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The dis on Pierce Brosnan is unfounded. The producers wanted him to take over the role of Bond following Roger Moore but the TV show Remington Steele wouldn't release him from his contract after deciding to continue the show (which was swiftly cancelled). The not-so-handsome, not so-charming Timothy Dalton was cast instead. Although his appearance and portrayal were closer to the character than Roger Moore's, the public didn't like him as much. When Brosnan finally took over the role he was much more popular.

Luke Blanchard said:

Forever and a Death: Donald Westlake's treatment for an unmade James Bond film, and its final form as a non-Bond novel.

I'd love to read it if it is published. Always enjoyed Steinbeck.

Luke Blanchard said:

According to the article, the characters fear a supernatural force is committing the murders. It's my guess it turn out they're just superstitious.

 

I think the Teleport City article understates how well-known Pierce Brosnan was before he was cast as Bond. He'd been a leading man in movies as well as on TV.

I don't buy the dis on the director. I often can't tell from a director's filmography how he got a big movie, but I'm sure they're chosen carefully. Sometimes they've done relevant second unit work.

Luke Blanchard said:

Forever and a Death: Donald Westlake's treatment for an unmade James Bond film, and its final form as a non-Bond novel.

Richard Willis said:

The dis on Pierce Brosnan is unfounded. The producers wanted him to take over the role of Bond following Roger Moore but the TV show Remington Steele wouldn't release him from his contract after deciding to continue the show (which was swiftly cancelled). The not-so-handsome, not so-charming Timothy Dalton was cast instead. Although his appearance and portrayal were closer to the character than Roger Moore's, the public didn't like him as much. When Brosnan finally took over the role he was much more popular.

Hey, the dis on Timothy Dalton is just as unfounded!

I didn't have a problem with Timothy Dalton. He was a more believable secret agent than Roger Moore.

He is doing good work on Doom Patrol. 

Atomas

More on Pellos here.

Interesting.  Maciste was the protagonist in Colossus and the Headhunters, which was featured in show 605 of Mystery Science Theater 3000I had no idea that the character had such a long history.

Luke Blanchard said:

The man who played him in the original series was Bartolomeo Pagano. He was a stevedore before Cabiria. Wikipedia says it was released in Apr. 1914, which is before the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand.

I'm sure I've seen The Birth of the Nation described as the first feature film, but Cabiria is comparably long, over two hours, and came out the preceding year.

The scenario for Cabiria was attributed to the poet Gabriele D'Annunzio, who was a proto-fascist. After the war he seized power in the city of Fiume for a short period. But the net tells me he only supplied the names and intertitles after the film was shot. Wikipedia says it was partly based on Flaubert's Salaambo and a novel by Emilio Salgari, a famous author in Italy.

I watched Maciste in Hell (1925) many years ago. Maciste is sent to Hell, seduced by a demoness - she doesn't find it difficult - and turned into a demon! Later he quells a demon revolt, so the Devil lets him go, but a lady demon takes revenge on him by chaining him to a rock like Prometheus. A little boy's prayer sets him free. (My hat-tip to Italian Wikipedia for jogging my memory.)

It was apparently an American print. At several points the original intertitles must've quoted Dante. The print attributed the quotes to Longfellow, who published a translation of the Divine Comedy.

I've seen it argued Mussolini based his public persona on the way Pagano played Maciste. From the way I remember Pagano posturing early in the film, I think it's true.


From Herbie #8.

Time was, I couldn't get through a day without Donald Trump showing up in my newsfeed. And it was irritating.

Now it's Zack Snyder. Still irritating.

Luke Blanchard said:

I'm sure I've seen The Birth of the Nation described as the first feature film, but Cabiria is comparably long, over two hours, and came out the preceding year.

I've seen it argued Mussolini based his public persona on the way Pagano played Maciste. From the way I remember Pagano posturing early in the film, I think it's true.

So the first two feature films both inspired fascists.

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