What I've got is the new releases with the enhanced special effects - I'll comment on these as best I can, shame I haven't got the originals to compare and contrast, but such is life. I put up the "spoiler" just on the off chance that there's someone here that hasn't seen all these a million times - you never know, I suppose.

Views: 7723

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion



Philip Portelli said:

Believe it or not, the "Flivver" is the only land vehicle that the crew uses throughout the series! These guys did a LOT of walking around!  At least Lost In Space had the Chariot.

I never thought about that, but I do believe you are correct. I guess the budget didn't cover a "Trekmobile".

The Immunity Syndrome:

Written by Robert Sabaroff

Directed by Joseph Pevney

 

Synopsis: The one with the giant space amoeba.

 

Thoughts:

1)"The Intrepid is manned by Vulcans, isn't it?"  It actually makes more sense to me that ships would tend to be crewed by members of one race, rather than have mixed crews.  Not because different species can't work together, but because different races would have different biological needs. Vulcan probably keep their ship warmer than the Enterprise, for example.

 

2)"The Intrepid, it just...died."  Spock's reaction here makes me think of Obi-Wan's reaction to the destruction of Alderaan. Actually, there's a fair bit of Star Trek in Star Wars, if you watch carefully.

 

3)Have you ever noticed that Kirk tends to pronounce "Kyle" as "Cowl"?

 

4)"You speak of the objective hardness of the Vulcan heart, yet how little room there seems to be in yours."  "Suffer the death of thy neighbor, eh, Spock? You wouldn't wish that on us, would you?" "It might have rendered youe history a bit less bloody."  Nice exchange between Spock and McCoy here.

 

5)"Vulcan has not been conquered within its collective memory."  Interesting.

 

6)The space amoeba is an interesting idea, very "out there".

 

7)Someone on the production team can't spell "hangar".

 

8)"Tell Doctor McCoy he should have wished me luck."  Burn!

 

9)"Shut up, Spock, we're rescuing you!" "Why thank you, Captain McCoy."  I love Shatner's expressions during this bit.

 

10)"I'm still looking forward to a nice period of rest and relaxation on some lovely...planet." Kirk's horny, uh-huh-huh-huh.

 

Overall:

Another very good episode - an interesting piece of science fiction.

A Private Little War:

Teleplay by Gene Roddenberry/Story by Jud Crucis

Directed by Marc Daniels

 

Synopsis:  Kirk gets caught up in an arms race on a primitive planet.

 

Thoughts:

1)"Lucky his heart's where his liver should be, or he'd be dead."  Where's his liver, then?

 

2)"He'll live or die, now, Jim - I don't know which."  Very helpful, Bones.

 

3)"Doctor M'Benga interned in a Vulcan ward."  Interesting character, wish they'd done more with him.

 

4)"If the Klingons are breaking the treaty..." Wouldn't the Organians just know? I have the feeling the Organians stopped the immediate war, then quickly lost all interest.

 

5)Always liked the Mugato, although for some reason it's credited as the "Gumato". It's played by Janos Prohaska, who did alot of costume work back in the day.

 

6)Nona's a bit over the top, a little too exaggerated of a performance.

 

7)"I suppose he even knows you were holding his hand."' Great scene.

 

8)The mahko root creeped me out when I was alittle kid - it's still kind of creepy.

 

9)"Hit me!" 

 

10)"Two giant powers involved, much like the Klingons and ourselves.."  "Message coming through, sir."

 

11)For all his agonizing, Kirk's interfering because he wants to, again. I don't really blame him, necessarily, can't just let  the Reds Klingons take over the planet, I suppose, but he's still just letting it get personal. Of course, the whole "non-interference" thing always seems to get fuzzy when they find a resource-rich planet.

 

Overall:

An OK episode - a somewhat heavy-handed political allegory, but not bad.

 

Doctor M'Benga reappeared in the episode "That Which Survives", which aired 24 January 1969, almost a year after "A Private Little War".

 

Unfortunately, "That Which Survives" didn't flesh out the character of M'Benga.  It didn't even reference in background in treating Vulcans.  It was basically a generic part that called for an Enterprise medical officer other than McCoy.  When it came time to fill the part, probably someone in casting remembered the previous episode calling for a doctor-other-than-McCoy on Enterprise and called back the actor who played him, Booker Bradshaw, with a simple pencil change on the script to use the name "M'Benga".

 

I, too, wish they had done more with M'Benga.  I liked the authority that Bradshaw brought to the character.  Not to mention the fact that---not that the show ever demonstrated any inkling of common sense along this line---it would have been more pragmatic to send one of McCoy's medical staff on a landing party, if a physician was called for.  The Chief Medical Officer of a vessel is usually up to his elbows in paperwork and leadership responsibilities to go on planet-side jaunts.

 

The substituting M'Benga for McCoy would have had an interesting effect on the character dynamic between the doctor and Kirk and Spock.  With his Vulcan training, M'Benga would have been more in tune with Spock's nature.  At the same time, with M'Benga's strong personality, any disagreement with Captain Kirk would have more friction.

 

Unfortunately, I don't think Roddenberry and company desired to upset the character balance of "the Big Three".  And I'd make book that Shatner would have nixed the idea of giving more face time to an actor with such a strong stage presence.

 

 

Return to Tomorrow:

Written by John Kingsbridge

Directed by Ralph Senensky

 

Synopsis: Members of an ancient race want to "borrow" some bodies.

 

Thoughts:

1)There's Diana Muldaur, makeing her first appearance, here as Doctor Ann Mulhall. I always remember her from Born Free.

 

2)"That would tend, however, to explain certain elements of Vulcan prehistory.  This episode is the closest the old show ever came to addressing the issue of why there are so many human-looking races in the galaxy, although as I recall, STTNG addressed it more drirectly.

 

3)"There comes to all races an ultimate crisis, which you have yet to face."  Are there red skies and waves of antimatter?

 

4)"Risk is our business".  And "Peace is our profession"?

 

5)"Oh, you are a lovely female!"  He makes her sound like a cocker spaniel.

 

6)"I'm surprised the Vulcans never conquered your race."  Nimoy plays "evil" well, but he's a little too obviously a heel, here.

 

7)"I will not peddle flesh. I'm a physician."  Pills, sure, but not flesh!

 

8)"Mister Spock's consciousness was placed in me."  That was something I didn't see coming the first time I saw this!

 

Overall:

An OK episode, though not a particular favorite of mine.

 

 

"Oh, you are a lovely female!"

This reminds me of the quirk in Stan Lee's dialogue where so many of his characters refer to women as "females".

Patterns of Force:

Written by John Meredyth Lucas

Directed by Vincent McEveety

 

Synopsis:  The one with the Nazi planet.

 

Thoughts:

1)I confess that when I first saw this, I did not pick up on the "Zeon"/"Zion" connection, even though the first two Zeons we meet are named "Isak" and "Abrom".

 

2)John GIll - "He was my instructor at the Academy."  Yet another Federation bigshot that screws up bigtime.

 

3)"We were attacked by a thermonuclear missile from a planet which should have no such weapon." "Everybody got that?"

 

4)"You should make a very convincing Nazi."  I always wonder how it feels for Jewish actors to play Nazis. I mean, I understand that they're actors, they don't expect (or, I imagine, want) that every part they play is going to be someone that they personally find admirable, but I have to think it must be a little weird.

 

5)Don't think I've ever seen this one in color, before - never noticed the little touch that Spock's wounds are green-colored rather than red.

 

6)Someone seems to have told the folks playing Nazis to overact like nobody's business.

 

7)"Without us to hate, there'd be nothing to hold them together."

 

8)There's some nice comedy between Shatner and Nimoy, as Spock keeps on talking while he's perched on Kirk's back.

 

9)"I'm beginning to understand why you Earthmen enjoy gambling." "Next Episode: Kirk takes Spock to the dogtrack!"

 

10)"Send him down naked if you have to!" That might counteract any stealth they were trying for.

 

11)"Most efficient state Earth ever knew."  OK, here we come to the point that makes this whole episode unbelievable to me. How could a trained historian have possibly thought that this was a good idea? Also, from everything I've read, this business about fascists being "efficient" was largely propaganda. The only way this might make sense is if they're so far in the future that even historians have lost all sense of what the Nazis were really like.  Or that GIll was a closet fascist all along.

 

12)"Eneg is one of us."  Well, that's convenient.

 

13)"Note the low forehead denoting stupidity."  You can see McCoy's in the background, storing all this up.

 

14)"Darn clever, these Earthmen, wouldn't you say?"  "Yes, Earthmen like Ramses, Alexander, Caesar, Napoleon, Hitler, Lee Kuan. Your whole Earth history is made up of men seeking absolute power."

 

15)"Special Appearance by Skip Homeier as Melakon" - What's so special about it?

 

Overall:

The epsiode has its fun moments, as long as you ignore the fact that the whole premise is insane.

 

 

 

 

I always wonder how it feels for Jewish actors to play Nazis.

Actually, in this case Shatner and Nimoy were playing non-Nazis only pretending to be Nazis, which is a little different.

By Any Other Name:

Teleplay by D.C. Fontana and Jerome Bixby/Story by Jerome Bixby

Directed by Marc Daniels

 

Synopsis: Invaders from Andromeda take over the ship.

 

Thoughts:

1)When we first see Rojan and Kelinda, they do a really good job of looking like aliens pretending to be human.

 

2)"There is an energy barrier at the rim of your galaxy." "Yes, I know, we've been there." A callback to "Where No Man Has Gone Before".

 

3)"On Eminiar VII, you were able to teick the guard by a Vulcan mind probe." A callback to "A Taste of Armageddon".

 

4)Shatner does a very good job conveying Kirk's anguish when Rojan crushes the cube.

 

5)"Vulcans have the ability to place themselves in a kind of trance."  As Spock did in "A Private Little War". Lots of continuity in this.

 

6)Funny how Kirk reacts to blowing up the ship as unthinkable.

 

7)"It appears we four are the only ones the Kelvans consider essential."  It's a wonder the Kelvans felt they needed any of them.

 

8)Do you think that if you served on the Enterprise that it might occasionally worry you that the chief engineer likes to drink so much?

 

9)Whereas Kirk immediately thinks of sex.

 

10)On the other hand, Spock makes a good s***-stirrer for someone who claims not to understand emotions.

 

11)"What is it?" "Well, it's um...it's green." One of my all-time favorite scenes. It helps that I've lived that scenario a time or twelve over the years.

 

12)And so our heroes win by being really obnoxious.

 

Overall:

An amusing little episode. It's interesting to think how the Kelvans ended up - the response to the robot probe to Andromeda might've made a good STTNG episode.

I suspect that as acting professionals, this wouldn't have phased them one bit.  They are actors, used to taking on whatever the roles require of them.  I don't think it would have meant a thing to them.  It was just 'this week's script."

Richard Willis said:

I always wonder how it feels for Jewish actors to play Nazis.

Actually, in this case Shatner and Nimoy were playing non-Nazis only pretending to be Nazis, which is a little different.

The Omega Glory:

Written by Gene Roddenberry

Directed by Vincent McEveety

 

Thoughts:

1)"Commanded by Ron Tracey, one of the most experienced captains in the Starfleet." Starfleet needs better screening procedures.

 

2)"Without water, we're all just three or four pounds of chemicals."  The empty uniforms were kind of creepy.

 

3)"Their bacteriological warfare experiments in the 1990's."   I don't suppose we know for sure that there weren't any.

 

4)It's a nice touch that in their first fight, Tracey beats Kirk, so that when they fight the second time, it seems less like an automatic win for Kirk.

 

5)"Pity you can't teach me that." "I have tried, Captain." You gotta have the touch.

 

6)"The yellow civilization is almost destroyed, the white civilization is destroyed." Color-coded civilizations...

 

7)"Freedom?" That's a fun line read to imitate at random.

 

8)Cloud William really brains Kirk with that bar - lucky he's not concussed or dead.  Kirk must have an extra-thick skull.

 

9)"It might eventually cure the common cold."  I've always liked the idea that even in the far future, people still get colds.

 

10)"The parallell is almost too close, Captain."  Funny how two episodes ago Kirk (rightly) disdained that the Ekosians could've developed the ideology and iconography of Nazi Germany without outside interference, but here, where the parallel is even more impossibly close, he just sort of runs with it. Even when I was a kid, this scenario made no sense to me.  As I recall, my rationale at the time was that in the early days of space travel, Red Chinese and American colony ships both fell into the same timewarp, and ended up on Omega IV thousands of years in the past. Instead of cooperating, they maintained their old rivalry, and ended up fighting a war.  Kind of lame, but it was the best I could come up with.

 

11)"He has no heart." Check where his liver should be.

 

12)"Eed pleb nista." 

 

13)"Spock, I've found that Evil usually triumphs, unless Good is very, very careful." McCoy is not an optimist.

 

14)One thing that has always stuck with me is the way Shatner pronounces "trahnquility" here.

 

15)"That which you call 'Eed pleb nista' was not written for the chiefs or the kings or the warriors or the rich and powerful, but for all the people! Down the centuries, you have slurred the meaning of the words, 'We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic trahnquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution.' These words and the words that follow were not written only for the Yangs, but for the Kohms as well!" "The Kohms? "" They must apply to everyone or they mean nothing! Do you understand?"  No, Jim, we're still working on it.

 

16)"There's no question of his guilt, but does our involvement here also constitute a violation of the Prime Directive?" "We merely showed them the meaning of what they were fighting for."   Remember, Spock, it's OK if Jim Kirk does it. Also, did they really help the Yangs all that much?  "Your sacred words, which you obviously can't read, don't say what you thought they did. Well, we gotta go."

 

Overall:

As long as you can set aside the fact that the reveal makes no sense whatsoever, this is actually quite an enjoyable episode - lots of fun action, and you get to watch Shatner recite the preamble to the Constitution as only he can.

 

 

 

The Baron:

""The parallell is almost too close, Captain."  Funny how two episodes ago Kirk (rightly) disdained that the Ekosians could've developed the ideology and iconography of Nazi Germany without outside interference, but here, where the parallel is even more impossibly close, he just sort of runs with it. Even when I was a kid, this scenario made no sense to me.  As I recall, my rationale at the time was that in the early days of space travel, Red Chinese and American colony ships both fell into the same timewarp, and ended up on Omega IV thousands of years in the past. Instead of cooperating, they maintained their old rivalry, and ended up fighting a war.  Kind of lame, but it was the best I could come up with."

The problem, of course, is that THE OMEGA GLORY was written about 2 YEARS BEFORE all those other "parallel Earth" stories.  It was intended as the FIRST such story.  And, according to the IMDB, when they started, they weren't quite sure exactly how far in the future STAR TREK was going to take place.  Apparently, in the original script, the Yangs & Kohms WERE from Earth, a "lost colony" in fact.  So the story did make much more sense when it was written-- just, not when it was filmed.

With ST being only 250-300 years in the future, a time warp added to the mix DOES allow it to still make perfect sense (except nobody ionvolved in making it thought to include it in the finished version).

Between the exact duplicate of Earth, the biological plague, and the vastly-extended lifespans, it hit me that this REJECTED script was probably drastically re-written and became "MIRI".  Note the exact duplicate of Earth's continents made no sense in that story (and was never followed up on), while it would have made much more sense had it been left in this one (it was probably dropped from this one because it had already been used before).

This story also would have been the 1st introduction of the whole "Prime Directive" concept.  Note that was also a huge part of "BREAD AND CIRCUSES", which was actually filmed before both A PIECE OF THE ACTION and PATTERNS OF FORCE, but run after.  (I'm guessing it was held back because someone at NBC objected either to the violence, or the mention of religion.  I saw the same thing happen with an early WKRP episode involving religion, which was filmed 3rd but held back until the summer reruns more than 6 months later.)

Crazy enough, both Morgan Woodward (Ron Tracey) AND Roy Jensen (Cloud William) appeared together as thugs working for Robert Loggia in an episode of TARZAN, "King of the Dwasari", made the SAME year as this!

Try watching this one immediately after WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE next time, and see if it makes more sense if slotted in there.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Welcome!

No flame wars. No trolls. But a lot of really smart people.The Captain Comics Round Table tries to be the friendliest and most accurate comics website on the Internet.

SOME ESSENTIALS:

RULES OF THE ROUND TABLE

MODERATORS

SMILIES FOLDER

TIPS ON USING THE BOARD

FOLLOW US:

OUR COLUMNISTS:

Groups

© 2019   Captain Comics, board content ©2013 Andrew Smith   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service