From SDCC:

THE FLASH BRINGS TWO DC COMICS CHARACTERS TO CENTRAL CITY FOR SEASON TWO

Teddy Sears (Masters of Sex) Joins the Cast as Jay Garrick and Shantel VanSanten (The Messengers, The Final Destination) as Patty Spivot

BURBANK, Calif. (July 11, 2015) — Hit Super Hero action/drama The Flash (Tuesdays 8/7c The CW) is getting up to speed for season two by bringing two new characters to join The Fastest Man Alive in Central City, with both hailing from the DC Comics Universe.

Teddy Sears photo by Rainer Hosch

Teddy Sears (Masters of Sex, Raising the Bar) has been cast as Jay Garrick, who is well known to comic book fans as the first DC Comics character to take on the mantle of The Flash. In the TV show, Jay is a mysterious figure who arrives in Central City to warn Barry Allen and his team at S.T.A.R. Labs of an impending danger that he alone cannot hope to stop.

The Flash executive producer Andrew Kreisberg said, “Having Jay Garrick come onto the show was one of our earliest ideas. It is so exciting, as we rush into season two, that we finally get to bring the Crimson Comet to life. We couldn’t imagine anyone more suited to play the original Flash than Teddy.”

Shantel VanSanten photo by Smile XXVII Studios

Shantel VanSanten (The Messengers, The Final Destination, One Tree Hill) has been set for the role of Patty Spivot. A more recent addition to The Flash’s comic book history, Patty Spivot is a police officer and science enthusiast who catches the eye of Barry Allen. Patty is obsessed with metahumans and partners with Det. Joe West this season but has no idea that her new crush is The Flash.

 “We were huge fans of The Messengers and are excited to have Shantel join us to help complicate Barry Allen’s love life in season two,” said Kreisberg.

Based on the characters from DC Comics, The Flash is from Bonanza Productions Inc. in association with Berlanti Productions and Warner Bros. Television. The series returns for season two on Tuesday, October 6, at 8/7c on The CW.

Jay Garrick, copyright DC Entertainment Inc.

Patty Spivot, copyright DC Entertainment Inc.

THE FLASH signing photos (Sat, July 11): http://comiccon.thewb.com/the-flash-signing-3/ or https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153587427978777.1073741...

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Oh, definitely! That was one of my favorite bits of trivia when I was a kid. Now that I'm older, I can see that it's a really lousy way to treat someone you love -- but back then I thought it was perfectly acceptable.

Watched the January 26 episode last night. I think The Flash is a smart show. That’s why it annoys me when the main characters do stupid things. Barry refuses to admit to Patty that he’s the Flash, a fact she already knows… why, now? I like that she figured it out for herself, but the way Barry stubbornly refused to admit it to her shows a lack of respect that smacks of writer’s fiat in that the writers wanted her out of the story for a while. The fact that she ultimately left with little ramification to their relationship just makes it that much more obvious.

My favorite scene was when the Flash removed the semis tires at super speed. Very convincing! There was a time (not too long ago) when that kind of thing could be pulled off convincingly only on the pages of a comic book. I still prefer my super-heroes on the printed page to the small (or any) screen, but the TV shows and movies are getting better.

My take was that he didn't want to be responsible for her knowing. If she figured it out, fine, but he wasn't going to tell her and have it on his head. Although he should have stopped at, "I can't tell you that," which was kind of true, rather than added "I'm not him," which was a lie.

The problem with his thinking is that there are already plenty of people for a villain to choose from to hurt him, although obviously one less is one less. I also don't know that Flash will be any less fast to try to protect any innocent from harm than his friends (who knew the job was dangerous).

That was always the problem with Superman's "I can't marry you, Lois, someone might hurt you" line, since marriage didn't really expand the target on her back. If Zoom kidnapped Patty right now, having seen them together, would the Flash shrug and say, "Sorry, we're not dating any more?"

Plus, by denying himself their friendship, love and help of these people, the terrorist win, as the saying goes. Living well is the best revenge.

-- MSA

That line would have worked better for me, Craig -- not just because it wouldn't have been a lie, but because it would give some nuance to the situation, rather than the complete shut-out she got. Patty's more capable of taking care of herself in dangerous situations than half the team; I'd like to see Barry respect that.

Sometimes it seems like half of Central City knows his secret identity. Maybe the thing to take away is that Barry cares a lot about Patty and doesn't want to lose her forever. I think she makes a great match for hiim.

I loved her trick on the train.

I loved the wheels-off super-speed trick too -- in fact, I loved it when it was in the comics in the Silver Age, although I don't remember which issue he did it in. (It was a car, not a truck.) It was the trick that made the Li'l Capn go "Wow!" and realize how cool super-speed would be.

The whole Patty Spivot thing made me grit my teeth, for all the reasons enumerated here. In the Jan. 19 episode, Harrison-2 tells Barry that telling Patty he's the Flash would put her in danger, and in that very same episode she is kidnapped and almost killed by The Turtle. I think the message that Barry got (and we were supposed to) was just how dangers being around him was, but the message *I* got is that she's in danger anyway, and to use Craig's phrase, telling her he's the Flash wouldn't expand the target on her back any more. Further, he should tell her, because forewarned is forearmed. Why should, say, Zoom know more about The Flash than the woman who is (unsuspectingly) dating him? The message I got was that it was safer for all concerned if he told her, not more dangerous.

The show's still a lot of fun, and this was an obvious CW/young adult romance show trope (she'll be back) but it smacked of writer's fiat, which always bugs me.

BTW, they sure talk a lot about doing something about Zoom, but never seem to be doing anything about it. I guess they could be working off-camera, but their best show was The Turtle, and they tossed him in a cell and forgot about him. Well, most of them did. And then how long did it take before they found out that he was dead?

Captain Comics said:

I loved the wheels-off super-speed trick too -- in fact, I loved it when it was in the comics in the Silver Age, although I don't remember which issue he did it in. (It was a car, not a truck.) It was the trick that made the Li'l Capn go "Wow!" and realize how cool super-speed would be.

I think in the comics he took off the wheels of a car because he could. On the show he did it to stop the truck from crashing into something very dangerous, which was not just goofing around.

Further, he should tell her, because forewarned is forearmed. Why should, say, Zoom know more about The Flash than the woman who is (unsuspectingly) dating him? The message I got was that it was safer for all concerned if he told her, not more dangerous.

It has occurred to me that Gwen Stacy would have been safer if she knew she was in danger. As it is, she went to her grave not understanding why the Green Goblin kidnapped her. Maybe she would have carried a can of pepper spray or mace, if such were available at that time.

Patty of all of them is capable of defending herself and was in the mix anyway as part of the task force. He's right that those close to him seem to be targeted more often (possibly because, oh, everyone knows who he is), but she carries a gun, for god's sake.

I'd think it would be worth telling her just under any circumstances so she knew who to call when she got into trouble--and she was the point woman for trouble, since she went out looking for it most often. And, as with Iris, it creates a bad situation when she figures it out and realizes every single person around her already knew.

Although if I were part of the meta-human Task Force, I'd get STAR Labs to make me up something a little more special than a glock. It always bothered me with Torchwood that Captain Jack was running around after these gigantic, powerful aliens pointing a six-shot revolver at them. And the Task Force does have some resources. A cold gun seems useful, for instance.

they sure talk a lot about doing something about Zoom, but never seem to be doing anything about it.

I figure they're working on ideas off-screen but don't have anything conclusive. They need to find a way to lure him in, hold him and take away his speed. That's a lot to do without much to work with. So I don't mind them not doing anything about him, I just mind that they talk like they're too busy to do it.

their best shot was The Turtle, and they tossed him in a cell and forgot about him

I try not to think about how that cell works. Is there a bathroom that pops out of the corner? Is the guy in complete stasis so he can just wear the same clothes forever? They occasionally show him being fed, but it's a fair amount of work to maintain an imprisoned guy.

Is there anyone in the cells now, or have they all conveniently disappeared over time? They talk like it's long-term storage, but I don't see how that works, and I don't know that it's ever come to that, fortuitously.

-- MSA

The DEO has that same kind of a cell on Supergirl. I try not to think about it too much, either.

I understand they're going after Zoom on Earth 2 soon.

The cell bothers me in that we seem to be imprisoning people without trial.

Maxwell Lord made that very point on Supergirl (evoking Guantanamo Bay).

Yeah, the Flash gang are breaking the law big time with the unlawful imprisonment. And, as MSA says, there's a lot of maintenance to do. What if someone dies, and -- *awp!* -- it's already happened! The Turtle died* in his cell, which makes them legally responsible for his death.

* Yeah, we know he was murdered, but nobody else does, like the police. (Hello, Joe? You will lose your badge for this, and likely be imprisoned yourself.) And even if Harry-2's crime is discovered, they are all still accessories.

But like everyone says, I try not to think about it when I'm watching the show. It seems like on Earth-DCTV, regular law enforcement is absolutely useless, and both heroes and villains act as if it doesn't exist. So I try to pretend it doesn't exist as well.

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