind of guy!

Edited: Son of a Vulcan! This costume was from 1967 and, indeed, there's "Spock" on the collar!
 
The Baron said:



Jeff of Earth-J said:

"Second pic unrelated."

I thought I had seen all the episodes of the original Star Trek, but I missed the one where the crew had their names embroidered on their uniforms.

Also can't picture Spock eating Sugar Smacks.  Surely eating toxic crap is illogical.

The picture reminded me. In the original Star Trek series, the symbol on their uniforms was, I believe, specific to the Enterprise. Captains and crew on other starships had different symbols.

That's right. There were one or two episodes where you saw crew from other ships, and they had other symbols.

True, indeed, as seen from these screen caps:

 

       Commodore Matthew Decker, USS Constellation  ("The Doomsday Machine")

                        Captain Ronald Tracey, USS Exeter  ("The Omega Glory")

             Commodore Robert Wesley, USS Lexington  ("The Ultimate Computer")

Captain Comics said:

I love seeing entertainment tropes like the disembodied head traced as far back as possible. As the expression goes, there's nothing new under the sun, and they were probably telling stories about disembodied heads even in antiquity. Like, I dunno, Perseus and Medusa.


I hadn't made the connection, but in Norse myth Odin kept the head of Mirmir alive.

Always wondered why the aliens in The Cage didn't put that woman back together right because they had no idea what a human looked like, despite looking pretty human themselves. Makes more sense when you know they're supposed to be giant crab creatures, only they didn't have the budget to make them. Interesting looking back and seeing what has become an important franchise was originally a low budget show that got cancelled after only three years of their hoped for "five year mission."

Orpheus's head sings on after his death, but that might be a metaphor.

Luke Blanchard said:

Captain Comics said:

I hadn't made the connection, but in Norse myth Odin kept the head of Mirmir alive.

In Elizabethan times [SPOILER for Macbeth], when Macbeth was beheaded, there would have been a sheep’s bladder filled with sheep’s blood inserted into the fake head. When it was grasped by the hair and turned right side up, blood would have trickled through holes poked in the bladder and splattered the groundlings.

I have a theory about the aliens from The Cage. I think they were telepathic in that they could project their own thoughts and read others’ minds, but I think their “power of illusion” was largely faked. Near the end they worry that humans would learn their power of illusion. If it were genetic, as implied in the story, how does one “learn” that? No, I think the cells represent holodeck technology, an example of the machines left by their ancestors that they could use, but not maintain or repair.

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