Back when DS9 and Voyager were on the air simultaneously, I remember reading an article in TV Guide which postulated that, in the future, Deep Space Nine would be remembered as the best of the (then) four Star Trek television series. The writer made a compelling argument for his case. I don’t remember his specific reasons, but I can tell you this: I have seen every episode of DS9 once, and once only… with two exceptions: I have seen “Blood Oath” (with the three TOS Klingons) and “Trials & Tribble-ations” multiple times each. Because I am less familiar with DS9 than I am TNG, I will probably spend a bit more time summarizing the episodes than I did with TNG, starting with…

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INVASIVE PROCEDURES: A Trill named Verad, who believes he should have been the recipient of the Dax symbiont, tricks his way aboard the station and, with the help of his mercenary aids, forces the transfer of the symbiont from Jadzia. John Glover (Lionel Luthor from Smallville) plays Dax, and Tim Russ (Tuvok from Star Trek: Voyager) plays a Klingon. There is lots of good character interaction in this one before things are finally set right.

CARDASSIANS: A Bajoran visitor arrives on the station with an adopted Cardassian son. The boy, Rugal, is a war orphan, raised by Bajorans and conditioned to hate his own race. Garak, the tailor and only Cardassian living aboard the station, becomes involved, as does Gul Dukat, who admits the existence of Cardassian orphans left on Bajor on his own orders. Garak and Bashir can find no record of Rugal whatsoever on Bajor. It turns out that Rugal is the son of Dukat’s political opponent, and the entire situation has been engineered by Dulkat to humiliate him. Rugal’s father is played by Robert Mandan (Chester Tate on Soap). As an impartial arbiter (and a father), Sisko decides that, although Rugal has been well-treated and is loved by his Bajoran foster parents, he should be returned to his biological father.

This is the second appearance of Garak, who will become one of my favorite characters on the show. Also, this episode reveals the Cardassian name of the space station: Terok Nor.

PAIR WITH: “Suddenly Human”

MELORA: The titular Ensign Melora Pazlar is from a planet of very low gravity, which necessitates her wearing a brace to walk and using a wheelchair most of the time. Bashir falls for her and suggests a procedure which would allow her to move about in normal gravity. A situation arises in which she uses the zero gravity of the runabout to save the day. She ultimately refuses to undergo the procedure. Melora is played by Daphne Ashebrook.

PAIR WITH: Doctor Who: The Movie

RULES OF ACQUISITION: Young Sheldon’s college professor is back as Grand Nagus Zek, who choose Quark to negotiate a deal with a race in the Gamma Quadrant, but is in reality setting his=m up to fail. Quark is being advised by a new waiter who turns out to be a Feregi female in disguise. The dominion is mentioned for the first time.

Tracy will be out of town for the rest of the week, so this discussion will go on a brief hiatus until she returns.

You gonna watch lots of stuff that she wouldn't wanna?  :)

Jeff of Earth-J said:

RULES OF ACQUISITION: Young Sheldon’s college professor is back as Grand Nagus Zek, who choose Quark to negotiate a deal with a race in the Gamma Quadrant, but is in reality setting his=m up to fail. Quark is being advised by a new waiter who turns out to be a Feregi female in disguise. The dominion is mentioned for the first time.

Tracy will be out of town for the rest of the week, so this discussion will go on a brief hiatus until she returns.

"You gonna watch lots of stuff that she wouldn't wanna? :)"

Last night I watched the first episode of Kung Fu (not the pilot movie but the first episode of the television series). she has also given me permission to watch Ultra Seven without her (we have about seven or eight episodes left) but I have been fordidden to watch DS9 or All in the Family. I have a fall-back list of TV shows to watch on DVD when Tracy is out of town, but I can't seem to remember what they are when she's actually out of town. I remembered Kung Fu only because I forgot to watch it last time. I'm currently "hosting" several "reading projects," so I hope to be able to keep current with those, including my goal of at least one month of Little Orphan Annie per day until I'm caught up.

Ugh. I’ve got to get back into this. Tracy’s been back for weeks now, but we still haven’t gotten back into the habit of watching Deep Space Nine. I like them better when we watch them more frequently rather than less, but we’ve watched only a few episodes since she’s been back. Let me try to barrel through those then move forward.

NECESSARY EVIL: Something about a strongbox hidden on the station from the time of the Cardassian occupation. The action jumps back and forth from five years ago to the present and shows how Odo became the station’s security officer and first met Quark and Kira.

SECOND SIGHT: On the fouth anniversary of the Battle of Wolf 359 (and his wife’s death), Sisko falls in love with a mysterious woman on the promenade deck who suddenly runs away. Later, he meets the wife of a visiting scientist… apparently the same woman… but she doesn’t know him. Later he meets the first woman again and she vanishes before his eyes. Turns out that she is a “psychoprojective telepath” who is so incredibly bored in her marriage that she subconsciously creates projections of herself to act out her fantasies. When her husband finds out, he feels so guilty he commits suicide by flying a shuttle into the star he was reviving.

SANCTUARY: The station rescues a small group of refugees from the other side of the wormhole, a woman, her son and her two consorts. After some initial trouble communicating, the woman reveal that they are fleeing oppression and looking for a legendary planet, their “promised land.” The woman is not the leader of the refugees, but she becomes their leader by virtue of her having found the “Eye of the Universe” (the wormhole). Oh, and there are three million more refugees waiting on the other side. They come through and cause their share of trouble aboard the station, while Sisko searches for a suitable planet. He finds one, but not before they decide the planet they want is (wait for it)… Bajor. The Bajorans do actually consider letting them settle there, but ultimately, they turn them away… perfectly understandable under the circumstances of having just emerged from the Cardassian occupation themselves. The refugees leave after accusing the Bajorans of being apprehensive and mistrustful.

Tracy cheered when it was revealed that the refugees have a matriarchal society because men are considered “too emotional.”

RIVALS: I had a hard time ginning up any interest in this one. It’s a farce, but not a particularly funny one. Basically, a swindler opens a casino on the promenade deck to compete with Quarks. The gambling device he uses actually alters probabilities throughout the station. Actually, the B-plot, a racquetball competition between the overmatched O’Brien and Bashir, was more interesting than the A.

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