Did you ever pass over a book because it just didn't look appealing, read that it's canceled sometime later, then find that it was written by someone you now really enjoy?

I was looking at an old house ad for the volume of Swamp Thing that centered on Tefe', Alec and Abbey's daughter. I passed it up at the time with hardly a second glance. I became disenchanted with Swamp Thing after Alan Moore left because Rick Veitch's work was nit appealing to me at all, so a series about his daughter seemed decidedly unappealing. Now I realize that it was written by Brian K. Vaughn, a writer that I follow avidly.

I'm sure I can find it in TPB now if I want, but it does make me wish I'd sampled it when it was new.

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I did get Hourman and had a bunch of letters printed, too!

But I regret not getting The Walking Dead. Who know?

Also The Lone Ranger when it was first revived.

Yeah I remember even mentioning seeing one of your letters in one of those Comic a Day threads.

Philip Portelli said:

I did get Hourman and had a bunch of letters printed, too!

But I regret not getting The Walking Dead. Who know?

Also The Lone Ranger when it was first revived.

As predicted, DC has gotten around to collecting the Brian K. Vaughan run:

Swamp Thing by Brian K. Vaughan Vol. 1

Release date: January 14, 2014 | Series: Swamp Thing
In this series from 2000, writer Brian K. Vaughan kicked off a new SWAMP THING series that starred Tefé Holland, daughter of Swamp Thing and Abigail Arcane. As a human/plant elemental hybrid, Tefé has incredible power--but as a hot-headed teenager, can she learn to control those powers and use them for good? Vaughan's sensitive stories send Tefé across the globe to play an unexpected role in remote regions threatened by ecological disasters.

Collects SWAMP THING (2000) #1-10 and a story from VERTIGO: WINTER'S EDGE #3.

There were 20 issues in the run, so it looks like Vol. 2 will complete the collection.

There was a prestige issue of Swamp Thing written and illustrated by Jon. J. Muth called Swamp Thing: Roots. It took place in Indiana along the Wabash River. I was in college at the time and couldn't really afford it back then, so I had to skip it until I got paid. When I went back, it was gone. I've never seen it anywhere since then.

I've never really read much Swamp Thing except for the Grant Morrison issues, but I wanted to read that one. I love Muth's artwork.

I re-read it recently, and you can read my take on it at http://mrvertigocomics.wordpress.com/2011/10/09/vertigo-miniseries-...

It's beautiful to look at, but the story was a bit underwhelming. Worth hunting bargain bins for if you love Muth's artwork.

Wandering Sensei: Emeritus said:

There was a prestige issue of Swamp Thing written and illustrated by Jon. J. Muth called Swamp Thing: Roots. It took place in Indiana along the Wabash River. I was in college at the time and couldn't really afford it back then, so I had to skip it until I got paid. When I went back, it was gone. I've never seen it anywhere since then.

I've never really read much Swamp Thing except for the Grant Morrison issues, but I wanted to read that one. I love Muth's artwork.

The concept and writing was good too, I thought.  Nice, fairly original use of the Swamp Thing mythos.  The problem, I think, was the 64 page Graphic Novel format, which is a bugbear of mine.  You pay that much money for something beautiful to look at, sit down for 'an experience', but then by the time all the new the characters and situations are introduced and the groundwork laid, well its time to wrap up and then its all over.  It's not quite the immersion that you go to comics for.

 

This applies really strongly to Elseworlds GNs for some reason.  Perhaps superhero-ish stories depend, more than we realise, on us knowing the basic background and concepts before the story begins, allowing the story to go straight into the meat of the thing.  Compare this GN to Alan Moore's 2-part Floronic Man story in his Swamp Thing, to take a random example.  Plenty of atmosphere and philosophy there too, and the Justice League to boot!  It's way less pages than Muth's book, but feels like a lot more.

 

I think I've said it before, Sensei, but you are in for a treat when you sit down to read Moore's Swamp Thing some day.  It really is superlative stuff.

John Moret said:

Cavaliere said:
"Chronos from DC. Man, that was good. I just wish that I (and a few thousand other people) had read it BEFORE it was canned."

Ditto for Tom Peyer's Hourman. I am surprised, given Rags Morales' popularity that they haven't collected this series in TPB.

 

Well, I've already praised Chronos to the heavens in my DC One Million posts, but next up will be a little appraisal of Hourman in the final installment, as it was a follow-up of sorts to DC 1m.

 

At least Hourman and Journey Into Mystery managed to reach the end of the arc their creators wanted to take them on. That's something. The way Chronos was only just beginning when it got the chop was sad. Likewise for Chase, another excellent series that hardly got started before the axe fell.

 

Studying that era of DC, it's kind of depressing that the books that tried to be artistic and genuinely engaging on a human level, generally didn't do as well as the more formulaic, wish fulfillment superhero stuff.

 

You can see that DC honed their product towards that fanboy market in the early 2000s, perhaps having learned the lessons of the limited appeal to their core audience of the likes of Chase and Chronos. JSA is much more geared towards the committed fanboy than JLA, for instance. You have to be interested in the continuity of its characters for its own sake to enjoy it.  (Although this probably contributed to JSA not being as widely popular as JLA, too.) Identity Crisis and Infinite Crisis were just around the corner.

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