Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

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At times, Captain felt more like a well done prequel than a better than good, but not quite great, stand alone film. Brie Larson delivers a Carol Danvers that I can only describe as confident without cool. She has the power and is not afraid to use it; but, she lacks the full knowledge and skill typically associated with a warrior. In short, she's not Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman. A good illustration of her character is seen in flashback scene that depicts a young Carol standing angry and defiant. I got the sense that the child may have grown older, but never fully became an adult. I got the impression that if at any point she asked "did I do that?" it would have been a sincere question. Also being portrayed younger is Sam Jackson's Nick Fury. Gone is the hard nosed no nonsense Fury that he will become. Present is a somewhat idealistic, trusting character, who has far to great an affinity for Goose the "cat". I found myself trying to rationalize this portrayal as Fury being under the "cat's" influence in some way.

There is a plot twist involving the Skrulls that is valid only for those who didn't pay attention to Guardians of the Galaxy or have not been introduced to the comic book story history. 

All in all, this was not a bad way to spend an afternoon. And, just to tie into JD's commentary, for me there were no politics involved (After School Special or otherwise). Although, if I were watching this film during the period in which it was set, I might have felt differently.


 
JD DeLuzio said:

Captain Marvel (2019), which I liked. I'd put it in the middle tier of Marvel superhero moves, above the first two Thors but below Black Panther, Winter Soldier, and the Avengers. but that's probably a discussion elsewhere at the site. Seeing it increased my eye-rolls at the in-advance controversy over the film's politics.  It's about as radical as an after-school special.

Blackkklansman (2018): good, though no more strictly faithful to the facts than most Hollywood films based on a true story.

The Hate U Give (2018): a strong adaptation of the novel. The family/friends sequences, in many ways, work better than the large-scale public drama, and the film necessarily makes a number of changes, including the ending. Nevertheless, it respects its source material, and is worth seeing,

Monster Club (1981): an unimpressive cult horror anthology film featuring Vincent Price and John Carradine. Three stories, interrupted by the framing device and some generally bad pop music. The final third is the best, and the "stripper" sequence is at least creative.

Us.

I encourage people to see this, at least, if they're even remotely fans of the horror genre.

You know what was creepier than seeing this movie, though?

Leaving this movie, which involves doppelgängers, and immediately walking past a pair of smiling twin little girls.

Ok. In spite of having received a good scolding from my college student comic book purist, eldest daughter, I watched Teen Titans Go to the Movies (quote my eldest "That is not Teen Titans! Why do you want to watch that garbage!!!???!!!).

I thought it was funny. I don't like that fact; but, I did. Sorry Abby. As a fellow comic book purist, I know I've let you down. (but, I'm sure you'll get over it.) LOL. 

JohnD said:

Ok. In spite of having received a good scolding from my college student comic book purist, eldest daughter, I watched Teen Titans Go to the Movies (quote my eldest "That is not Teen Titans! Why do you want to watch that garbage!!!???!!!).

I thought it was funny. I don't like that fact; but, I did. Sorry Abby. As a fellow comic book purist, I know I've let you down. (but, I'm sure you'll get over it.) LOL. 

A long time ago, I decided the movies and TV shows are just alternate universe versions of the comics. So of course they aren't exactly to canon. 

And my wife and I had a great time at Teen Titans Go! I almost wanted to watch it a second time, just to catch more of the Easter eggs. This from a guy who started reading Teen Titans in the Silver Age.

JohnD said:

Ok. In spite of having received a good scolding from my college student comic book purist, eldest daughter, I watched Teen Titans Go to the Movies (quote my eldest "That is not Teen Titans! Why do you want to watch that garbage!!!???!!!).

I thought it was funny. I don't like that fact; but, I did. Sorry Abby. As a fellow comic book purist, I know I've let you down. (but, I'm sure you'll get over it.) LOL. 

I haven't seen the movie, and I didn't really ever watch the show. But I love the fact that it was made for kids, and not the middle-aged men of the original fandom. I remember when the cartoon first came out, and everyone was crying in their beer, but it was a runaway hit among the target audience.

A whole new generation was introduced to Cyborg, Starfire, Beast Boy, and Raven, assuming they already knew who Robin was.

CAPTAIN MARVEL: Surprisingly good for a superhero movie. I actually liked it. Set in 1995, this is the “first” Marvel movie AFAIAC.

Wasn't at least part of the Captain America movie set during World War Two?

Jeff of Earth-J said:

CAPTAIN MARVEL: Surprisingly good for a superhero movie. I actually liked it. Set in 1995, this is the “first” Marvel movie AFAIAC.

Yes, I believe it was, but I didn't like that one so it doesn't count. ;)

Flawlessly logical.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Yes, I believe it was, but I didn't like that one so it doesn't count. ;)

ANIMAL CRACKERS: Inspired by the recently released graphic novel of Salvador Dali’s Marx Brothers movie script Giraffes on Horseback Salad, last night I watched Animal Crackers, my favorite of the early films. About halfway through, Tracy turned to me and said, “Jeff, this really isn’t all that funny.” I told her people say the same about Shakespeare’s comedies and she laughed. I was shocked. She came around to the Three Stooges. Maybe she’ll warm to the Brothers Marx as well. If I had a time machine, I’d go back to see them perform it on Broadway.

I am a huge Marx Brothers fan but when I watched Animal Crackers again last year it didn't seem as funny as I remembered. I've found that non-fans have a better reaction to the Marx MGM films, like Night At The Opera, since those have more plot than the early films that were adapted from the Brothers Broadway shows.

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