Back when DS9 and Voyager were on the air simultaneously, I remember reading an article in TV Guide which postulated that, in the future, Deep Space Nine would be remembered as the best of the (then) four Star Trek television series. The writer made a compelling argument for his case. I don’t remember his specific reasons, but I can tell you this: I have seen every episode of DS9 once, and once only… with two exceptions: I have seen “Blood Oath” (with the three TOS Klingons) and “Trials & Tribble-ations” multiple times each. Because I am less familiar with DS9 than I am TNG, I will probably spend a bit more time summarizing the episodes than I did with TNG, starting with…

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EMISSARY:

We have to go “back in the past,” twice, for the opener: first, because the first season of DS9 is concurrent with the sixth season of TNG; and second because the antecedent action flashes back to “The Best of Both Worlds.” Despite have seen it only once before, I remembered “Emissary” pretty well, and what I didn’t remember came back to me as I was watching.

Thoughts about select members of the cast:

COMMANDER BENJAMIN SISKO: I remembered that he lost his wife at the Battle of Wolf 359 and that he bore a grudge against Captain “Locutus” Picard, but I had forgotten that the two came face to face twice in this episode. In their first scene together, Sisko can barely withhold his contempt. As with Picard, it took me a few seasons to warm up to Sisko, but I must admit I really enjoyed Avery Brooks’ performance this time ‘round, especially that I now know he’s kind of a kook in real life (in the best way possible), which I didn’t know then.

DR. JULIAN BASHIR: I found this character annoying in 1993 and I find him even more annoying now, He reminds me of Jack Tripper. I wonder if the producers had his backstory in mind this early on…?

JADZIA DAX: In 1993 I thought Terry Farrell shouldn’t get too comfortable in her role. I predicted that, as a Trill, she would be replaced during a “sweeps week” and/or when the ratings started to flag. I gave her three years, tops.

THE PROPHETS/THE WORMHOLE: Sisko’s encounter with the Prophets reminded me of Vonnegut’s Tralfamadorians (as did TNG’s “All Good Things”). We to watched “Slaughterhouse Five” on August 23; it was Tracy’s first time.

Because is had seven years of TNG as a lead-in, DS9 was able t hit the ground running with not lengthy set-up of the socio-political situation. Good episode. I wanted to like DS9 more than I did initially, but there was something about it that was “not quite Trek” to me at the time. This was before shows such as Discovery. I had no idea how “un-Trek” a show could be.

NOTE TO SELF: the next time I decide I’m in the mood to watch DS9, I should watch “The Host” (The Trill), “The Wounded” (Cardassians) and “Ensign Ro” (Bajorans) as a lead-in.

I always liked DS9, I don't have all the episodes, but I'll be following this conversation with interest.  It took me a while to warm to Sisko, as well.

Despite my intention to spend more time on these episodes of DS9 than I did on TNG, I started watching them before I went on vacation. I’m already halfway through the first season watching them and I’d like to get caught up by COB today, so I may rush through these first few. Besides, despite having seen these episodes only once each (and that some 25 years ago), I find myself remembering them better than I thought I would. Here’s a few more thoughts on some of the characters…

DR. BASHIR: Forget Jack Tripper. His behavior towards Dax borders on sexual harassment in the workplace. It’s difficult to believe this behavior in the 20th century, much less the 24th. In the era of the “Me, Too” movement it is particularly jarring.

ODO: Prior to DS9, René Auberjonois was probably best known for playing Dago Red in M*A*S*H, but you can’t say “dago” no more because the wops don’t like it. (Sorry! I’ve been watching a lot of All in the Family lately, and that’s a direct quote from Archie Bunker.)

PAST PROLOGUE:

A Bajoran terrorist of Kira’s acquaintance arrives at the station, as to the Klingon Duras sisters, Lursa and B’Etor. The Bajoran’s true motive is to seal the wormhole, thus eliminating the need for a Federation presence, and the Duras sisters plan to turn him over to the Cardassians. Meanwhile, Bashir meets the spy Garak, the only Cardassian still left on the station. A good job would be done keeping Garak in the grey throughout the series.

An unremarkable episode.

A MAN ALONE:

An old nemesis of Odo’s is murdered, and Odo is the prime suspect. (It’s a frame-up, of course… “CSI:DS9.”) Jake and Nog become friends. Keiko starts up a school. We learn that Odo has to return to his natural liquid form every 18 hours. Generally, when I’m re-watching a show that takes a while to set up the status quo, I’m impatient for it to get going. But this time I’m really enjoying these early days.

BABEL:

O’Brien inadvertently triggers a device which releases a virus which causes an advanced form of aphasia. The disease soon spreads to the entire station. To make matters worse, the virus (a Bajoran secret weapon intended for use against the Cardassians) is soon discovered to be lethal. The aphasia results in some humorous exchanges as the crew try to communicate, but otherwise another unremarkable episode.

Actually, Auberjonois was probably better known for playing the governor's chief of staff on Benson.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Despite my intention to spend more time on these episodes of DS9 than I did on TNG, I started watching them before I went on vacation. I’m already halfway through the first season watching them and I’d like to get caught up by COB today, so I may rush through these first few. Besides, despite having seen these episodes only once each (and that some 25 years ago), I find myself remembering them better than I thought I would. Here’s a few more thoughts on some of the characters…

DR. BASHIR: Forget Jack Tripper. His behavior towards Dax borders on sexual harassment in the workplace. It’s difficult to believe this behavior in the 20th century, much less the 24th. In the era of the “Me, Too” movement it is particularly jarring.

ODO: Prior to DS9, René Auberjonois was probably best known for playing Dago Red in M*A*S*H, but you can’t say “dago” no more because the wops don’t like it. (Sorry! I’ve been watching a lot of All in the Family lately, and that’s a direct quote from Archie Bunker.)

CAPTIVE PURSUIT:

The Station receives its first visitor through the wormhole from the Gamma Quadrant. The alien, Tosk, is being pursued by a group of hunters. It is soon revealed that the “Tosk” is a lifeform genetically bred to be hunted. Turned over to the hunters under the terms of the Prime Directive, the Tosk can look forward to a life of ridicule and shame. O’Brien frees the Tosk, however, and the hunt continues.

Q-LESS:

On a routine mission to the Gamma Quadrant, Jadzia returns with Picard’s old flame Vash. Following her is Q (who she left with in the TNG episode Q-Pid”). She is trying to break ties with Q and also to seel Gamma Quadrant artifacts to Quark. The crystal she’s carrying, however, draws energy from the station and is pushing it into the wormhole. (Sisko has a quite different way of dealing with Q than did Picard.) I enjoyed the unofficial “crossover” from TNG. This is the last of Vash’s three appearances. It is Q’s only appearance on DS9, but he mentions the Delta Quadrant when he leaves and he will eventually show up on Voyager.

 For me, at least, Q didn't seem to work as well with Sisko as he did with Picard or Janeway.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

Q-LESS:

On a routine mission to the Gamma Quadrant, Jadzia returns with Picard’s old flame Vash. Following her is Q (who she left with in the TNG episode Q-Pid”). She is trying to break ties with Q and also to seel Gamma Quadrant artifacts to Quark. The crystal she’s carrying, however, draws energy from the station and is pushing it into the wormhole. (Sisko has a quite different way of dealing with Q than did Picard.) I enjoyed the unofficial “crossover” from TNG. This is the last of Vash’s three appearances. It is Q’s only appearance on DS9, but he mentions the Delta Quadrant when he leaves and he will eventually show up on Voyager.

“For me, at least, Q didn't seem to work as well with Sisko as he did with Picard or Janeway.”

Although this exchange was fun:

"You hit me. Picard never hit me."

"I'm not Picard."

"Indeed not. You're much easier to provoke."

DAX:

Jadzia Dax is kidnapped by a group of aliens who hold Curzon Dax responsible for a murder years before. I would think the question of whether or not a new host can be held responsible for a symbionts crimes would be settled law by this point, but this episode presents interesting philosophical aspects as did TNG’s “The Measure of a Man” regarding Data. (Dax ends up being proven innocent because he was in bed with the victim’s wife at the time of the murder.)

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