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ClarkKent_DC said:

I remember the Sun publisher saying he didn't see the value in having two political cartoonists, specifically saying he'd rather hire another reporter than another cartoonist. 

Speaking of the value newsroom managers place on cartoons, I just remembered a circumstance regarding Jules Feiffer, the legendary, Pulitzer Prize winner for the Village Voice in New York. The Voice wanted to cut him from the staff in 1997, but wanted to get his work through the Universal Press Syndicate for $200 a week.

Another nail in the coffin. From The Seattle Times"Starbucks Stores to Stop Selling Newspapers in the Fall, Pointing to 'Changing Customer Behavior'"

Bad enough you no longer see USA Today newspaper boxes any more. Now this.

We've seen this before, like with Sears and Kmart, when two weak companies join to form a bigger weak company.

From AP News: "GateHouse, Gannett to Merge for $1.4B, Build Newspaper Giant"

They're going into this crowing about cost savings, which means shedding jobs. For newspapers, this means centralizing things like the copy desk and page design. Gannett is already packaging entire pages from USA Today and placing them in its constituent newspapers. Expect to see more of this and fewer stories written and edited by local staffs. 

I wonder if printed newspapers will end up like buggy rides, sort of living nostalgia trips that you can get if you want one bad enough, but not something you see every day.

It's got me laughing as I research old sci-fi comics set in the future, and reporters work for newspapers. Not news organizations, news papers. Nobody imagined the Internet until it got here, of course, but you'd think the writers would have realized that newspaper distribution to, say, Mars would be a terrible waste of jet fuel (not to mention that "daily" newspapers would arrive days or weeks late). And that they'd follow that thought to some other sort of news distribution, even if "internet" wasn't yet in their vocabulary.

I love watching old sci-fi, and noticing what they totally didn't see coming.

Captain Comics said:

It's got me laughing as I research old sci-fi comics set in the future, and reporters work for newspapers. Not news organizations, news papers. Nobody imagined the Internet until it got here, of course, but you'd think the writers would have realized that newspaper distribution to, say, Mars would be a terrible waste of jet fuel (not to mention that "daily" newspapers would arrive days or weeks late). And that they'd follow that thought to some other sort of news distribution, even if "internet" wasn't yet in their vocabulary.

...I have a (I suppose) specifically San Francisco how-times-have-changed thing to add here, that I haven't time for now ~ But, yeah,remember that late-Nineties book in well-known local/regional newspapers in, kind of, the markets at numbers 11-100, not the top 10 of the Top 100, the lower 90 percent, being bought from their family owners by big corporations? Just before Mr. Internet and Miss Craigslist cane along and kneecapped 'em!!!!!!!!!

The Baron said:

I love watching old sci-fi, and noticing what they totally didn't see coming.

One of my favorites in that regard, which I think I've mentioned here before, is the pilot to Lost in Space and its mission control room.

The gigantic, reel-to-reel computers are amusing, but I can forgive them for not anticipating small, printed-circuit beasts. At least they realized space flight was going to require computing machines.

And I can forgive that there were, like, three people in mission control who mostly stood around smoking and talking. In this case, they might have even realized it would take more personnel than that, but why budget for extras and more office furniture when you don't have to? Three guys on the payroll for a location we're never going to see again is plenty.

That mission control looked like a sound stage? Duh, it was, and again money is a factor. Forgiven.

But what always makes me laugh are that the three guys are smoking, and smoking a lot. When I was little, yes, you could smoke just about anywhere, even around computers and in airplanes and in hospitals with big metal tubes of oxygen nearby. But somewhere in, what, the '80s (?) smoking became banned just about everywhere. When I was in California 20 years ago, the only place you could smoke in the whole state was in designated outside areas, which were usually located near a dumpster. It was not subtle. Yet on Lost in Space, in the future, it was like watching my Dad and two of his Navy buddies when I was 6.

The other thing I found entertaining was all the analog clocks. I guess nobody anticipated digital ones, and I can't blame them for that. But again, it's like my childhood instead of my future. I can't remember the last time I saw an analog clock in a public place, but it was at least 30 years ago. Maybe 40. There were, like, six of them in mission control. And what for? To look future-y? What, you need to know the time in London when you're launching your space craft in Florida? Geez, check your watch and do the math.

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