Deck Log Entry # 233 The Silver-Age Challenge---DC Edition IIII

"Life," said comic-strip writer Allen Saunders, "is what happens to us while we are making other plans."  (Yes, I know that line has been attributed to others, most often, John Lennon, but the January, 1957 issue of Reader's Digest credits it to Saunders.)  In my case, I had Deck Log entries planned for May and June, but life happened to me.  No, don't worry, folks, nothing ominous.  Just a couple of normal upheavals of daily existence that got tossed at me at the same time.  Things have pretty much settled out, now.  But, it's the summer, and that means it's time for my annual trivia challenge.  Fortunately, I already had the quiz put together several months ago, so that was one "other plan" that life didn't derail.

 

 

An apt sub-title for this year's quiz might be "Leftovers".  Most of the questions you'll see below are ones I've held back for various reasons---they needed further research, they didn't fit the quiz theme for that particular year, they were difficult to word properly, or sometimes, I just plain forgot about them.  That last reason is particularly nagging, because I know there are still a couple of good questions that I've forgotten about and can't recall where I put the piece of paper on which I wrote them.  No matter, they'll be grist for a future quiz---if I ever remember them.

 

As always, I expect this will be someone's first encounter with one of my Silver-Age challenges.  For example, if you've stumbled across this while searching for something else, feel free to try your hand.  Better yet, check out the main board, Captain Comics Presents the Comics Round Table.  Odds are that you'll find something that interests you, even if you're not a comics fan, and it's a swell group of posters.

 

So, for those folks, it's time to cut and paste the rules:

1.  All of the questions, and answers, are drawn from Silver-Age material.  That is, anything produced by DC from the publication of Showcase # 4 (Sep.-Oct., 1956) to December, 1968, which I demark as the end of the Silver Age.  If your answer comes from outside that period, then it is invalid.  For example, if I were to ask “What is the space sector patrolled by Tomar Re, the Green Lantern of Xudar?” and you answered “Space sector 2813,” you would be wrong.  During the Silver Age, Tomar Re’s space sector was “9”; “2813” was a Bronze Age revision.

                      

The Silver-Age limitation is a tricky thing to keep in mind.  Even the veteran quiz-takers here slip up sometimes.  (Remember the “Per the Legion Constitution, who is the only person that the Legion Leader is answerable to?” fiasco?)

2.  I’m definitely not infallible, also something to which the long-time players will attest. I might have missed something, somewhere, in twelve years of DC publication.  If you come up with an answer that meets the criteria of the question and can cite the Silver-Age reference, then I will gladly award you credit.  “But I always thought . . . “ explanations won’t cut it, though.

3.  I’ve got no problem with anybody using a search engine to look for answers. I try to make my questions as Google-proof as possible.  The right answers are difficult to find with a search engine, though I cannot say impossible.  At least once, I tripped myself up when an article I had written for another site contained the answer to a question from that year’s quiz, and one of the players found it.

4.  There are no prizes. You’re playing for bragging rights.

 

And, as usual, so everybody can feel good about getting at least one right, I start off with a lob.  This time it's . . .

 

 

1.  Name the alternate-universe world which has no indigenous super-heroes, and here, committing evil acts is appropriate societal behaviour.

 

2.  Who is the majority stockholder of the Daily Planet?

 

3.  In the thirtieth century, the Planetary Federation stores forbidden weapons at what location?

 

4.  What team operated, for a time, out of an underwater headquarters left to it by Scientist X?

5.  The creation of rutherfordium caused what Silver-Age villain to change his name when he returned post-Crisis?

 

6.  In the Golden Age, he was "the Batman".  That definite article, "the", gradually lapsed into disuse and the Masked Manhunter became plain, old "Batman".  However, contrary to popular belief, even in the Silver Age, there were times when he was still called the Batman.  I know of at least four Silver-Age stories in which a character referred to him as "the Batman".  I'll settle for you naming three of them.  (For clarity, I'm not talking about sobriquets like "the Batman of Zur-En-Arrh" or "the Batman of 2967", and they don't count.  I mean instances when someone referred to our Caped Crusader as "the Batman".)

 

7.  In one Gunner and Sarge story from Our Fighting Forces, the two Marines are joined by a new recruit named Billy.  Like many of DC's wartime supporting characters, Billy was given a nickname and went on to make regular appearances.  By what nickname was Billy better known to DC's World War II fans?

8.  Outside of, naturally, Detective John (the Martian Manhunter) Jones, who is the strongest officer on the Middletown Police Department?

 

9.  In military parlance, a "mustang" officer is one who enters the service as an enlisted man and later becomes a commissioned officer (as opposed to being directly commissioned into an armed force, as most officers are).  Name two of DC's war magazine headliners who were mustang officers.

 

10.  In the Silver Age, the Justice League of America responded to requests for help sent to them through the mail.  People who wanted to contact the JLA this way sent their letters to what location?

I’ll provide the answers next month.  In the meantime, I look forward to your answers and the commentary that always results from them.  I think, this time, especially in the case of question number six. 

 

Good luck, and more important, have fun!

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Initial responses:

1. Qward (nicely phrased to suggest Earth Three)

4. Challengers of the Unknown
5. Mr. 103
7. Pooch
8. I'm going to guess Mike Hanson who was "The Super-Sleuth's Bodyguard" in Detective 272.

At least a couple more later.

On #9 I'm guessing Phil Hunter and JEB Stuart (I know he started enlisted and got promoted, but I don't know if it's within your Silver Age parameters).

On 2, Superman 181 established Mark Vine is the big stockholder.


Fraser Sherman said:

Initial responses:

1. Qward (nicely phrased to suggest Earth Three)

4. Challengers of the Unknown
5. Mr. 103
7. Pooch
8. I'm going to guess Mike Hanson who was "The Super-Sleuth's Bodyguard" in Detective 272.

At least a couple more later.

To combine for simpler reading:

1. Qward (nicely phrased to suggest Earth Three)4. Challengers of the Unknown

2. Mark Vine according to Superman 181
5. Mr. 103
7. Pooch
8. I'm going to guess Mike Hanson who was "The Super-Sleuth's Bodyguard" in Detective 272.

#9: This is getting to the WAG point as I don't know the war comics but I'm guessing Phil Hunter and JEB Stuart (I know the latter got promoted but I don't know if it's before your cut-off dae).

#10 — according to "Super-Struggle Against Shaggy Man" it's a special address in Washington DC

I'm curious about whether there's some easy way to answer to #6 ("Of course! Logically it would have to be Batman #180!") or it simply takes the grunt work of flipping through the issues (I recall doing both on questions in past quizzes).

I think that's the key — Earth-Three had no superheroes but the moral code was the same as Earth-One.

Philip Portelli said:

Question 1: My answer is Qward as Earth-Three had good people.

The Commander clarified the CIA question some years back: Nick, according to the first SHIELD story, is a G-2 Colonel, but the CIA often borrowed them. IIRC anyway.
Richard Willis said:

Number 9: Nick Fury popped into my head, but he's not DC .It was in the Silver Age. He was referred to as a "Colonel in the CIA" in Fantastic Four #21 (even though there is no such thing). Colonel may have been a thing in the OSS, which I believe was military, but civilian workers in the U.S. government have GS (Government Service) rankings, not military ranks. Fury was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, a battlefield commission) during the Korean War in  Sgt. Fury Annual #1 (1965). In Sgt. Fury Annual #3(AUG67) they were all (alive and well, in case there was suspense in those WWII stories) in Vietnam and now he was a colonel in SHIELD, complete with eyepatch. Aren't you glad you asked? 

 (Love the quiz, but this time I know none of the answers.

Well, bother — I thought JLA #37 with a flashback to Bats' first appearance might reference him as The Batman, but nope.

Fraser Sherman said:

I'm curious about whether there's some easy way to answer to #6 ("Of course! Logically it would have to be Batman #180!") or it simply takes the grunt work of flipping through the issues . . .

Logic and grunt work---it takes some of both to answer this one.

On #3, I'm guessing "Planetary Federation" rather than United Planets is the key. From which I deduce (right or wrong) that it's the Superman of the 30th century setting rather than LSH; one synopsis for Action 338 indicates Muto raids a cache of superweapons on Weaponsworld so that's what I'm going with.

Dang. I could ignore it if it were just grunt work but the logic angle will gnaw at me until I either figure it out or you post the answers.

Commander Benson said:

Fraser Sherman said:

I'm curious about whether there's some easy way to answer to #6 ("Of course! Logically it would have to be Batman #180!") or it simply takes the grunt work of flipping through the issues . . .

Logic and grunt work---it takes some of both to answer this one.

Keep meaning to say (and now I have) that I'm glad whatever storms life tossed at you have passed, Commander.

I know disappointingly few of these.  (Well, I'm disappointed at my poor showing!).  I'll post my answers before reading anyone else's replies. Here are the ones I can answer.

1. Name the alternate-universe world which has no indigenous super-heroes, and here, committing evil acts is appropriate societal behaviour.

My first thought was that this refers to Earth 3, home to the Crime Syndicate of America, as seen in the second annual JLA/JSA team up in JLA #29 & #30 (Aug & Sep 1964).  However, I don't believe that we ever saw enough of Earth 3 in the Silver Age to know whether the description given applies. I think that the question actually refers to the anti-matter world of Qward, first seen in Green Lantern #2 (Sep-Oct 1960).

4. What team operated, for a time, out of an underwater headquarters left to it by Scientist X?

The Challengers of the Unknown.  They acquired this HQ in Challengers of the Unknown #53, (Dec 1966 - Jan 1967).  I've never read the story, but managed to find the answer with the aid of the GCD.

5. The creation of rutherfordium caused what Silver-Age villain to change his name when he returned post-Crisis?

The clue here is that Rutherfordium is element #104 in the periodic table.  The villain concerned is Mr 103, who first appeared in Doom Patrol #98 (Sep 1965).  When he reappeared post-Crisis in Superman #189 (Feb 2003), he was called Mr 104.

Strangely enough, I half-knew this answer (well enough to be able to look him up in the GCD and DC wiki), even though I've never read any story in which he appears.

6. I know of at least four Silver-Age stories in which a character referred to [Batman] as "the Batman". I'll settle for you naming three of them.

I can only manage one of the asked-for three, and this is from memory (I've not been able to look the story up to confirm that I'm remembering it correctly). In World's Finest Comics #145 (Nov 1964), after a powerless Superman is brutalised by a mind-controlled Batman, he thinks "I hate the Batman".

10. In the Silver Age, the Justice League of America responded to requests for help sent to them through the mail.  People who wanted to contact the JLA this way sent their letters to what location?

I seem to remember the JLA picking up mail from a Post Office box (if that is the correct term in the US) in Happy Harbor, Snapper Carr's home town.  I haven't been able to verify this.

I can't answer any of the other questions.  I'm particularly saddened about my failure to answer question 3 (the 30th-century cache of forbidden weapons), as it must come from a Legion story that I've forgotten.

By the way, Commander, many thanks for, as ever, an interesting and enjoyable quiz.

Fraser Sherman said:

On #3, I'm guessing "Planetary Federation" rather than United Planets is the key. From which I deduce (right or wrong) that it's the Superman of the 30th century setting rather than LSH; one synopsis for Action 338 indicates Muto raids a cache of superweapons on Weaponsworld so that's what I'm going with.

That's a very clever deduction, Fraser.  I assumed that "Planetary Federation" indicated an early Legion tale, from before their mythos had entirely settled down (in the same way that they sometimes interacted with the World-Wide Police rather than the Science Police).  However, a reference to a non-Legion future story would make a great deal of sense.

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