Unless I'm missing it (and, if I am, some moderator-type should feel free to move my comment there), the good folks at Captain Comic's have avoided the firestorm that has hit certain places because Michael B.Jordan has been cast as Johnny Storm in the forthcoming FF film. I'm fine with the choice-- the movies are their own entity-- but I'm annoyed that they've stated Sue and Johnny will not be siblings. I think that decision removes an essential part of the FF's squabbling family dynamic.

Anyone else?

 

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They apparently were considering it for awhile, but now it seems to be down to four guys. So another attempt at representation and diversity in popular entertainment has been trampled beneath the boot of conventional hive-mind thinking.

I would not have a problem with such a break in the rigid structure of stereotypes, but I'm broad-minded, if you know what I mean and I think you do.

-- MSA

Let's not also overlook that Man of Steel and Hancock both had a LOT of detractors-- though money talks in Hollywood-- and Hancock is a stand-alone character. Man of Steel is supposed to open up the DC movie-verse-- which has much greater potential to draw in large and diverse crowds.

Personally, I wish they'd forget both, and continue expanding the DCU for mass media out of Arrow.

Sad note: Battlestar Galactica had surprisingly few non-Caucasian extras (separate of the regular cast), but found quite a few the first time they went on board the prison ship. The point was raised at a WorldCon, where someone said, look, unless you specific race in Hollywood, central casting tends to send White. So there's active racism and racism that results from willful blindness to racism.

The original or the update? I recall the original prison barge story had mostly white people.

JD DeLuzio said:

Let's not also overlook that Man of Steel and Hancock both had a LOT of detractors-- though money talks in Hollywood-- and Hancock is a stand-alone character. Man of Steel is supposed to open up the DC movie-verse-- which has much greater potential to draw in large and diverse crowds.

 

Personally, I wish they'd forget both, and continue expanding the DCU for mass media out of Arrow.

 

Sad note: Battlestar Galactica had surprisingly few non-Caucasian extras (separate of the regular cast), but found quite a few the first time they went on board the prison ship. The point was raised at a WorldCon, where someone said, look, unless you specific race in Hollywood, central casting tends to send White. So there's active racism and racism that results from willful blindness to racism.



Mr. Silver Age said:


I wouldn't say Stan and Jack were being racist in 1964 when they changed the Black Panther's mask, they were being risk-averse. Rather than criticize the risk-averse, I applaud those who don't let the conventional wisdom get in their way. MSA


I think I'm leaning this way too. Although it might help if we were all in agreement on exactly what the word "racism" means. If we are talking about a strict interpretation of belief in racial superiority that's one thing. Of course there is also the phenomenon of institutionalized racism or the actual practice of discrimination or even just the more benign "racial insensitivity."

On the whole, I can't say I expect people to be crusaders in the name of diversity but I would like to think that they are at least trying to educate themselves and become more aware.

Some people are just going to be resistant to change. I myself raised an objection when DC made Morgan Edge a black man in the New 52. I still don’t know why I did that.



Jeff of Earth-J said:

Some people are just going to be resistant to change. I myself raised an objection when DC made Morgan Edge a black man in the New 52. I still don’t know why I did that.


Heh, happens to me all the time. I guess we all have a lot of subconscious conditioning that we aren't really aware of.
I remember as a kid, coming across the character Black Goliath, and just sort of accepting him as being just another super-hero. Now looking back, I can't believe something like that ever happened. There are so many offensive aspects to that character I don't even know where to start.

Being the whitest of white boys (It's true - I can't jump!), I often wonder how black comics fans feel about being presented with these "hand-me-down" characters - Giant-Man, Mister Terrific and so on.

Watched Rise of the Silver Surfer last night. It wasn't that bad. The "power-switching" stuff was a bit goofy, and I didn't mind the absence of the Watcher.  In some ways, I think they might have been better off doing what they did, and hinting at Galactus, rather than showing him.

The version of the show NOT typically predicated online with "cheesy 70s-era."

Mark S. Ogilvie said:

The original or the update? I recall the original prison barge story had mostly white people.



Mark S. Ogilvie said:

It was at the time and no one writing comics understood the kind of complexities involved in building something like the Saturn 5, the new fabrication techniques needed for the engine bell alone took a while to come up with. But at the time the FF was Stan's idea of a lot of counter to the general wisdom, the young kid who was not a sidekick, the woman who knew the secret identity and so on. Stan took a risk and taking a risk is something Hollywood doesn't do easily.

 

I'm going to slightly disagree.  I think the concept of the team - brainy leader, brawny buddy, young hothead, and "the girl" - was well established in 1961. with groups like the Sea Devils and the Challengers of the Unknown already out there.  In fact, Jack Kirby had worked on Challengers just prior to coming to Marvel.  What was new and original was the squabbling within the team, and the public fearing them, most especially the Thing.  Those things, and the characterization and the dialogue, just didn't happen at DC..  The FF also put on costumes but didn't hide their identities from the public, and had a headquarters in the middle of New York - compare that to the Fortress of Solitude, the Batcave, the JLA's cave in Happy Harbour, etc - also, I think, unique for the time.

Yes, Stan and Jack took risks, and had plenty of originality in everything they did, but hey were also smart enough to take existing tropes and put their own spin on it.

The Baron said:

Watched Rise of the Silver Surfer last night. It wasn't that bad. The "power-switching" stuff was a bit goofy, and I didn't mind the absence of the Watcher.  In some ways, I think they might have been better off doing what they did, and hinting at Galactus, rather than showing him.

It's my understanding that they hinted at Galactus rather than showing him because they way Galactus looks is cool on the comics page but pretty silly on the movie screen, and they couldn't come up with a better look. 

But it fits with the notion that Galactus is a being our minds cannot comphend. 

JD DeLuzio said:

Sad note: Battlestar Galactica had surprisingly few non-Caucasian extras (separate of the regular cast), but found quite a few the first time they went on board the prison ship. The point was raised at a WorldCon, where someone said, look, unless you specific race in Hollywood, central casting tends to send White. So there's active racism and racism that results from willful blindness to racism.

Right. Here are 10 examples: "What If People Reacted to These 10 Roles Like They Have to Michael...

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