If DC and Marvel Fell Under the Same Corporate Roof, and You Were in Charge...

Once again, there is speculation that DC and Marvel could end up under the same corporate "roof", growing out of the events we're discussing here.   

I have no idea how probable any of this is.  My suspicion is "not very", but what do I know?

Setting probability aside, if such a thing did somehow happen, and you were somehow given the book by ConHugeCo as to  how the characters should be handled, how would you proceed?

A few possibilities:

  1. Merge the two universes after the great-granddaddy of all comic book events?
  2. Keep them separate, but establish them as being in the same multiverse, so that crossovers are relatively easy?
  3. Keep them entirely separate?
  4. Something else?

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Pre-Crisis,  they were always vague about where Smallville was, as they were about all of DC's fictional cities. The idea that it was in the farm country in Upstate New York comes the idea that it wasn't that far away from Metropolis, which was for all intents and purposes a stand-in for New York City, per Michael L. Fleischer's ever-wonderful The Great Superman Book

Personally, I always figured Smallville was in Iowa. Definitively stating it's in Kansas is post-Crisis nonsense.   Pre-Crisis nonsense is the notion that Metropolis is in Delaware.

Gotham City tends to be in New York, New Jersey or Illinois, depending on what anyone chooses to believe, but that fits with the general vagueness of pre-Crisis comics that would place it a short drive from Metropolis or many miles away.

Pre or post Crisis, I agree and have always thought of Metropolis and Gotham as being within a couple of hours drive of each other, regardless of whether that puts them in the same or neighboring states.

(Didn't the original pre-Crisis Superman #300 show Metropolis being formed out of a major chunk of New York, including NYC itself?)

Smallville is DEFINITELY in farm country, which tends to put it somewhere along the Mississippi, but even if you place it on the western side of the river, it's still well before the Grand Canyon.

When I was reading the Superboy stories they were never specific about the locations of Smallville and, for that matter, Metropolis. Since Siegel and Shuster were from Cleveland a case could be made that Metropolis was just as likely to be Chicago. I'm not sure when Smallville was placed in Kansas. I was away from comics for a decade and away from the Superman books longer. The first indication I saw was in Kingdom Come, when the destruction of Kansas apparently included Smallville.

Luke Blanchard said:

DC acquired the AAC properties in 1945, but then gradually dropped them except for Wonder Woman and Mutt & Jeff. (Funny Stuff continued, but its original slate was dropped and it was renamed Dodo and the Frog in 1954.) Granted, some of the properties - the Flash, Green Lantern and the JSA - have been DC mainstays since their late 1950s reboots, the JSA as the JLA. Of the Quality heroes DC was initially only interested in Blackhawk. It ran his title into the ground in a decade (but it kept two of the titles it acquired, Heart Throbs and G. I. Combat, going longer).

I think the All American properties featuring superheroes would have continued longer except that the end of WWII coincided with massive sales drops in superhero comics.

I always thought of Metropolis as being a Midwestern city.

Richard Willis said:

When I was reading the Superboy stories they were never specific about the locations of Smallville and, for that matter, Metropolis. Since Siegel and Shuster were from Cleveland a case could be made that Metropolis was just as likely to be Chicago. I'm not sure when Smallville was placed in Kansas. I was away from comics for a decade and away from the Superman books longer. The first indication I saw was in Kingdom Come, when the destruction of Kansas apparently included Smallville.

Going whole hog on this  ...

Lee Houston, Junior said:

Pre or post Crisis, I agree and have always thought of Metropolis and Gotham as being within a couple of hours drive of each other, regardless of whether that puts them in the same or neighboring states.

(Didn't the original pre-Crisis Superman #300 show Metropolis being formed out of a major chunk of New York, including NYC itself?)

Superman #300 (June 1976), set in the then-distant future of 2001(!), identified Metropolis as being the whole coast from Boston all the way south to Washington, D.C.

Richard Willis said:

When I was reading the Superboy stories they were never specific about the locations of Smallville and, for that matter, Metropolis. Since Siegel and Shuster were from Cleveland a case could be made that Metropolis was just as likely to be Chicago. I'm not sure when Smallville was placed in Kansas. I was away from comics for a decade and away from the Superman books longer. The first indication I saw was in Kingdom Come, when the destruction of Kansas apparently included Smallville.

Smallville was definitively placed in Kansas during John Byrne's reboot. I vaguely have the sense he got that idea from all those wheat fields shown in Superman the movie, even though those were filmed in Canada.

The Baron said:

I always thought of Metropolis as being a Midwestern city.

Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster were from Cleveland, but before that, they were from Toronto. Superman's hometown, which wasn't given a name in its first few appearances, had elements of both, most particularly the Toronto Daily Star newspaper.

Over time (per Fleischer), Metropolis gradually acquired New York City landmarks. Most had the name slightly changed -- the Metropolis Stock Exchange, the Metropolis State Building, etc. -- but some weren't, like Grand Central Station and the Statue of Liberty (which, oddly, is also in Gotham City, per Fleischer's other masterpiece on Batman).

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