'Point's blog about the Black Widow got me to thinking about how since our heroes don't age normally, they often outlive elements of their origins, i.e., as the USSR recedes into the past, Natasha's past as a Soviet spy will doubtless recede with it. A small adjustment perhaps, making simply a Russian spy is easy enough.

Iron Man's ties to the Vietnam War are a little trickier - of course, it can be tied to whatever the latest war is, although the characters may have to be recreated somewhat. Heck, it doesn't have to be tied to a war at all, really. If need be, the people that capture Tony could be a terrorist group or a drug cartel.

Sometimes, just little stuff has to be tweaked - the mention of Ed Sullivan in Spidey's origin, for example.

Other times it's a character's profession - what happens to Superman's origin if newspapers go extinct? Bet Siegel & Shuster didn't see that one coming.

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Rich Lane said:
In Daredevil, they've kinda minimized the radioactive isotope that clocked Matt across the eyes and played up the retconned ninja training he received as a way of explaining his heightened senses.

Heh. Sounds like something out of the Zatoichi pictures.
Initially, Reed Richards was simply trying to beat the Russians into space. After we'd actually been there for some time, it became an attempt to test an FTL drive.
Rich Lane said:
Initially, Reed Richards was simply trying to beat the Russians into space. After we'd actually been there for some time, it became an attempt to test an FTL drive.

I don't know if they've already done this, but a Marvel "Earth-2" where the Silver Age versions of Marvel characters were as old as they ought to be would be interesting.
The Baron said:

I don't know if they've already done this, but a Marvel "Earth-2" where the Silver Age versions of Marvel characters were as old as they ought to be would be interesting.

That's exactly the premise of M-2, where the Spider-Girl stories are set.
Bwah Ha Ha
DPTTN

The Baron said:
Mark S. Ogilvie said:
Without the trauma or the gimick that got a supervillain started where are they?

Mark

Billerica?
The Baron said:
Captain Comics said:
Real investigative reporters are not celebrities and do not get into shoot-outs --

They don't? But what about that time you and that one-armed guy shot up that mall down in - I mean, nothing, nothing!


Rich Lane said:
Captain Comics said:
In other words, most newspaper work is deadly dull.

I really doubt there are many jobs that are popular in fiction that are anywhere near what they are in reality. I've had dozens of kids over the last few years tell me they want to go into forensics because of CSI, but we've had real experts in the field come here for career days and say it's nothing like that.

My theory about movies and TV shows -- more so for TV shows, less so for movies -- is that everybody, no matter what line of work he or she is in, has at least one story about an extraordinary day on the job. Everybody has at least one story about the time things went haywire or something occurred that was amusing or unusual or exciting or offbeat or just different -- and TV takes those stories and presents them as a typical day.

Take ER, for example. The stuff that happens there -- harrowing surgeries, pregnant mothers bleeding to death, multi-vehicle collisions, bomb threats, tank attacks, crashing helicopters, etc. -- it's all happened somewhere, once. But not day in and day out at the same location.

Or Law & Order: They tell you right off the bat their stories are "ripped from the headlines" -- not from page 26 of the Metro section.

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