Views: 49145

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion



Don Mankowski said:

Rorgg! Lee and Kirby had to give every monster a name, no matter how goofy.


...and, as Stan Lee would be sure to point out, "Remember... the second G is silent!"

Well that's no fun!

Jeff of Earth-J said:



Don Mankowski said:

Rorgg! Lee and Kirby had to give every monster a name, no matter how goofy.


...and, as Stan Lee would be sure to point out, "Remember... the second G is silent!"

So, just why is there a second, silent "G"?  Because Rorgg always signs his name thus?



Jeff of Earth-J said:



Don Mankowski said:

Rorgg! Lee and Kirby had to give every monster a name, no matter how goofy.


...and, as Stan Lee would be sure to point out, "Remember... the second G is silent!"

Why does this guy have two Ms?

Fredrick Frankenstein: "You make a yummy sound?"

He's just looking for a dance partner.

rumba, variants rhumba, so why not, rommbu?



Ronald Morgan said:

Don Mankowski said:

So, just why is there a second, silent "G"?  Because Rorgg always signs his name thus?

Back in the old country, the second "G" was pronounced as a hard "G," but the first was pronounced with a soft "G" sound. When his grandfather came through Ellis Island, the clerk couldn't handle the pronunciation, so the old man changed it right then and there.

Orange rock man...orange rock man...orange rock man...I don't think Stan was the slightest bit surprised when he just said make Ben Grimm "shapeless" and Jack came up with the Thing.

I found this article interesting. It's on rediscovered German fairytales from the time of the Brothers Grimm, collected by Franz Xaver von Shönwerth.

Interesting. It says Amazon only has a severely edited version. Wonder if any of the stories appeared in any of Andrew Lang's twelve books on fairy tales.

Also noticed the article on where clown sightings started. It's become unsafe for anyone to dress like a clown. People love pirates, who set homes on fire and raped and murdered, but want to assault anyone that tries to make them laugh.

For October, more titles created by combining different TV online guide capsule descriptions:

A mad doctor grafts the hands of a murderer on to his manicurist girlfriend at a lion farm in California

In a nineteenth-century scandal, two song and dance men run into a peanut vendor on a horse ranch.

A millionaire, his niece, and a pilot love a mutual love, a bird girl of nature

A jealous woman kills people to obtain cadavers and a killer brain

Victorian poet Robert Browning courts a broken-necked shepherd named Ygor

The Bronte sisters and their brother fight a ring of bloodthirsty scavengers

Scenes trace the history of witchcraft told by a psychic

With his sidekicks, Snipe and Doc, a saloon singer on the British coast stumbles onto a gangster and falls for her father’s dead wife as a playmate

The Bowery Boys open a detective agency when one of them in disguise takes up with a taxi driver.

I like the song and dance men (Hope and Crosby?) running into the peanut vendor (Edgar Kennedy?) At one point two horses get into a crazy conversation and one ends up doing a slow burn. The ranch of course is owned by Dorothy.

The psychic telling the story of witchcraft is the sort of show that could (and probably has) happened.

I'm wondering if some of the more bizarre pilots that got made were based on the producer or director thumbing through the TV Guide and doing that. It would explain some of the weird stuff that turned up once then vanished in the 70s.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service