If DC and Marvel Fell Under the Same Corporate Roof, and You Were in Charge...

Once again, there is speculation that DC and Marvel could end up under the same corporate "roof", growing out of the events we're discussing here.   

I have no idea how probable any of this is.  My suspicion is "not very", but what do I know?

Setting probability aside, if such a thing did somehow happen, and you were somehow given the book by ConHugeCo as to  how the characters should be handled, how would you proceed?

A few possibilities:

  1. Merge the two universes after the great-granddaddy of all comic book events?
  2. Keep them separate, but establish them as being in the same multiverse, so that crossovers are relatively easy?
  3. Keep them entirely separate?
  4. Something else?

Views: 329

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I would probably go with option #2, with annual JLA/Avengers crossovers.

I might also have Superman and Spider-Man "swap universes" for a year. 

I would find Roy Thomas and give him free reign to do a whole line of comics blending the DC World War II-set teams and characters with the Marvel World War II-set teams and characters. 

So what if it means the war would be over in 15 minutes? 

A New Gods/Eternals crossover would be interesting, by someone such as Tom Scioli. 

I think it would be interesting to explore how the world would react if an army of American super-heroes ended the war in a month.

ClarkKent_DC said:

I would find Roy Thomas and give him free reign to do a whole line of comics blending the DC World War II-set teams and characters with the Marvel World War II-set teams and characters. 

So what if it means the war would be over in 15 minutes? 

Keep 'em separate - #2 sounds the best. Although an on-going Brave and the Bold team up book might be fun teaming a different hero from each universe. Some of the lesser heroes could get time in the spotlight that way. Plus you would get to see how similar heroes would play off each other like Hawkeye and Green Arrow, Plastic Man and Mr Fantastic, Dr Fate and Dr Strange etc.

#2 seems far and away the best option -- and I love Jeff's suggestion of Superman & Spider-Man* switching universes for a year, and Doc P's ongoing team-up book. 

*But does the hyphen travel with Spider-Man? Or would Spiderman join the DCU, and Super-Man inherit it?

"But does the hyphen travel with Spider-Man?  Or would Spiderman join the DCU, and Super-Man inherit it?"

I remember noticing very early on in my comics reading career that Marvel always spelled "through" as "thru".  This would make sense if each universe has its own native punctuation, spelling and so on.  In which case, I feel that it should be "Spiderman" and "Super-Man" if they switch universes.

Stan Lee used the compound word "comicbook." 

I would simply say the other characters have always been there, their adventures just not covered on a regular basis by the then "rival" company. There is precedent for this between all the previous DC-Marvel crossovers, but I'm sure some executive(s) higher up than me would demand Option 1 for obviou$ rea$on$.

And the idea of an annual JLAvengers team up ala the old League-Justice Society meetings is good too.

Definitely agree with the idea of Roy Thomas overhauling the World War 2 era, if not the entire Golden Age, of both companies into a coherent whole. The one thing I would insist on in that part is that while I have no problem with and support LGBTQ characters, to undo the retconning of Alan Scott as a member of that community. Decades of backstory—especially with his version of the Harlequin—say otherwise, no matter how good the intentions of whoever came up with the idea were.

My only other immediate/major goals would be streamlining the corporate output of the new entity and making sure its combined continuity works.

There is no point, in my humble opinion, of flooding a limited market with so many titles of one character and/or group. I'm surprised Batman (for example) hasn't collapsed from sheer exhaustion, given the number of titles he's currently in!

One regular title and membership in only one team would be my personal limitation on every character. The only exceptions would be flagship titles like Action and Detective Comics.

Otherwise, I would definitely entertain ideas for reviving the anthology titles of the past like Adventure Comics, World's Finest, Tales of Suspense, Tales to Astonish, etc. to support the wide variety of characters the new company would have.

And if I could do something about the high cost of individual issues ($3.99 and up for a comic nowadays? GOOD GRIEF!) while keeping the "suits" happy...

But then again, if you're going to dream, you might as well dream big so you're not as disappointed when they don't come true. *sigh*

"There is precedent for this between all the previous DC-Marvel crossovers..."

Well, not all of them...

In hindsight Jeff, you may be right about DC versus Marvel but it's been so long ago I can't remember the set up to JLA-Avengers off hand except George Perez was ecstatic about finally getting to do it. But the multiverse certainly didn't seem to play any big part in all the crossovers before then, especially the original super-sized tabloid ones.

Those were the days...

Option #2, with a third, completely separate universe that retools and combines only the most interesting and/or iconic of the characters in a new continuity.

Of course, comic fans wouldn't argue at all about who should be in that third universe, right?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service