Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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"Show 902"

That's too recent to have made it into the A.C. Episode Guide, so thanks for letting me know. I've long said the best MST3Ks are those of movies that at least try to be good, and The Phantom Planet tried hard. It started and ended as a "movie with a message" but devolved into cliche, as you said.

PLANET OUTLAWS ("1953"): I put the year in quotation marks because this "movie" is actually Buck Rogers serial footage edited together and inserted between a framing sequence. The framing sequence is made to look like a mock news program about UFOs and foreign invaders. Then the anchorman says something along the lines of, "Now let's take a look at how these problems may be dealt with in the future." 

I have watched a lot of movie serials in my life, but never Buck Rogers, for whatever reason. Perhaps the reason is because I more closely associate Buster Crabbe with Flash Gordon, of which I have all three serials. (Actually, though, I think Crabbe is better suited as Buck Rogers.) I always thought it would be kind of neat to edit serials together into one, long movie. It would be nice if DVD sets offered that option (as Doctor Who DVDs only sometimes do). Barring that, I would be happy if one could easily "skip" the end credits and the opening credits of the next chapter and the recap of the previous chapter to go directly from the cliffhanger to the resolution. That way, the viewer could continue watching as long as he wished without repetition, or stop whenever he wanted to and pick up the next time at the beginning of the next chapter.

But the editing of Planet Outlaws doesn't do that, exactly. Although it does eliminate the kind of endless recap which is a necessary evil of this type of storytelling, it also edits out a coherent plot (not that serials were exactly plot-driven in the first place). Avoid this one unless you just want something playing in the background while you sort comics or make dinner or something. 

I just saw "Dr. Strange and the Multiverse of Madness"; and, I was more than pleasantly surprised; I was impressed. Granted, I had read the less than great reviews, most of which portrayed this film as a horror film; but, putting them aside, I must admit that that I expected a cookie cutter superhero movie, featuring one of my absolute least favorite charactors. In short, I went to find the Easter eggs. But, what I found was a highly entertaining, and very well acted, movie. Elizabeth Olsen, as the Scarlet Witch, presents a stark , and convincing, contrast to the charactors other appearances (ok, I haven't seen Wandavision, so cut me some slack if I'm off here). Most of all, her portrayal here is fully believable, as is her charactors motivation. Of course, it has to be considered that, even in the comics, Scarlet Witch has not always been a model of mental health. Benedict Cumberbatch plays the same role he often plays, be it Sherlock Holmes, or as he does here, Stephen Strange; but, he plays it very well. Most impressive was that Strange doesn't simply wave his hands when casting spells; in combat, he strains, struggles, and often pays a price.

All this being said, and in spite of Olsen's early on, on unsettling, perfomance, the movie hits it's stride once it takes a truly dark turn, with the Scarlet Witch adapting an obsessed, ruthless approach to her cause, which prompts Strange to go darker. If you doubt the presence of any horror elements, you won't by this point in the film. (On a side note, if you've followed any of the "who's the most powerful MCU charactor" debates, you'll have the answer here)

Not to be overlooked, X Gomez (no disrespect. I'm sure I'd butcher her name) as the crux of Wanda's obsession, and focal point of the whole plot, plays her part well, but in a somewhat subdued manner. She leaves an unresolved plot point, that I for one look foward to seeing resolved, in some future project.

One a Tracy's FB friends, a "Cumberbitch", went to see Dr. Strange and raved about how good it was. Tracy suggested that  her friend might want to join her "The Old Order Changeth" group to which her friend replied, "Since I didn't realize this was a  Marvel superhero movie until just now, probably not." I... don't really understand how anyone can not know it's a Marvel superhero movies, but okay.

CONVOY (1978): This is another of my "memory lane" '70s movies I saw as a kid and haven't seen since. Many movies are associated with songs, but this is one of two from the era I can think of that is actually based on a song. CB radios were big with me and my friends, although none of us had one and none of us could drive. I think we all probably had CB "handles" but I can't remember what they were. My sister had a CB; her handle was "Goldilocks." One person she talked to was "Meatcutter" (a butcher, she said). My brother-in-law was an actual trucker for a time after Viet Nam, but I don't remember his handle. I spoke to my sister on the phone today; I should have asked her. Anyway...

I didn't remember much about this movie (other than it starred Kris Kristoferson, Ali MacGraw and Ernest Borgnine)... until I started to watch it, then it all came flooding back. It also starred Burt Young, Madge Sinclair and Franklyn Ajaye and was directed by Sam Peckinpah (his highest grossing film according to Wikipedia). Tracy even liked it!

I only ever used a CB radio once.  My handle was "Valeyard".

As noted over here, in the "Jackie Cooper's Celebrity Deaths" thread:

From the New York Daily News: "Bill Fries, Known as Country Singer C.W. McCall for 'Convoy,' Dies at 93".

You'd think, with my wife out of town, this would be a good time to catch up on a few '70s movies (which she doesn't particularly care for as a rule, anyway), but she casts them from her phone which she has with her. Then I remembered a few I have on DVD.

THE BAD NEWS BEARS (1976): I saw this one when I was 12 years old in the sixth grade. It came on TV a couple of years ago, but I stopped watching it as soon as I realized they had "cleaned up" all of the sixth grade language (the way 12-year-olds talk amongst themselves when their parents aren't around). Ironically, having enjoyed Paper Moon a short time ago, Tracy might have enjoyed this one. (I don't recall what she thought of it the first time around.) Paper Moon and the Bad News Bears are the only two Tatum O'Neal movies I ever saw. (I'm surprised I never saw Little Darlings because I had a big crush on Kristy McNichol at the time.) I saw Breaking Training and Go to Japan, but neither of those stick in my head as ones I really enjoyed.

(Hey, Jack Davis!)

I enjoyed the first Bad News Bears sequel, but it felt like more of a straight kids' movie (with swear words), and the absence of Walter Matthau and Tatum O'Neal means it was never going to be as good as the first film. I haven't re-watched it since I was a kid, however, and I doubt it holds up as the original (un-Bowdlerized, thank you) does. The Bad News Bears in Japan, however, is just awful. Even as a kid I remember thinking what a let-down it was, and that the boys were looking too old for little league.  And don't get me started on the 2005 Bad News Bears remake. Alcoholism notwithstanding, I would trust kids with Matthau's Buttermaker. But Billy Bob Thornton's....! He comes across as sleazy.

I never saw the short-lived TV series, but I note that both versions of Kelly Leak appear in Breaking Away, one of the great often-overlooked films of the late 1970s.

I did not see Little Darlings when it came out (I remember my sister talking about it), but caught it, years later. It's better than I expected (though not worth seeing again) and contains some content that would be handled very differently today. It came out in 1980, but it's very much a film of the late 70s.

Oh, Breaking Away... I saw that one. Haven't thought of it in years. 

Another movie suddenly popped into my head: Meatballs

I agree with everything you said about the BNB sequels. Haven't seen any of the more "recent" stuff (and don't really care to, even out of a sense of morbid curiosity). 

 Meatballs may be my favorite stupid movie from the 70s. Bonus: it was filmed in Ontario, and each of my sisters knew someone from the cast.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Another movie suddenly popped into my head: Meatballs

Jeff of Earth-J said:

THE BAD NEWS BEARS (1976): I saw this one when I was 12 years old in the sixth grade. It came on TV a couple of years ago, but I stopped watching it as soon as I realized they had "cleaned up" all of the sixth grade language (the way 12-year-olds talk amongst themselves when their parents aren't around). Ironically, having enjoyed Paper Moon a short time ago, Tracy might have enjoyed this one. (I don't recall what she thought of it the first time around.) Paper Moon and the Bad News Bears are the only two Tatum O'Neal movies I ever saw. (I'm surprised I never saw Little Darlings because I had a big crush on Kristy McNichol at the time.) I saw Breaking Training and Go to Japan, but neither of those stick in my head as ones I really enjoyed.

I remembered the name Jackie Earle Haley, who played motorcycle kid Kelly Leak. Many years later I was surprised to see him play Rorschach in Watchmen, along other unsympathetic roles in the movies..

The IMDB trivia tells me that you almost got to see Kristy McNichol in the lead. They told her she had the role and then dumped her for Tatum O'Neal.

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