Having seen my good friend Jeff's latest TV-based discussion, Jeff Watches Torchwood, I thought, "Since Jeff is posting about a current program that he's watching for the first time, I ought to post about an old program that I'd be watching for what would be at least the fiftieth, but which I haven't looked at in quite some time - and what better program to watch than one of the seminal comedies of its generation, one which had a profound impact on American television, and which went on to inspire such varied fare as Dusty's Trail, Far Out Space Nuts, and Lost.

Gilligan's Island is one of the first television programs I ever remember watching - Having been born in 1963, I was a touch too young to watch it in first-run, but I must've caught it in its earliest re-runs - I'm pretty sure that "Happy Birthday to You" and "The Ballad of Gilligan's Isle" are among the first songs that I knew all the words to.

I debated putting a spoiler warning on this thread - it's hard for me to conceive that there's anyone out there who hasn't seen Gilligan's Island - certainly not in the U.S. Anyway, if by some chance you haven't seen the show, but might want to watch it someday - be forewarned! There will be discussions of plot points, here.

As for the rest of you, "Just sit right back..."

Views: 5540

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I watched "Allergy Time" last night. I've said this before, but I think the show would be funnier without a laugh track. Apparently the Professor sleeps in the supply hut. I was "needle shy," too, when I was a kid; still am to a certain extent. The Professor's proposed treatment rings true (the patient is injected with that which he is allergic to until he builds up a tllerance), but the Professor would have had to have known it was the papaya nut oil which caused the allergic reaction, which he didn't at that time.

Gilligan doesn't seem to have spoiled as many rescues as we all seem to remember, does he?
Well, I, at least, had forgotten just how many episodes weren't about "rescues", as such.
Mr. and Mrs. ???:

The Howells hear a report that the minister that married them was a fraud, and thus come to believe that their marriage was invalid.

Back Story: Mrs. Howell's maiden name was Wentworth. (Interestingly, this episode does not establish her first name as "Eunice".) Her wedding ring belonged to her great-great-great-great grandmother.
The Howells were married by the Reverend Buckley Norris of Boston.
The Skipper has never been married. He has performed at least one marriage before.
Ginger was once in a movie where a ship's captain married a couple.

Taking It Seriously: I have no idea regarding the truth of whether or not ship's captains can perform marriages.

Gilligan Spoils A Rescue: No.
Meet the Meteor:

A meteor lands on the island and is giving off dangerous cosmic rays.

Gilligan dreams of the castaways celebrating their fiftieth year on the island. For some reason, the thing I find most amusing about this is that in Gilligan's dream even the radio announcer is ancient.

Gilligan, the Skipper and the Professor look funny in their silver "anti-radiation" suits - like they're to play aliens on The Time Tunnel.

Back Story: Gilligan knows "Mary-Anns" named Finmglemeyer, Grumschmidt and Dinglehopper.
Mr. Howell has a nephew named Perry, who is married to a woman named Frances.

Taking It Seriously: I am dubious about the science of all this.

Gilligan Spoils A Rescue: No. In fact, Gilligan saves the day by getting the lightning rod into the meteor in time to blow it up.
And here endeth the reveiw of Season Two of Gilligan's Island. "Only" 32 episodes in this season - they were slacking off!
The Baron said:
I have no idea regarding the truth of whether or not ship's captains can perform marriages.

No, they cannot---unless they are also ordained ministers.

See: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/546/are-ships-captains-all...
Interesting. I just did a quick count and, of the first 68 episodes, I see 55 episodes in which Gilligan did not "spoil a rescue". I do believe that this is due to the fact that more episodes than people tend to think didn't really involve "rescues" at all.
Commander Benson said:
The Baron said:
I have no idea regarding the truth of whether or not ship's captains can perform marriages.

No, they cannot---unless they are also ordained ministers.

See: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/546/are-ships-captains-all...

Interesting. I'd always wondered whether that was real, or just something that came up in fiction alot - I seem to recall a Star Trek (the first Romulan episode, I think) where Kirk performs a marriage.

I notice Cecil touches on "common-law" marriage briefly. I seem to recall hearing it argued that since the Howells had lived together as man and wife for so long, theirs would be recognized as a "common-law" marriage. I suppose it would depend on what state they were in.
Up at Bat:

We start Season Three with an episode in which Gilligan is bitten by a bat and believes that he has become a vampire.

Alas, the bat in this poorly-realized, as there are clearly some strings involved. To be fair, they probably weren't so obvious on my old black-and-white set forty years ago.

The highlight of this episode is Gilligan's dream sequence, set in Transylvania in 1895, as two tourists (The Howells) arrive at Belfrey. They encounter the Vampire (Gilligan) and his wife (Ginger), but are saved by Inspector Sherlock (The Professor) and Colonel Watney (The Skipper), who were summoned by the wizened old housekeeper (Mary-Ann). There's even a gag on the Batman TV show as, during a fight scene, we're treated to giant "sound effects" on screen (POW! OOOOF!).

Back Story: None revealed in this episode.

Taking It Seriously: The Professor describes the bat that bit Gilligan as a "red fruit bat", which are only found in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, but this could be a simple error of classification.

Gilligan Spoils A Rescue: No.
Gilligan vs. Gilligan:

A foreign agent altered to resemble Gilligan infiltrates the island.

It's interesting to note that the Professor is the only one who gives Gilligan the benefit of the doubt, when Gilligan reports seeing his double.

Back Story: The Professor has a book entitled A World of Facts.
Gilligan's grandfather had a pocket knife.
Mrs. Howell has acted for charity. She has played Lady Macbeth.
The Gilligan impostor is called Agent 222, and had worked in France, previously.

Taking It Seriously: It's interesting to wonder what the enemy agents (implicitly the Soviets) think the castaways are doing on the island. Agent 222 is said to have had plastic surgery and to have watched film of Gilligan to prepare for his assignment. The Reds have been filming the castaways? Perhaps this goes back to when the cosmonauts landed on the island. And where does the Ghost fit into all this? If you think about it, the castaways are in a much more precarious situation than even they realize.

Gilligan Spoils A Rescue: No.
That IS a lot, by today's standards. It was thought to be extraordinary when 24 debuted that the network committed to (and the producers were expected to make) 24 episodes for the season.


Catching up on this thread, just wanted to note that Fox actually did NOT commit to making 24 episodes. The network only committed to 13 (which itself was a somewhat generous guarantee by network standards.) This had a clear effect on the main storyline, which is actually pretty much wrapped up in 13 hours, followed by an additional 11 hours and a new subplot that feels a bit tacked on, because it more or less was. Unfortunately, subsequent seasons tended to inherit the same problem, with a pretty tight initial plot that resolves itself mid-season, followed by an awkward lurch in a new direction/new subplot.

WTOP radio in Washington was mentioned earlier, and correctly identified as a real station and then-affiliate of CBS. The announcer, "Eddie Gallaher of WTOP," was also a real guy, who passed away in 2003:
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingtonpost/access/465457681.html?di...
The Baron said:


Taking It Seriously: It's interesting to wonder what the enemy agents (implicitly the Soviets) think the castaways are doing on the island. Agent 222 is said to have had plastic surgery and to have watched film of Gilligan to prepare for his assignment. The Reds have been filming the castaways? Perhaps this goes back to when the cosmonauts landed on the island. And where does the Ghost fit into all this? If you think about it, the castaways are in a much more precarious situation than even they realize.

Gilligan Spoils A Rescue: No.

This really does put an interesting spin on things, and even adds a plausible rationale for all the "near miss" rescues. It's tough to buy the premise, but if the KGB or GRU were monitoring the island and taking active measures to thwart the castaways' rescue?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2021   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service