Now that the show has debuted, what are your thoughts?

Views: 6930

Replies are closed for this discussion.

Replies to This Discussion

Well, as someone who favored the original concept that Thomas and Martha Wayne were the unfortunate victims of a random street crime committed by a killer who got clean away, I hold no love for the notion that their murders are a mystery that will loom over the entire run of this show.

Mr. Silver Age said:

 I think Gotham went the most wrong when it stretched out its plots over many episodes with no satisfying resolution. Maybe it's the latter part of that assessment more than the former part that was the problem, and they'll resolve that.

I think the "no satisfying resolution" part is the bigger problem. Here's hoping they have figured that out.

Mr. Silver Age said:

I thought there was far too much of Penguin betraying both Falcone and Maroni back and forth for either one to trust him well past when they still were.

Agreed. Why either Falcone or Maroni didn't cap him earlier, I can't understand.

Mr. Silver Age said:

The Fish Mooney long-play adventure in the second half went nowhere interesting (as well as being implausible in her instant ability to take over and lead the group by offering up a few to be killed at random and living upstairs with the captors/killers, let alone her turning Selina into a gun moll).

These poor souls were trapped on an island, with goons occasionally grabbing one of their number and taking them off to be killed -- and Fish Mooney becomes their leader by telling them that practice will continue but they're all better off because I'm in charge, even though she won't stop them? 

I hope the show hired a new story editor. Ben McKenzie is right about one thing: There's too much competition for them to coast on such nonsense.

I think there are a number of Batman villains they could do prequels for, and there's no reason they can't introduce more quirky guys on their own, who would lead up to the full-bore costumed wackos Batman has to face. It seems like there should be more wackiness already.

And they really missed a bet by not turning Barbara into a super-villain. That look she gave the Ogre in the first part of that arc was the most interesting thing she did all year.

It might be fun to do an arc with a proto-super-hero vigilante

There's always the Flying Fox. I think something like that would perk up Bruce's story arc a whole lot. Those steely gazes aren't working.

-- MSA

I was thinking more along the lines of a proto-hero whose mistakes Bruce could learn from (as opposed to the dozen or so people who turned up in Smallville who were working dual identities without Clark ever twigging to the idea that he could do that too, until Lois created the "mild-mannered reporter" concept for him!)  Bruce becoming the Flying Fox (or the Executioner, or especially Harvey Harris' apprentice, "Robin") might be just too much "The Adventures of Young Batman" for most of the viewers.  Still, the only other real option for Bruce is to send him off somewhere (everywhere?) to study the various things he'll need to know.  Plus, that will make it easier for the people of Gotham to forget about the strange, intense boy he is now when he returns as the dissolute "millionaire playboy" to serve as a cover for his nocturnal crime busting.

Having your intense hero act intense in his normal id isn't a good way to cover his secret. But then it's very unlikely the show would run enough seasons to get to him becoming Batman. You can't go into a show assuming you're going to get five or six or ten seasons, and dropping the done in one villains for long arcs sounds like they're going to drag things out from now on. Like that Hulk story that ran three years and never did say who the main villain was.

...A PAD-era Hulk story ?

Ron M. said:

Having your intense hero act intense in his normal id isn't a good way to cover his secret. But then it's very unlikely the show would run enough seasons to get to him becoming Batman. You can't go into a show assuming you're going to get five or six or ten seasons, and dropping the done in one villains for long arcs sounds like they're going to drag things out from now on. Like that Hulk story that ran three years and never did say who the main villain was.

I think citing the addition of more episodes doesn't wash as a culprit for the problems. I'm a bad judge because I pretty much enjoyed the show from beginning to end, except for the forgotten murdered cop. The Flash show added more episodes and did it seamlessly. I'll be interested in how season 2 turns out.

After Heroes Reborn. Betty Ross showed up alive calling herself Mister Blue.
 
Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...A PAD-era Hulk story ?

Ron M. said:

Having your intense hero act intense in his normal id isn't a good way to cover his secret. But then it's very unlikely the show would run enough seasons to get to him becoming Batman. You can't go into a show assuming you're going to get five or six or ten seasons, and dropping the done in one villains for long arcs sounds like they're going to drag things out from now on. Like that Hulk story that ran three years and never did say who the main villain was.

Richard Willis said:

I think citing the addition of more episodes doesn't wash as a culprit for the problems. I'm a bad judge because I pretty much enjoyed the show from beginning to end, except for the forgotten murdered cop. The Flash show added more episodes and did it seamlessly. I'll be interested in how season 2 turns out.

I agree with this assessment. I would also like to add, at the beginning of last season, I preferred Gotham to Flash, by by the end my ranking of the two had switched. Still like them both, though, and plan to watch them both again this year.

Wait, I have to rank the shows I like now? AAAAAHHHHHHH!

I did it all year, as I don't watch them immediately. So if I'm falling behind, I start figuring which one I won't miss if it has to wait awhile. Flash and Arrow were first up, especially as they started crossing over. SHIELD was next, at least for the first half, but then it faded (I just caught up on it a few weeks ago). Gotham was the last one and the first to wait, at least until I decided to catch back up so I could comment here. So I swapped it with SHIELD.

That's going to happen even moreso this year, with Legends and Supergirl included (not to mention IZombie and Walking Dead). On Demand TV is great, but it also makes it pretty apparent to me which ones I can't wait to see--and which ones I can.

I always watched Flash right away, because it was just burning through plot like a drunken sailor. Arrow was next, but that second half was a downer. I'm hoping the new, lighter style for this year will give Flash a run for its money. But geez, Jay Garrick AND Jesse Quick? Good luck, Ollie!

-- MSA

Richard Willis said:

I think citing the addition of more episodes doesn't wash as a culprit for the problems. I'm a bad judge because I pretty much enjoyed the show from beginning to end, except for the forgotten murdered cop. The Flash show added more episodes and did it seamlessly. I'll be interested in how season 2 turns out.

I think citing the addition of more episodes as a culprit for the problems is an admission of incompetence, because shows deal with that problem all the time.

Like the gone-too-soon Chuck; it was always on the edge of cancellation, and every year, the network would order just a few episodes, and Chuck's writers would write a season finale that could also serve as a series finale ... but the show would get renewed and the network would order more episodes. Coming up with more stories is what writers are supposed to do. 

It doesn't even have to just be an extension. They could find out 2/3 of the way through that they'll have more episodes and have a chance to work them in. It sounds like Gotham was saying they had to pad out their stories to stretch them to the end, which really reflects badly on them if that's what they meant. Having seen the season, it sounds plausible.

Kurt Busiek wrote UNTOLD TALES that wove in and out of 30-year-old classic, well-known stories that were entertaining and didn't impact the ones already told. I'd think highly paid show writers could come up with ideas for a few more episodes if they suddenly had the chance for them. A few more twists in some of those stories would certainly have helped them.

I understand that a lot of shows are being cut to 10 or 16 or whatever, and a lot of critics and even show runners are hailing this as letting the shows be as long as necessary without padding. But why are they going into their shows each week with the assumption that some of it is going to be padding to stretch to the unbearable length of 22 shows per year? Just how limited is their imagination?

-- MSA

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2020   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service