I've been thinking for a while of doing some reviews of pre-Silver Age features, covering their whole runs or periods within their runs. "Pre-Silver Age Reviews" reviews would be a clumsy title for a thread, so I've titled it "Golden Age Reviews" instead, although I'll be including features from the 50s.

 

I've done a couple of reviews along these lines previously in the "What Comic Books Have You Read Today?" thread, so I'll start by reposting those.

15/05/15 I've changed the title to "Golden Age and Transition Era Feature Reviews", as I've started another thread, here, for issue reviews.

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Luke Blanchard said:

Ka-Zar was Goodman's Tarzan, so he might've told Lee to bring him back.

Since they never really had a hit with Ka-Zar, I suspect they brought him in from the pulp days so they could maintain his trademark.

I understand that Goodman's favorite character was the original Human Torch, which probably led to Johnny Storm's feature getting a longer life than it probably warranted.

Didn't current Ka-Zar mention briefly in his origin about picking up the name from somewhere as he grew up in the jungle? Didn't get what that meant at the time since I didn't know he wasn't the original, but in the 60s he would probably have seen Marvel Mystery as a kid.

Yet he didn't mind the current Torch wasn't the same character. Or did he, possibly insisting after that that Namor and Cap be the originals?

Carl Burgos was still at Marvel at the time yet I don't think he ever drew Johnny. From what I've read it's no wonder he ended up angry and bitter making those gory comics. Chick Stone also wound up there, although both of them quickly got booted from the covers.

 

 

 

Perhaps it didn't work on mutants, thus Hank and Bobby realized he was just reading things like laundry lists.

Richard Willis said:

Since they never really had a hit with Ka-Zar, I suspect they brought him in from the pulp days so

It might be reusing the name was thought protection against getting sued for imitating Tarzan (or Korak - the Silver Age Ka-Zar was arguably a teen originally).

Burgos did pencil one of Johnny's stories: the first Beetle story, in Strange Tales #123.

I missed the obvious. Ant-Man appeared in Tales to Astonish because that was where "The Man in the Ant Hill!" appeared.

This post displaced the thread Solicitations: Marvel Comics for July 2015 from the home page.

"Henri Duval"

New Fun #6, More Fun #7-#8, More Fun Comics #9-#10

This was one of the first two series by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. It debuted in New Fun #6, along with "Dr Occult", but unlike the latter it only lasted five instalments. The first four were one page long, and the last two pages. I haven't read the second instalment.

The earlier instalments were bylined "by Jerome Siegel and Joe Shuster", and the last "by Hugh Langley". ("Dr Occult" was bylined "by Leger and Reuths".) The last instalment is less carefully-drawn than the preceding ones - the backgrounds are much sparer - but the GCD takes it to also be by Siegel and Shuster and the art looks like Shuster's work. I first thought the instalment's sparer appearance was likely due to Shuster's workload - "Dr Occult" went to two pages the same issue - but duo were also doing "Federal Men" in New Comics and it went down to two pages from its initial four around the same time, so perhaps not.

The strip was a serial about a soldier of fortune in 17th century France. (The date is not specified, but that's what the costumes indicate.) In part one a carriage's way is blocked by a duel between Duval and a man who insulted his clothing. A young woman from the carriage party pleads with Duval to spare his defeated foe. His rides after the carriage to find out her name, and saves it from an attack by brigands. The woman reveals that he has saved the king, travelling incognito, from an attack arranged by his enemies.

When part three opens it is night, and Duval and co. are upstairs at an inn. Duval has apparently been protecting the king from an attacker. A party of soldiers arrive and force their way in downstairs. Duval thinks they're the king's men but the king tells him they're "enemies in disguise". Duval slips onto the roof and sees the inn is surrounded.

In part four the king and his companions are taken prisoner. Duval knocks out the soldiers' leader and takes his outer garments to impersonate him. He directs the men to search the inn while he guards the prisoners, and then absconds with them by horseback. But the soldiers quickly catch on and pursue them.

In part five Duval and co. hide as the soldiers ride past. A straggler arrives and Duval duels him. As they fight the other soldiers return, and Duval's companions "treacherously desert him". He is overwhelmed by the soldiers and taken prisoner. They take him to a jail in a nearby town and report to their commander. He questions their having only one prisoner and is told the others got away. Duval says he doesn't understand.

And there the series ended. The next issue saw the start of a new series by the creators, "Calling All Cars" (later "Radio Squad"), and the beginning of an adaptation of The Three Musketeers by others. Presumably the feature was killed to make way for these.

The last instalment could be setting up a twist that the 'king' is really a fugitive, but that would make his pretty companion a deceiver, and that seems unlikely since she's implicitly Duval's love-interest. In the last instalment Duval has a goatee he didn't have at first. I think he suddenly acquires it in part four.

The feature was clearly intended as an adventure serial in the Three Musketeers vein. Unless you're interested in the work of Siegel and Shuster it's not really worth your time. The storyline is too episodic to be absorbing. Shuster's art is cartoony and sketchy, but he clearly took care over the inn instalments and he did a good job with the costumes. Perhaps he used movies for reference. The colour of the inn instalments is pleasing. The first instalment was B&W, and the last has dull colours.

Siegel and Shuster reused the Henri Duval name for the villain in the "Dr Occult" story in More Fun Comics #24.

The first version of this post displaced the thread Randy Jackson reads Lee/Ditko Dr. Strange from the homepage.


...Was " Radio Squad " an attempt to clone the King Features newspaper strip " Radio Patrol " , which is yet another fairly-successful-in-its-da y(with radio series and a movie serial versions) but even the large corporate syndicates weren't as " legacy strip "-obsessed in that day therefore it became gone fairly quickly by today's standards vintage strip that I've never read a single installmentof  , and I just , this night , looked it up in Wikipedia for the first time and Toonopedia again...you think ?????
Luke Blanchard said:

"Henri Duval"

New Fun #6, More Fun #7-#8, More Fun Comics #9-#10

This was one of the first two series by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. It debuted in New Fun #6, along with "Dr Occult", but unlike the latter it only lasted five instalments. The first four were one page long, and the last two pages. I haven't read the second instalment.

The earlier instalments were bylined "by Jerome Siegel and Joe Shuster", and the last "by Hugh Langley". ("Dr Occult" was bylined "by Leger and Reuths".) The last instalment is less carefully-drawn than the preceding ones - the backgrounds are much sparer - but the GCD takes it to also be by Siegel and Shuster and the art looks like Shuster's work. I first thought the instalment's sparer appearance was likely due to Shuster's workload - "Dr Occult" went to two pages the same issue - but duo were also doing "Federal Men" in New Comics and it went down to two pages from its initial four around the same time, so perhaps not.

The strip was a serial about a soldier of fortune in 17th century France. (The date is not specified, but that's what the costumes indicate.) In part one a carriage's way is blocked by a duel between Duval and a man who insulted his clothing. A young woman from the carriage party pleads with Duval to spare his defeated foe. His rides after the carriage to find out her name, and saves it from an attack by brigands. The woman reveals that he has saved the king, travelling incognito, from an attack arranged by his enemies.

When part three opens it is night, and Duval and co. are upstairs at an inn. Duval has apparently been protecting the king from an attacker. A party of soldiers arrive and force their way in downstairs. Duval thinks they're the king's men but the king tells him they're "enemies in disguise". Duval slips onto the roof and sees the inn is surrounded.

In part four the king and his companions are taken prisoner. Duval knocks out the soldiers' leader and takes his outer garments to impersonate him. He directs the men to search the inn while he guards the prisoners, and then absconds with them by horseback. But the soldiers quickly catch on and pursue them.

In part five Duval and co. hide as the soldiers ride past. A straggler arrives and Duval duels him. As they fight the other soldiers return, and Duval's companions "treacherously desert him". He is overwhelmed by the soldiers and taken prisoner. They take him to a jail in a nearby town and report to their commander. He questions their having only one prisoner and is told the others got away. Duval says he doesn't understand.

And there the series ended. The next issue saw the start of a new series by the creators, "Calling All Cars" (later "Radio Squad"), and the beginning of an adaptation of The Three Musketeers by others. Presumably the feature was killed to make way for these.

The last instalment could be setting up a twist that the 'king' is really a fugitive, but that would make his pretty companion a deceiver, and that seems unlikely since she's implicitly Duval's love-interest. In the last instalment Duval has a goatee he didn't have at first. I think he suddenly acquires it in part four.

The feature was clearly intended as an adventure serial in the Three Musketeers vein. Unless you're interested in the work of Siegel and Shuster it's not really worth your time. The storyline is too episodic to be absorbing. Shuster's art is cartoony and sketchy, but he clearly took care over the inn instalments and he did a good job with the costumes. Perhaps he used movies for reference. The colour of the inn instalments is pleasing. The first instalment was B&W, and the last has dull colours.

Siegel and Shuster reused the Henri Duval name for the villain in the "Dr Occult" story in More Fun Comics #24.

The first version of this post displaced the thread Randy Jackson reads Lee/Ditko Dr. Strange from the homepage.

It's quite possible "Calling All Cars"/"Radio Squad" was modelled after Radio Patrol, but the radio cars theme was present elsewhere in popular culture so I can’t say it must have been. The IMDB tells me there was a movie called Radio Patrol in 1932(1) and one called Calling All Cars in 1935. There was also a radio show called Calling All Cars, but reportedly it didn’t play everywhere so it may be Siegel and Shuster never heard of it.

"Calling All Cars"/"Radio Squad" was dominated by its hero, Sandy Kean. He was a Siegel and Shuster aggressive tough guy. They were already doing "Federal Men" in New Comics, so perhaps "Calling All Cars" was created as a match for it.

(1) The serial based on the newspaper strip didn't come out until the year after "Calling All Cars"/"Radio Squad" started in 1936.

On reflection, I don't think Duval does have a beard in the second-last episode. The scan I read isn't clear, and that could be a shadow under his chin instead.

Since the instalments, except the last, were only a page each, it could be they were produced close together and the last instalment was done after a gap. That would explain the instalment's more impressionistic style better than my suggestion about Shuster's workload, and why Duval suddenly has that goatee.

I said the colours of the last instalment were dull: I think it was done in limited colour.

Martin O'Hearn has a post on what he takes to have been the last Siegel and Shuster story here.

This post displaced the thread John Dunbar re-reads Tales of Suspense starring Iron Man from the homepage.

The Rise of Western Comics

Part 1 1935-1939

Westerns in American comic books go back to the Dell's original The Funnies from 1929-30, in the form of Boody Rogers's cartoony "Deadwood Gulch". Instaments can be seen here and here. There were also three Westerns in the initial line-up of DC-to-be’s New Fun: "Jack Woods", "Buckskin Jim", and the humorous "Loco Luke". "Jack Woods" instalments appeared on the covers of #1-#2, #5, and a "Loco Luke" one on #4.

Other early comics with mixed contents also carried Western features. I won't try to list all of these, as what I mean to trace is the rise of Western titles. The original line-up of DC’s Action Comics included a Western called “Chuck Dawson”, which lasted to #22, after which it was replaced by "Black Pirate".

“Captain Jim of the Texas Rangers” was the first Western series to have a lengthy run as a lead feature. It debuted in DC’s New Comics v. 1 #1 as “Captain Bill of the Texas Rangers” and was renamed in #4. In #5 it was moved into the lead slot, and it then led most up to its end in New Adventure Comics #27. But most of the covers up to v.2 #10 [22] had humorous images, and they afterwards had adventure images that weren't tied to the features. So he was never cover-featured.

The first title devoted to a single genre was Comic Magazine Company’s Detective Picture Stories, which commenced in late 1936. But two Westerns followed at the start of 1937. These were the same publisher’s Western Picture Stories, and Chesler’s Star Ranger. February saw the start of Detective Comics and a one-shot from Dell called Western Action Thrillers.

Western Picture Stories only lasted 4 issues. Star Ranger was published by Chesler for 6, but was continued by Ultem and then Centaur. Centaur changed the name to Cowboy Comics and then Star Ranger Funnies. The series ended in 1939. The total run was 20 issues. The title’s contents were mostly a mix of serious and humorous Western features, but a little non-Western stuff appeared in it as well.

After New Fun the next DC issues with Western covers were New Comics v1 #2 (on sale late 1935) and More Fun Comics v.2 #11 [23] (1937). The former cover featured Sagebrush n' Cactus from inside. The latter was humorous.

DC started using non-feature adventure covers with the commencement of Detective Comics. Adventure Comics was the second title to adopt them, and Action Comics used them, but not exclusively, for its first year and a half. More Fun Comics stuck with humorous covers (except for #30), and finally adopted the style with #42. These covers then gave way to covers featuring superheroes.

Western or frontier images appeared on New Adventure Comics #23, #24, #26, Action Comics #8, and More Fun Comics #45, #46, #51. But what you'll find if you look these issues up is most of them were man-vs-nature images.

While some publishers of the era followed DC and published original material, others followed Famous Funnies and published strip reprints. (Some did both, and even DC ran Fu Manchu reprints in Detective Comics.) Strip reprints appeared in mixed titles, and in one-shot issues devoted to particular features. Several companies published one-shot series with varying stars.

David McKay mainly published reprints, but in 1938 the publisher's Feature Book #16 featured a book-length original "Redmen" story by Jimmy Thompson. This was the first Western comic, original or reprint, devoted to a single feature.(1)

David McKay published issues of Feature Book devoted to The Lone Ranger strip reprints in 1939 and 1941. It's not a surprise this didn't happen earlier: the newspaper strip only started in 1938. United Feature did Broncho Bill issues of Single Series in 1939 and 1940. The first issue devoted to Red Ryder, from Hawley, appeared in 1940; the GCD galleries it as the first issue of Red Ryder Comics. Little Joe had to wait until the start of the second series of Dell's Four Color in 1942.

In 1939 Dell devoted two issues of Large Feature Comic to The Lone Ranger. #3 hasn’t yet been indexed at the GCD, but it says #7’s story was original and consists of “full page and 1/4 page illustrations along with text story”. The artist was Henry L. Vallely. That description, and Vallely’s being the artist, suggests to me the story was originally intended for a Big Little Book.

I count Max Gaines's All-American Publications (AA) as a separate company from DC. In 1939 it published a title called Movie Comics which mixed fumetti adaptations of movies with comics content. Andy Devine and Gene Autry were featured on the covers of #2 and #3 respectively. The series adapted several Western films, including three starring Autry.

At the start of 1939 "The Phantom Rider” was featured on Centaur’s Star Comics v.2 #1 [17] and at the end “Bull’s-Eye Bill” appeared on Novelty’s Target Comics v.1 #1, but in both cases it was the only time. AA's the Whip from Flash Comics debuted with the title and had one starring cover-turn, on #4 in early 1940.

So when the 1930s ended there were Westerns in the back pages of mixed titles, but no regular Western titles or mixed titles with a regular Western lead feature. When Fiction House expanded its line in 1939 it chose to do a he-man action title (Fight Comics), a jungle title (Jungle Comics) and a sci-fi title (Planet Comics). It didn't do a Western.

(1) Feature Comics #1 from 1937 featured King of the Royal Mounted. But I don't count Mounties stories as Westerns.  

The first version of this post displaced the thread Books about Comic Books from the homepage.

Part 2 1940-1944

Tom Mix stories appeared in Dell titles in 1936-37 and Western’s Crackajack Funnies in 1938-39. You could even say earlier, as according to the GCD comics form Tom Mix Ralston Wheat Cereal ads appeared on the back covers of New Fun #1-#2.

In 1940-42 the Ralston-Purina Company produced 9 issues of a giveaway called Tom Mix Comics. They were mixed anthologies, but the issues carried two Tom Mix stories, and he was featured on most covers. The stories were drawn by Fred Meagher, who later drew ME’s Straight Arrow.

The title continued for another 3 issues as Tom Mix Commandos Comics. These used their Tom Mix pages on one story and recast him as a soldier fighting WWII. He was next used as a comics star at Fawcett, but in between DC ran a biography of Mix in Real Fact Comics #5 in 1946.

I mentioned Hawley's 1940 one-shot of Red Ryder reprints. In 1941 it commenced an ongoing Red Ryder Comics. This reprinted a mix of newspaper strips, but led with Red Ryder and featured Red on the covers. From 1942 the title was continued by K. K. Publications. The GCD’s page on Western explains K. K.’s titles were printed by Western, distributed by Dell, and eventually branded as Dell titles, so it lists them as Dells.

The Vigilante's feature commenced in Action Comics #42 in Sep. 1941 (on sale). It ran to #197 in 1954, but since Superman held the covers his only cover appearance from the run was the ensemble cover on #52 (1942). Very soon after his debut he was included as one of the Seven Soldiers of Victory in Leading Comics, and he appeared on the covers with the other heroes while the team's feature ran (1941-45).

The next Western comic was the first issue of Fawcett's Gene Autry Comics. Autry stories had appeared in Dell titles in 1938-39, and I mentioned the adaptations in Movie Comics. Fawcett often dipped its toe in the water with a one-shot before committing to a series. It tried Gene Autry Comics at the end of 1941, and continued the series just over six months later. In 1943, after ten issues, the title moved to Dell. Dell continued it for another 2 and afterwards featured Autry in Four Color. Judging by the issues indexed at the GCD the Fawcett issues featured one long story backed by short Western items, and the Dell ones had more than one with like backing features.

In early 1942 Fawcett tried Golden Arrow. Golden Arrow was a hero who fought crime in the West with archery. He had appeared in Whiz Comics from its debut in late 1939. The opening instalment placed him in the present day - it has a references to both World Wars - but in comics and movies the modern West was sometimes hard to distinguish from the Old West, and some instalments of the long-running series call him a hero of the Old West. Toonopedia discusses the setting and notes he teamed up with Captain Marvel and Spy Smasher in 1943, so apparently he was still supposed to be a contemporary hero at that point. A second issue of Golden Arrow appeared in early 1943, and Fawcett tried the title again the war.

Famous Funnies first ran Big Chief Wahoo in #44 (1938), and the strip was intermittently cover-featured. In 1942 Eastern Color gave the feature its own title. The issues indexed at the GCD carried Sunday reprints. 7 issues appeared, the last at the end of 1944.

In 1933 Fawcett tried Hopalong Cassidy, simultaneously with the second issue of Golden Arrow. The title character originated in a long-running short story and novel series by Clarence E. Mulford, and was widely known from a B movie series starring William Boyd. Fawcett had commenced a “Hopalong Cassidy” feature, using Boyd's likeness, in Master Comics #33 in 1942. (It replaced "Buck Jones, Frontier Marshall", which had run in the title from the first issue.) There was no follow-up issue of Hopalong Cassidy at the time, and the feature's first run in Master Comics ended in 1944. But Fawcett was to try it again.

Dell commenced featuring Roy Rogers in Four Color in Feb. 1944. That was also the month Gene Autry Comics ended, but Autry was featured twice in Four Color, and Rogers a second time, before the end of the year. In 1945 the title started doing The Lone Ranger too.

“Firehair” commenced in Fiction House’s Rangers Comics in #21, 1944. It took over the lead slot on its debut, but didn’t become the cover feature until #40 in 1948.

At some point Baily Publishing Company put out a Cisco Kid Comics one-shot, with a lead “The Cisco Kid” story and non-Western supporting features. This issue is copyrighted 1944 and dated Winter, so it possibly appeared late in the year. Charles Voight drew the lead tale. The character originated in a story by O. Henry and had been popularised by films. The character next appeared in Dell's Four Color, but not until 1950.

The final item I'll mention in this section is Gilberton’s Classic Comics. This did adaptations of three of James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking novels: The Last of the Mohicans in 1942, The Deerslayer in 1944, and The Pathfinder in 1946. The others were adapted after the series became Classics Illustrated.

So at the end of 1944 the ongoing Western titles were Red Ryder Comics and the Roy Rogers and Gene Autry series of Four Color one-shots. The last issue of Big Chief Wahoo had just appeared, and the Cisco Kid Comics one-shot may have just done so. Firehair's series had recently commenced in Rangers Comics and was appearing in the lead slot, but she wasn't being cover-featured. Fawcett had taken several goes at starting a Western title but wasn't doing one.

Part 3 1945-1947

One of the features in Fawcett’s Funny Animals was “Billy the Kid”, about a wily gunslinger goat. Like other Fawcett funny animal characters he was occasionally used in filler slots in other titles, but not often. The covers primarily featured Hoppy, but included ensemble images in which Billy appeared. In 1945-46 Fawcett tried Billy in his own title for three issues.

In 1946 ME started a children’s humour title called Cowboys ‘N’ Injuns. The title carried a mix of bigfoot and funny animals stories and ran to 1957. The last issue, #5, lacked a funny animal tale and instead had “Spurs Larkin”, a comedy-adventure feature about a singing cowboy. In 1949 ME published a single issue of Cowboys and Indians that continued the numbering. This had a number of the Cowboys ‘N’ Injuns features, including another “Spurs Larkin” one, unless it was the same story under another name. But its lead story was an account of the life of Doc Holliday which was drawn by Dick Ayers. 2 more Cowboys ‘N’ Injuns issues followed in 1951-52, the first of which (the GCD tells me) was all-reprint, and the second mostly so.

At the start of 1946 the major features in Red Ryder Comics were "Red Ryder" and "King of the Royal Mounted". The lesser features were mostly reprinted strips, and aside from "Little Beaver" non-Western.(1) In the course of the year the supporting features other than "Telecomics"(2) were replaced by Western ones. From what I can tell this first happened in #33, which ran a "Young Hawk" instalment in their place. Their lasting Western replacement was "The Kiyotee Kids", which arrived in #36 or #37.(3)

Starting in March Fawcett tried Golden Arrow again, for three quarterly issues. A final issue appeared the next year with the title Golden Arrow Western. The hero's feature in Whiz Comics continued until the penultimate issue at the start of 1953.

In April Dell launched a new Gene Autry Comics. This title was the beginning of the Western boom. In the 1950s Westerns were so commercial even the horses got their own titles, and Dell commenced a Gene Autry's Champion ongoing in 1951 (after two Four Color try-outs). In 1955 the two titles were combined as Gene Autry and Champion, which continued Gene Autry Comics's numbering. The series ended at the end of 1958 with #121. Autry stories also appeared in Dell's Western Roundup.

In May 1946 Fawcett tried Hopalong Cassidy again. The title resumed in September, and quickly became a monthly. At the end of 1947 the feature was restored to the line-up of Master Comics, but in 1948 it was moved to the new Real Western Hero/Western Hero in the lead slot. In 1949 Fawcett started an additional title called Bill Boyd Western, put “Bill Boyd” in Western Hero, and made “Hopalong Cassidy” the lead feature of Six-Gun Heroes. When Fawcett ended its line in 1953 DC picked Hopalong Cassidy up and continued the title to 1959.

The first issues of two new Western series were dated for Jan. 1947. One was the debut issue of Avon's Cow Puncher Comics, which I believe was the first anthology Western of the boom. It ran 7 issues. The last issue was copyrighted to 1949.

The other was Dearfield Publishing Company's "Red" Rabbit Comics. This carried a mix of funny animal features, but the title feature had a Western setting.

Beginning in March Billy the Kid displaced Hoppy the Marvel Bunny from the covers of Fawcett’s Funny Animals for several issues. But the reason was apparently weak sales rather than faith in the character, as after Hoppy returned to them the title went to a quarterly schedule for a period. In 1949-50 Billy was dropped and Hoppy stopped turning into the Marvel Bunny.

In October Pines commenced Broncho Bill. This carried strip reprints, and ran to 1950 for a total of 12 issues.

Three long-running titles debuted in November. The first was Fawcett's Tom Mix Western, which was a monthly from its first issue. In early 1948 the "Tom Mix" feature was added to Wow Comics. Later in the year the title was replaced by Real Western Hero, and Mix's feature continued there. At the same point it was added to the line-up of Master Comics, and appeared there into 1951. Tom Mix Western finally ended with #61 in early 1953.

DC's launch was Western Comics, which ran to #85 in 1960. The first issue cover-featured "The Cowboy Marshal", which ran to #42. But the covers and lead slot were quickly taken over by the "The Wyoming Kid", drawn by Howard Sherman.(4) The Wyoming Kid was a gunslinger hero who wore a big hat and a loose red shirt with big buttons. He's forgotten today, but he lasted all the way to the final issue and also had a good run in World's Finest Comics. The first 4 issues of the title also featured an Old West version of the Vigilante, in stories drawn by Mort Meskin.(5) He was replaced in #5 by Nighthawk. The remaining feature from the debut line-up was "Rodeo Rick".

Dell's launch was Roy Rogers Comics. In 1951 it commenced Roy Rogers' Trigger (again after a Four Color try-out). In 1955 they were combined as Roy Rogers and Trigger, which continued Roy Rogers Comics numbering, and the title ended with #145 in 1961, the month before Fantastic Four started.

Western produced a giveaway comic called Boys' and Girls' March of Comics for many years. "Roy Rogers" and "Gene Autry" issues appeared in the series. The GCD's gallery doesn't have dates for most issue,  but it looks like "Roy Rogers" first appeared in 1947, and "Gene Autry" in 1948.

(1) Red Ryder and King of the Royal Mounted were both promoted by Stephen Slesinger. Little Beaver was Red Ryder's topper.

(2) "Telecomics", which appeared in 1945-46, is listed on the GCD's page on #40 as copyrighted 1946 by Telecomics, Inc., N.Y. That indicates it was connected to Slesinger as he used that company to produce a TV cartoon called Telecomics. Subsequent King of the Royal Mounted reprints had framing "Telecomics" sequences. Apparently they depicted kids turning on the TV to watch the instalment.

(3) #36 isn't yet indexed. The GCD says #35 had "The Kokomo Kid". It lists its genre as humor. It may have been a comic Western, but a comic boxing movie called The Kid from Kokomo appeared in 1939.

(4) From #43 he lost the covers and lead slot to Pow-Wow Smith, moving across from Detective Comics. From #77 Smith lost them in turn to John Wayne Matt Savage, Trail Boss.

(5) The modern-day Vig had just appeared in a Columbia serial starring Ralph Byrd. DC put out a mini-issue of Action Comics with an adaptation of the serial by Meskin as a tie-in.

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