...Following in the massive footprints of the " Incomprehensible Idiot  " thread , I present...........

  ME !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson was the first US publisher to make a go of new-content comics, and New Fun was his first title, but it wasn't the first. A title modelled after newspaper comic sections called The Funnies appeared in 1929-30. A publisher called Humor Publishing published three original one-shots in 1933. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster prepared a story starring an early version of Superman for the publisher but the plan was aborted by its withdrawal from comics publishing.

 

Arguably, comics already existed elsewhere. The "UK Comics and Australian" section at Comic Book Plus has pre-New Fun items that mix comics and text features that I think one could count as comics: examples are issues of Film Fun, The Funny Wonder, Jester, Playbox, Puck. (However, it seems to me strained to call the issues of Alley Sloper's Half Holiday in the archive comics.) Denis Gifford edited a book on early British comics called Victorian Comics: there's an image of it here at the bottom of the page.

 

I wrote about an ad for Fatty Finn's Weekly in a late 1934 issue of The Australian Women's Weekly here, but its contents were not all-new ("Brick Bradford" was certainly a newspaper reprint), and some of the advertised features may have been text stories. I also don't know at what date the first issue hit the stands. Fatty Finn was a character created by the Australian cartoonist Syd Nicholls.

 

The distinction between early comics and Sunday newspaper comics sections is not always all that meaningful: the comics features in those early British comics were often one-pagers or less, and Wheeler-Nicholson's earliest comics were made up of one-page and part-page features.

 

New Fun became More Fun with #7 and More Fun Comics with #9, so it's possible to quibble over whether it's properly said to be the first successful non-reprint US comic. I wrote around that issue above.

...Wwweell , working from memory ( Naaaah . Now I checked it out .) , I recall:

  A circa-1929 thing from a Dell?? called simply THE FUNNIES which was essentially a Sunday comics section without the newspaper inside with entirely new strips is kind of seen as " the first original-material comic book " plus there was Humor Publications' DETECTIVE DAN from 1933 and I recall seeing a few other Humor Publications mags listed - and , iegel and Shuster IIRC sent an early version of Superman to them which was accepted and was supposed to be published and whatever the material they sent to HP is lost !

*-I think this concepts been tried numerous times over the years - Pretty generally unsuccessfully , I do believe .

...Okay , here's someone's page on , um , Platinum Age (I guess ?????) funnybooks...

www.thecomicbooks.com/nsp1-01.html

Thanks, E.D. The page also mentions two further original items from Dell from the very early 30s, Clancy the Cop and Deadwood Gulch. The GCD has images of these. I'm not clear from the GCD's page on The Funnies whether the first four issues were connected to Dell. Their indicia publisher was apparently Film Humor, Inc.

...A secondary/disguise/tax dodge company for Dell ?????????

Luke Blanchard said:

Thanks, E.D. The page also mentions two further original items from Dell from the very early 30s, Clancy the Cop and Deadwood Gulch. The GCD has images of these. I'm not clear from the GCD's page on The Funnies whether the first four issues were connected to Dell. Their indicia publisher was apparently Film Humor, Inc.

It's possible, but it might also have been an outfit established to publish the title that Dell took over. I don't have enough information to say.

Publishers today would kill for a print run of 400,000 selling out 100%!

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Okay , here's someone's page on , um , Platinum Age (I guess ?????) funnybooks...

www.thecomicbooks.com/nsp1-01.html

...This UK PUCK somehow had the name seperately from (what I guess was) the Hearst newspapers' name for all or most of his newspapers' comics sections (Were all Hearst newspapers exactly the same - at least the division 1 ones - in their Sunday funnies ? I've seen indications of the Hearst Sunday comics sections being nationally advertised on radio in the USA of that time . There was at least one 30s market - New York City - where Hearst had two " full-fledged " newspapers , a broadsheet and a tabloid ~ Others ?) , " PUCK , THE COMICS WEEKLY " ?

  Like US and UK Decca records split the name then , IIRC .

  THE PHANTOM APPEARED in strip reprints The Australian Women's Weekly , Luke !!!!!!!!!!!

Luke Blanchard said:

Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson was the first US publisher to make a go of new-content comics, and New Fun was his first title, but it wasn't the first. A title modelled after newspaper comic sections called The Funnies appeared in 1929-30. A publisher called Humor Publishing published three original one-shots in 1933. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster prepared a story starring an early version of Superman for the publisher but the plan was aborted by its withdrawal from comics publishing.

 

Arguably, comics already existed elsewhere. The "UK Comics and Australian" section at Comic Book Plus has pre-New Fun items that mix comics and text features that I think one could count as comics: examples are issues of Film Fun, The Funny Wonder, Jester, Playbox, Puck. (However, it seems to me strained to call the issues of Alley Sloper's Half Holiday in the archive comics.) Denis Gifford edited a book on early British comics called Victorian Comics: there's an image of it here at the bottom of the page.

 

I wrote about an ad for Fatty Finn's Weekly in a late 1934 issue of The Australian Women's Weekly here, but its contents were not all-new ("Brick Bradford" was certainly a newspaper reprint), and some of the advertised features may have been text stories. I also don't know at what date the first issue hit the stands. Fatty Finn was a character created by the Australian cartoonist Syd Nicholls.

 

The distinction between early comics and Sunday newspaper comics sections is not always all that meaningful: the comics features in those early British comics were often one-pagers or less, and Wheeler-Nicholson's earliest comics were made up of one-page and part-page features.

 

New Fun became More Fun with #7 and More Fun Comics with #9, so it's possible to quibble over whether it's properly said to be the first successful non-reprint US comic. I wrote around that issue above.

...And during the Depression , too !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Richard Willis said:

Publishers today would kill for a print run of 400,000 selling out 100%!

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Okay , here's someone's page on , um , Platinum Age (I guess ?????) funnybooks...

www.thecomicbooks.com/nsp1-01.html

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

THE PHANTOM APPEARED in strip reprints The Australian Women's Weekly , Luke !!!!!!!!!!!

Not quite: Mandrake the Magician ran in it for decades, from the 30s well into my time (that's why I was looking at those old issues!) Apparently The Phantom ran in The Australian's Women's Mirror.

...Okay , I gave a full read , in the sun of a San Jose blvd. waiting for a bus , to the first ish I'd bought of BATMAN '66 .

My verdict ???

Uh , okay , and it actually taking place in 1966 is a nice touch...Was that " Russian " villaness from the TV show - Interesting to see a $3.99 Johnny DC-line title (with 30 pages of story , so , 'kay...) .

Isn't it ironic , though , that old-guard fans who for years denounced the Baqtman comics of the immediately TV-influenced period , found them the worst of the worst , are oooing and ahhing over this ???

  Well , i think so .

  But again , maybe irony is dead...

...The " blvd. " I was speaking of was San Carlos St. , noted for its copious used-car lots and tattoo parlors...

Emerkeith Davyjack said:

...Okay , I gave a full read , in the sun of a San Jose blvd. waiting for a bus , to the first ish I'd bought of BATMAN '66 .

My verdict ???

Uh , okay , and it actually taking place in 1966 is a nice touch...Was that " Russian " villaness from the TV show - Interesting to see a $3.99 Johnny DC-line title (with 30 pages of story , so , 'kay...) .

Isn't it ironic , though , that old-guard fans who for years denounced the Baqtman comics of the immediately TV-influenced period , found them the worst of the worst , are oooing and ahhing over this ???

  Well , i think so .

  But again , maybe irony is dead...

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