Saw a Takashi Miike picture called The Great Yokai War. "Yokai" is a Japanese term for monsters from folklore, as opposed to the more familiar kaiju. It's a kids' picture, about a young boy from Tokyo sent out to live in the countryside with his older sister and his intermittently senile grandfather. When a vengeful spirit appears, the boy gets caught up in a war between warring groups of yokai and must find his courage to become the "Kirin Rider", the hero who will set everything to rights. It's not a bad picture - nothing deep, but an amusing story. Some of the yokai are really trippy, Japanese folklore can get pretty "out there", apparently.

Views: 58039

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The problem is that when you're doing a 26 episode TV series, you have room to tell several different kinds of stories. When you're do9ng a theatrical movie, you end up doing the one story that the studio thinks will sell.

"...the first online discussion I stumbled upon concerning its forthcoming sequel centered on the weighty SF question of what 'villain' should appear in the next Star Trek movie."

"Can anyone remember when we used to be explorers?" - Jean-Luc Picard - Insurrection

Jeff of Earth-J said:

A VIEW TO A KILL: Although this is the last Roger Moore Bond film, it sets the expectations for the rest of the decade. After that, there was a whole lot of hand-wringing in certain circles because all of the Fleming titles had been used up. Honestly, even some of the later Connery films had little to do with the books after which they were named, so I didn't see what the big deal was. that ship had sailed a long time ago, and the movies might well have been titled anything that evokes the general mood of a Bond film (as, indeed, happened). 

Case in point: A View to a Kill. The movie had nothing to do with the collection of short stories upon which it was based after which it was named. The villain is Max Zorin (Christopher Walkin), the "Bond Girl" is Stacy Sutton (Tanya Roberts) and Grace Jones pulls double duty as both Zorin's chief enforcer as well as the femme fatale. None of those characters are from any of the books. Like Moonraker, though, the plot (about a shortage of microchips Zorin engineered) is somewhat prescient. 

I never understood why anyone would complain, or even care, that the James Bond movies didn't exactly follow the James Bond novels.

"I never understood why anyone would complain, or even care, that the James Bond movies didn't exactly follow the James Bond novels."

Because the best of the movies were those that were closest to the novels. Once they deviated from the source material, the movies became increasingly campy. That's why people complain. As to why they care, those who haven't read the novels obviously don't.

"The problem is that when you're doing a 26 episode TV series, you have room to tell several different kinds of stories. When you're doing a theatrical movie, you end up doing the one story that the studio thinks will sell."

That is a good point. The metatextual Picard quote above indicates that the problem predated the Abramsverse movies. In point of fact (in-universe), Picard served as captain of the Enterprise-E for just as long as he did the D, but those voyages have gone unrecorded in canon except for the movies, just as Kirk's (apocryphal) second five-year mission (and possibly his third) which may or may not have happened in the 14-year (in-story) gap between Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan have gone (largely) unrecorded in canon. That's why I think the battle between "Trekies"and "Warries" is a false comparison, in that Star Trek is primarily a series of TV shows and Star Wars is primarily a series of movies. 

STAR TREK BEYOND: Here's what I said in 2016:

Jeff of Earth-J said:

These films set in the rebooted universe are little more than eye candy, but y’know what? I don’t mind that so much anymore. They are what they are.

Having said that (twice now), I would not be disappointed if this marked the end of the Star Trek franchise on the big screen. 

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"I never understood why anyone would complain, or even care, that the James Bond movies didn't exactly follow the James Bond novels."

Because the best of the movies were those that were closest to the novels. Once they deviated from the source material, the movies became increasingly campy. That's why people complain.

It doesn't follow to my mind that the campier movies in the series were such because they didn't hew to the books; that's the fault of the producers and/or directors, who could have made any story campy. Case in point: the David Niven Casino Royale.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

As to why they care, those who haven't read the novels obviously don't.

Count me in that number.

IIRC, Star Trek movies were stopped because the studio wanted to make them for less and the cast wanted to be paid more. 

Quite frankly, Star Trek just wasn't pulling in Marvel movie money.

"Case in point: the David Niven Casino Royale."

Yes, case in point. That version of Casino Royale, apart from the title and the villain's name, had nothing to do with the plot of the book (not that I hold Cubby Broccoli blameless for the increasingly campy tone of the movies). The Danial Craig version, however, while updated some 50 years, did follow the plot of the book. I guess my point is that a faithful adaptation of the books won't be campy because the books themselves weren't campy.

"Count me in that number."

I already have.

Speaking of James Bond (and Star Trek), the last two Star Trek movies do make some nod toward exploration with their Bond-like pre-opening credits teaser sequences.

"Quite frankly, Star Trek just wasn't pulling in Marvel movie money."

An apt comparison. Why pay to see a movie that blatantly caters to a style they can have better in a superhero genre movie? 

I just watched The Uninvited (1944) on a rental DVD from the Criterion Collection, so it should be fairly easy to see if my comments interest you. In the comments on IMDB a few remarkable things are pointed out.

Up until then, all movies about ghosts had been either humorous or intent on debunking the idea of them. This movie starts out mild and ends up wild.  

This was the first time that special effects were used to portray a ghost (and they're good).

Both Martin Scorsese and Guillermo del Toro rank this movie as one of their favorite scary movies.

An American brother and sister (Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey) are interested in a huge, beautiful house in Cornwall. They wind up asking the owner (Donald Crisp, who seems to have been in every movie back then) about renting the house and are surprised that it can be bought for a bargain price. The owner is overprotective of his granddaughter, who lost both of her parents. The granddaughter is 20 and lost her mother when she was 3. She worships the mother she doesn't actually remember. Other women, living and dead, also play significant parts in the story. A doctor played by Alan Napier (also in a lot of movies plus Batman) has a major part.

Of course, the house is haunted. The ghost seems to want the granddaughter (who Ray Milland’s character is falling in love with) to die, making at least two serious attempts on her life.

Here is the IMDB listing, which includes the trailer.

I've also been watching a number of Hammer Studio films. The best one so far is Hammer's only werewolf picture, Curse of the Werewolf (1961), which stars Oliver Reed.* The movie still has a supernatural werewolf, but reinvents most of the werewolf lore. Very interesting.

*I instantly became a fan of Oliver Reed when he played the murderous thug Bill Sykes in the movie Oliver! (1968).

I instantly became a fan of Oliver Reed when he played the swashbuckling adventurer Athos in The Three Musketeers (1973). 

I don't think I've ever been disappointed in a movie from the Criterion Collection. 

KING OF THE ZOMBIES (1941): Light-hearted but racist. The main character (I suppose), Jefferson Jackson, is a racial stereotype. He does, however, get all the best lines (the only good lines, in fact). 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Groups

Latest Activity

Dave Elyea replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"Since the story specified the Tokyo Olympics (I don't recall that it actually said 1964 or if…"
2 minutes ago
Luis Olavo de Moura Dantas replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"Marvel's Comet Man's origin is strongly tied to the year 1986, because that is when…"
25 minutes ago
Luis Olavo de Moura Dantas replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"Roy Thomas wrote Secret Origins #5, which establishes that Lee Travis' decision to become the…"
31 minutes ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"Hmm... even though that story is not tied to a specific date, it's historic enough to be…"
1 hour ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Captain Comics's discussion Comics Guide: Sept. 26-Oct. 2, 2022
"Note to wrestling comics fans: this week's Florida Man #3 (see above) is structured around a…"
1 hour ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion She-Hulk
"It was not my intention to post about each issue individually, although I just might anyway. My…"
1 hour ago
Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) replied to Captain Comics's discussion Comics Guide: Sept. 26-Oct. 2, 2022
"Cap said: Totally agree, Cap! I really enjoy the wide selection we have now, since my tastes have…"
1 hour ago
Luis Olavo de Moura Dantas replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"Superman Family #182 (April 1977) has a Supergirl story tied to Viking 1 making its way to…"
1 hour ago
Jeff of Earth-J replied to Jeff of Earth-J's discussion Fixed Points in Time
"I would classify that as "fuzzy" because there's no historical event to…"
1 hour ago
Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) replied to Wandering Sensei: Moderator Man's discussion What Comic Books Have You Read Today?
"Batman: Dear Detective: This is the Lee Bremejo joint in which he creates a story based on his…"
1 hour ago
Travis Herrick (Modular Mod) replied to Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod)'s discussion DC's Digital Backlist
"Rob said It does make me wonder how big that team is that takes care of this process. I say this as…"
1 hour ago
Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod) replied to Rob Staeger (Grodd Mod)'s discussion DC's Digital Backlist
"And one more thing... maybe the most off-model Darkseid I've ever seen:"
2 hours ago

© 2022   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service