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I agree with many of his points (and the Baron's extrapolation). I buy few comics these days and they tend to be graphic novels or "all-in-one" issues (even many TPBs still end with the sense that we've finished a story, but other plots have already started. Reboot in ten...) As he notes in the video, what series would you tell people to read first if they wanted to start reading Superman?

Initiate rant mode:

"DC's getting hit hard by that SJW movement. But they'll survive."

--Guy hanging around at a local comic shop, in response to the firing of Eddie Berganza.

(Yes, I actually overheard this and tapped it into my cell for my writer's notebook. Take the username from the guy who posted this video and subtract the first "e" and possibly you have the speaker's username)

As for the "politics": old-school comics have always cruised the surface of politics and "social relevance." Maybe some do it more often now, but I suspect it's just a specific political slant that irks and/or enrages some readers, completely out of proportion to the actual political content. A lot of the online complaints about the "politics" in comics involves the decrying of supposed "Social Justice Warriors" and a reaction to any hint of diversity. Those related controversies can be found throughout pop culture, and not just comic books.

For a comic/mainstream overlap example, see the online savaging of the Captain Marvel movie before anyone ever saw the film. As I've written elsewhere, its feminist politics were about as radical as a 1970s After-School Special.

Manga has diversity in that the range of Manga available appeals to a broad range of readers. We've gone through more comic shops locally than a city this size would be expected to have. Currently the survivors include the really big one, the medium-sized one that's also very much a gaming shop, the quirky, long-standing smaller one (with a lot of second-hand collectibles), and the Manga/Anime one. When I talk with young fans, it's that last store I hear more about. Those who follow the traditional superheroes overwhelmingly connect with the movies and TV shows.

As someone - Andrew, maybe - said the other day, interest in the movies does not seem to translate into interest in the comics..

The Baron said:

As someone - Andrew, maybe - said the other day, interest in the movies does not seem to translate into interest in the comics..

Some people wonder how Starbucks does so well when they seem to have too many locations. The answer apparently is that a person driving or walking by will make an impulse purchase, then get into the habit.

When comic books were on street newsstands alongside newspapers and other magazines, passers-by could be attracted to a cover, especially if they had heard of the character before. Unlike many of you, my parents didn’t purchase comics and bring them home to me. I would be in a drug store (when they used to have lunch counters and spinner racks) and be attracted to covers. Once I got started I went back for more.  I started about eight years old, when they were still ten cents each. Can't do that with comics anymore. You have to seek out or be dragged to a comic store and be willing to shell out $4-5 for a single issue.

Compounding that problem is the non-returnable status of all or most of the comics. My LCS owner once confided in me that he stocked all of the Will Eisner GNs and couldn’t sell any. How much unsellable product can comic shops afford to buy if it can’t be returned? As a consequence, the books that move are ordered, and the customers that like those books are increasingly the only ones that come to the store. As my LCS owner told a reluctant landlord when he was having to relocate, “most of my customers have gray hair.”

I still think that the survival of comics depends on going (exclusively) online with individual issues (at a lower price) followed by softbound and hardbound collections.

How many towns have easily accessible comic book stores?  I'm lucky, there's one in my town that's maybe a ten or  fifteen minute walk away, which is good, because bugger-all parking they have.

To my mind, this is a big issue.  Comics were thirty cents each when I started reading them. Grandpa would slip me a five-spot, and if I wanted to drop it all on comics, I could get as many as sixteen books.

Nowadays, that five-spot would buy one comic, and to get sixteen books would put you down $64 - $80, and I very much doubt that anyone's Grandpa is slipping them that much cash, and if they are, their moms are probably snagging it and making them save it.

Richard Willis said:

Can't do that with comics anymore. You have to seek out or be dragged to a comic store and be willing to shell out $4-5 for a single issue.

According to Google Maps, there's a store that sells comic books that's an 8 minute drive away, but I'll have to see it. I thought this store was a women's clothing shop.

"I'll have Captain America, Action Comics, X-Men and that yellow sun dress, please."

PowerBook Pete, the Mad Mod said:

According to Google Maps, there's a store that sells comic books that's an 8 minute drive away, but I'll have to see it. I thought this store was a women's clothing shop.

I'll go by there tomorrow to check it out.

If there is a phone number, call it first. The map programs have a way of adding businesses and never deleting them. They sometimes have multiple stores/restaurants shown in the same small building.

PowerBook Pete, the Mad Mod said:

I'll go by there tomorrow to check it out.

Comic Shop Locator is more reliable.

https://www.comicshoplocator.com/

I believe Weekly Shonen Jump is still cover priced at 300 yen, or around 3 bucks. That's for 500 pages of comics. Additionally, you can buy comics at pretty much every convenience store and bookstore in Japan. 

I think I also read that Weekly Shonen Jump's circulation recently dropped, from 1.6 million to 1.5. That's not including digital subscriptions. 

The Baron said:

To my mind, this is a big issue.  Comics were thirty cents each when I started reading them. Grandpa would slip me a five-spot, and if I wanted to drop it all on comics, I could get as many as sixteen books.

Nowadays, that five-spot would buy one comic, and to get sixteen books would put you down $64 - $80, and I very much doubt that anyone's Grandpa is slipping them that much cash, and if they are, their moms are probably snagging it and making them save it.

Richard Willis said:

Can't do that with comics anymore. You have to seek out or be dragged to a comic store and be willing to shell out $4-5 for a single issue.

I essentially abandoned comics as a teen and then stumbled over the stores and "culture" in my twenties, when Crisis and a chance finding of The Avengers issue with David Letterman renewed my interest. As a kid, I bought comics in grocery stores and convenience stores and the like. And my renewed interest? Crisis made mainstream headlines. That issue of The Avengers was on the stands in a bus station. It was only after stumbling across comics that I found my way to one of those "comic shops" I'd been hearing about.

Casual readers don't much exist, despite the massive crowds that (pre-COVID) turned out for Free Comic Book Day. Quite a few of those people are fans of the films and TV shows, which, as several people have said, is a fandom that doesn't correlate directly with comic-reading fandom.  Three of my nieces never miss the Marvel movies. Two of those have no interest in the comics, and the third one, when she reads comics, mainly reads.... Manga. None of this should be surprising, of course. James Bond, the protean character from the movies, has a far greater fandom than James Bond, the guy in the problematic Cold War era novels.

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