The Original "The Man from UNCLE Movies – Now on Digital HD!

As filmgoers go gaga over Guy Ritchie’s stylish and swinging origin story for "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." with Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment offers a chance to grove to the original U.N.C.L.E. team with Robert Vaughn and David McCallum as it’s neer been seen – in eye popping, crystal clear 1080p Digital HD!

Crafted from the original series' frequent two-parters, these are more than mere patch-jobs, employing extra footage shot while filming the original episodes to expand the stories and including elements that would be deemed too racy or violent for American primetime television.

Notable guest stars in these films include Academy Award winner Jack Palance and Joan Crawford, Emmy Award winners Telly Savalas, Maurice Evans & Bradford Dillman, Oscar nominees Eleanor Parker, Rip Torn and Joan Blondell, as well as Vera Miles, Herbert Lom, Jill Ireland, Carol Lynley, Kim Darby, Terry-Thomas, Dorothy Provine, "Star Trek" star James Doohan and "James Bond" luminaries Curt Jurgens and Luciana Paluzzi. The late Yvonne Craig appears in two of the films.

These entertaining films are now available for download in Digital HD from Amazon and iTunes.

Here's the list of the eight "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." features -- complete with one-line synopses, guest stars, a link to a trailer and a link to the actual film. And attached are a few of the film's one-sheet posters (all of the posters are available upon request).

To Trap a Spy (1965)

Expanded version of the U.N.C.L.E. pilot (Napoleon Solo aka The Vulcan Affair), including the famous "too hot for TV" scenes shot with future Bond girl Luciana Paluzzi.  

Film: http://bit.ly/SPYTRAPHD   

 

The Spy With My Face (1965)

Expanded version of The Double Affair, in which a fake Napoleon Solo wreaks havoc on an U.N.C.L.E. secret mission.

Film: http://bit.ly/SPYFACE

 

One Spy Too Many (1966)

Expansion of season two's Alexander the Greater Affair, in which an ambitious industrialist (Rip Torn) sets out to conquer the world. With Yvonne (Batgirl) Craig. 

Film: http://bit.ly/TOOSPYHD

 

The Spy in the Green Hat (1966)

The Concrete Overcoat Affair gets the feature treatment, in which Thrush agent Louis Strago (Jack Palance) attempts to unleash climate change upon the world.

Film: http://bit.ly/SPYGREENHD

 

One of Our Spies is Missing (1967)

Vera Miles, Yvonne Craig and James Doohan guest as Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin head to London and Paris to foil a plot hatched by the nefarious fashion industry.

Film: http://bit.ly/MISSSPYHD 

 

The Karate Killers (1967)

The Five Daughters Affair feature version, with heavyweight heavies Telly Savalas and Herbert Lom providing the menace while Joan Crawford, Jill Ireland and Kim Darby make up the distaff side.

Film: http://bit.ly/KARATEKILL 

 

The Helicopter Spies (1968)

Carol Lynley and Bradford Dillman lend their talent to the film version of The Prince of Darkness Affair.

Film: http://bit.ly/HELISPIES

 

How to Steal the World (1968)

Leslie Nielsen joins Robert Vaughn and David McCallum for the film version of the U.N.C.L.E. series closer, The Seven Wonders of the World Affair.

Film: http://bit.ly/WORLDSTEAL

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Including the ones you cited, my count is ten:

The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.

Mission: Impossible

Get Smart

I Spy

The Wild, Wild West

The Avengers (British import, aired in U.S.)

Secret Agent (ditto; originally aired in U.K. as Danger Man)

Blue Light

The Man Who Never Was

Wikipedia also categorises the 1966 offering Jericho, a World-War-II-based series, as an espionage programme.  I remember watching it a couple of times, and, unlike some other WWII-era series which were clearly spy shows, I would classify Jericho as more of a war-adventure series.  But, if one goes by Wikipedia, then that brings the tally to eleven, which is, indeed, "nearly a dozen".

Thanks, Commander. I'd not heard of Blue Light, The Man Who Never Was, and Jericho.

The Wackiest Ship in the Army arguably should count: not having seen it, I had it mixed up with another show. Arguably Hogan's Heroes could too. But when one speaks of spy shows one normally means stories where spies conduct an undeclared secret war.

Saw the new feature film yesterday and was pleasantly surprised. As a kid I was a fan of the TV show,  but I am wary of modern takes on my old favorites, however my wife and I both found it very entertaining. Setting the story in the early '60's rather than modern day was a smart move. The Cold War tension between an American agent and his Russian counterpart is an essential part of this U.N.C.L.E. origin story.  The creative team did a great job keeping the music, fashions and technology period correct. The film overall had a good mix of action and humor and Cavill and Hammer have a nice rapport - worth checking out.

Modern-takes-on-old-favourites-wise, when I saw the Steve Carell Get Smart I thought it as close to the original show as a modern movie might get. I was grateful it wasn't a complete disaster. I no longer see it that way, as I've seen OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies, which is like a perfect Get Smart movie. The sequel, OSS 117: Lost in Rio, didn't work for me.

Lots of UNCLE info available here -

UNCLE fan site

...I recall reading that the Gene Barry vehicle BURKE'S LAW not only made his character , Amos Burke , a secret agent rather than an everyday policeman in its last season (Which was-?) , but retitled the show AMOS BURKE , SECRET AGENT , so-?

Commander Benson said:

Including the ones you cited, my count is ten:

The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.

Mission: Impossible

Get Smart

I Spy

The Wild, Wild West

The Avengers (British import, aired in U.S.)

Secret Agent (ditto; originally aired in U.K. as Danger Man)

Blue Light

The Man Who Never Was

Wikipedia also categorises the 1966 offering Jericho, a World-War-II-based series, as an espionage programme.  I remember watching it a couple of times, and, unlike some other WWII-era series which were clearly spy shows, I would classify Jericho as more of a war-adventure series.  But, if one goes by Wikipedia, then that brings the tally to eleven, which is, indeed, "nearly a dozen".


doc photo said:

The Cold War tension between an American agent and his Russian counterpart is an essential part of this U.N.C.L.E. origin story. 

Except that making it the U.N.C.L.E. origin story violates what was established in the series---that U.N.C.L.E. existed well before the early 1960's.  The fourth-season episode, "The Survival School Affair", takes place on U.N.C.L.E.'s island-based training facility, and it is stated that Napoleon Solo completed his training there in 1954, and Illya Kuryakin, in 1956.

Another episode, "The Odd Man Affair" from the first season, includes even more details, from an U.N.C.L.E. operative retiring on age, about the long existence of the organisation.  Chief among these is the fact that U.N.C.L.E. wasn't created by the Cold War; it was created in recognition that there were threats to mankind that rose above Cold War tensions, and an international force was required to deal with those threats.

Other folks---probably most---are different, but I cannot watch a film not just based on, but drawing its working details from a television series, and getting those details wrong.  It would be like doing a movie about the television series Mission: Impossible and making Jim Phelps a traitor or something.


Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...I recall reading that the Gene Barry vehicle BURKE'S LAW not only made his character , Amos Burke , a secret agent rather than an everyday policeman in its last season (Which was-?) , but retitled the show AMOS BURKE , SECRET AGENT , so-?

Good catch!  I completely forgot about the format change to Burke's Law.  Yep, it changed to Amos Burke, Secret Agent (and lost all of its charm) in the 1965-6 season.  So it would count.  That would bring the total to an even dozen.

Thanks.

Commander Benson said:

Other folks---probably most---are different, but I cannot watch a film not just based on, but drawing its working details from a television series, and getting those details wrong.

Oh come on Commander, give this one a chance. I went into the theater prepared to be disappointed but thoroughly enjoyed the film. In fact, my wife and I are hoping it does well enough to spawn a sequel. No, it does not match up exactly with what we saw in the original series but it captures the spirit so well. Consider it U.N.C.L.E. of Earth Two.

...I don't think I've ever seen the original BL/ABSA , I saw a bit of the 90s revival of the series , in which his son had joined him as a policeman , of course carrying most of the violent action/chases in the series - The gimmick of the series was that Burke was personally rich , driving to work in an extremely upscale car , etcetera ~ I recall that the 90s series simply flat-out said that he had  " married well " ~ had married a rich woman (I guess deceased by the time of the 90s series .) although I don't know if the 60s series...???

  I suppose to comparison to James Bond's many upscale places- of assignment and clothing/manner may have made the BL producers decide to propel Burke from everyday cop to spy ~ where the concept , now , would not seem so " unusual " , it seems to me !

  Are all versions of the Barry Burke series on DVD ?
 
Commander Benson said:


Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...I recall reading that the Gene Barry vehicle BURKE'S LAW not only made his character , Amos Burke , a secret agent rather than an everyday policeman in its last season (Which was-?) , but retitled the show AMOS BURKE , SECRET AGENT , so-?

Good catch!  I completely forgot about the format change to Burke's Law.  Yep, it changed to Amos Burke, Secret Agent (and lost all of its charm) in the 1965-6 season.  So it would count.  That would bring the total to an even dozen.

Thanks.

...Have you followed the link to the " The Final Affair " posting , Cmdr. ?

  I need to re-read the relevant chapter again before I discuss it here so I don't get the details wrong , but TFA presents an " origin " for Napoleon Solo ~ that , um , might be seen as a pretty severe example of a EYKIW revelation about a character's background !


doc photo said:

Oh come on Commander, give this one a chance.

It would be a waste of my money. It would be tough enough for me to get past Robert Vaughn and David McCallum not portraying Solo and Kuryakin.  But then to ask me to ignore that the folks who produced the film got their facts about U.N.C.L.E.'s background wrong?  Or worse, that they tossed the facts aside so they could cater to their Neat Idea.  (Not to mention that, to their minds, their version of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.  is superior to the one from those "ancient times".)

No, if producers are making a film derived from a television series that I liked, then they better get all the details correct.  I don't want their modern, it's-the-same-thing-but-better! sensibilities inserted.

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