Just bringing this discussion over to ning...

What books are you reading right now that don't have a narrative driven by images as well as words?

Views: 12196

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'm reading Eastern Stars about the development of baseball in the Dominican town of San Pedro de Macoris.  The town has sent over 80 players to Major League Baseball.  The book is fairly interesting, although it spends almost as much time on music, food and other cultural aspects as on baseball. 

Unfortunately, the player bios in the back have consistent and egregious errors.  Either the author, the editor or the publisher doesn't know the difference between various baseball awards, or else they're handing out MVP awards willy-nilly.  They credit Pedro Guerrero with the 1981 National League MVP.  Uh, that was actually Mike Schmidt.  Guerrero won the World Series MVP that year, not the league award.  They credit Julio Franco with the 1990 American League MVP.  Uh, that was actually Rickey Henderson.  Franco won the All-Star Game MVP that season.  They credit Juan Samuel with 2 MVPs, Luis Castillo with 1 and shortstop Tony Fernandez with 4 straight.  That's when I knew something was goofy.  Fernandez didn't win 1 award, let alone a historic 4 in a row.  Rather, each of those players received votes for the MVP but finished well back of the winner.  Juan Samuel received votes in '84 and '87 but finished 21st and 13th in those years.  Luis Castillo finished 21st in 2003.  And Tony Fernandez received votes in four straight seasons from '86 to '89 but never finished better than 8th.  There really shouldn't be room for those kinds of factual errors in a book that is otherwise so carefully researched.

Good luck! 

If you're running out of time, don't be afraid to skip a few of the historical chapters.  I really didn't need a 30 page explanation of the Paris sewer system in order to understand the 5 page scene in which one character escapes another by running into the sewers. 

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

I'm finishing Mockingjay and will start Les Miserables soon...will try to finish it before the film in December.  Wish me luck.

Cool.  I tried to read it a couple of years back.  I enjoyed it when I was reading it, especially the baseball scenes, but I barely felt motivated to pick it up again after I set it down.  I finally ran out of renewals at the library and had to bring it back half-finished. 

Wandering Sensei said:

The Brothers K by David James Duncan. Just started it.

Actually, 30 pages on a large city's sewer system sounds pretty interesting.  This new translation by Julie Rose moves along pretty nicely.
 
Chris Fluit said:

Good luck! 

If you're running out of time, don't be afraid to skip a few of the historical chapters.  I really didn't need a 30 page explanation of the Paris sewer system in order to understand the 5 page scene in which one character escapes another by running into the sewers. 

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

I'm finishing Mockingjay and will start Les Miserables soon...will try to finish it before the film in December.  Wish me luck.

Hey, and don't tell me what to read or not read in the book.  What is this, Duran Duran?


 
Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

Actually, 30 pages on a large city's sewer system sounds pretty interesting.  This new translation by Julie Rose moves along pretty nicely.
 
Chris Fluit said:

Good luck! 

If you're running out of time, don't be afraid to skip a few of the historical chapters.  I really didn't need a 30 page explanation of the Paris sewer system in order to understand the 5 page scene in which one character escapes another by running into the sewers. 

Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

I'm finishing Mockingjay and will start Les Miserables soon...will try to finish it before the film in December.  Wish me luck.

Ha!  Honestly, I read every page including the history of the sewer system.  I was gently advising that there are some chapters you can skip if you're in a rush.  Like Charles Dickens, I suspect that Victor Hugo was paid by the word.



Doc Beechler (mod-MD) said:

Hey, and don't tell me what to read or not read in the book.  What is this, Duran Duran?

Chris Fluit said:

Unfortunately, the player bios in the back have consistent and egregious errors.  Either the author, the editor or the publisher doesn't know the difference between various baseball awards, or else they're handing out MVP awards willy-nilly.  They credit Pedro Guerrero with the 1981 National League MVP.  Uh, that was actually Mike Schmidt.  Guerrero won the World Series MVP that year, not the league award.  They credit Julio Franco with the 1990 American League MVP.  Uh, that was actually Rickey Henderson.  Franco won the All-Star Game MVP that season.  They credit Juan Samuel with 2 MVPs, Luis Castillo with 1 and shortstop Tony Fernandez with 4 straight.  That's when I knew something was goofy.  Fernandez didn't win 1 award, let alone a historic 4 in a row.  Rather, each of those players received votes for the MVP but finished well back of the winner.  Juan Samuel received votes in '84 and '87 but finished 21st and 13th in those years.  Luis Castillo finished 21st in 2003.  And Tony Fernandez received votes in four straight seasons from '86 to '89 but never finished better than 8th.  There really shouldn't be room for those kinds of factual errors in a book that is otherwise so carefully researched.

Sounds like somebody needed to head over to baseball-reference.com. Woof, that is pretty bad.

Since last posting I've finished The Secret People by John Benyon (=John Wyndham), Flash Gordon 3: The Space Circus by Con Steffanson (=Ron Goulart), The History of the Science Fiction Magazine Part One edited by Michael Ashley, The Dimensioneers by Doris Piserchia, The Crystal Stopper by Maurice Leblanc, and Death Likes It Hot by Edgar Box.

 

The Dimensioneers is about a teenage girl who can ride a lion-like animal between dimensions. It reminded me of Diana Wynne Jones's books. The Crystal Stopper is from Leblanc's Arsene Lupin series. This one was published after 813 (which is a turning-point in the series for Lupin), but set before the events of that novel. I partly read it via Project Gutenberg, and partly listened to it via librivox.org. Death Likes It Hot is a brisk mid-50s murder mystery with some humour and sexual content.

 

The Secret People was Benyon/Wyndham's first novel, first published in 1935 but set in 1964. In its story the French authorities are in the process of creating an inland sea in North Africa. (This might remind the Baron of Jules Verne's Invasion of the Sea.) The hero and heroine are travelling over the sea in a rocket plane when it malfunctions and crashes into the sea. Eventually it falls through into a system of underground caverns where the hero and heroine find a primitive underground people whose caves are threatened by the sea, but who won't allow them to return to the surface. There's an interesting bit where the characters flip a coin and it has Elizabeth's head on it. When the book first appeared she was in line for the throne but it wasn't certain she'd inherit it because her uncle, Edward VIII to be, had not yet married. In the event he abdicated to marry Mrs Simpson.

 

The History of the Science Fiction Magazine Part One is an anthology with an introduction describing the early history of the SF magazine. Its contents are listed at the ISFDB. Of the stories it contains I think I most liked "One Prehistoric Night" by Philip Barshofsky and "The Island of Unreason" by Edmond Hamilton.

Yeah, it really diminished my estimation of the book.  Those are relatively easy facts to look up and correct.  It took me 2 minutes to check out baseball-reference myself for the right answers (no, I didn't have all of those facts memorized but I knew that what I was reading was wrong).  For the record, they also credited Jose Valverde with back-to-back MVPs in '07 and '08 when he finished 14th and 24th in the voting.  Oh, and they referred to the NFL as the National Football Association instead of League. 

Travis Herrick said:


Sounds like somebody needed to head over to baseball-reference.com. Woof, that is pretty bad.

"The Wounded and the Slain" by David Goodis. I'm 70 pages or so into it. and I have yet to find a character to either root for or root against. The setting is the most interesting thing so far: Jamaica.

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen. I'm about a third of the way through it now.

...In the  " Famed Classics ' You've Never Really Read Before " department , I started Theodore Dreiser's AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY - again - some years after having a 60sish mass market paperback edition with an intro by Alfred Kazin and getting maybe 1/6?? into it before losing the copy I found another copy of this at a library salke and read the intro and three chapters thus yet...

  A few days back I had a secondary HBO channel ( Signature?? ) for a coupla days , that's when I saw that Clifton Webb movie I posted about , and I half-saw a WWII-era " Gay Nineties " Fox musical , MY GAL SAL with Victor Mature and Rita Hayworth...a biography of Dreiser's pop songwriter brother Paul !!!!!!!!!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service