I love Blackest Night, but I am tired of everyone assuming there will be a white lantern (or lanterns). It's too easy to go there--I think Geoff Johns is a better writer than that. Infact -- If there's a white lantern, I'll frickin, wear white underpants (tighty whiteys), and run down the street -- That's how positive I am that isn't going to happen. It's too predictable and he's quite good at throwing curve balls. I could see white energy from the various rings being combined, but I just don't see an actual white lantern or lanterns.

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I don't see the White Lanterns as a cop-out at all.

It's a logical step that Johns double-faked us out on earlier in the series. If there is a being embodying death, it makes sense that there is one embodying life. If the being embodying death has a corps, the the being embodying life has one too. Sure, if Johns hadn't done the "combining all the colors" thing earlier in the series, every one of us would have seen it coming. He made the logical look illogical, to throw us all off.

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." -Groucho Marx

Check out the Secret Headquarters (my store) website! It's a pretty lame website, but I did it myself, so tough noogies

Listen to WOXY.com, it's the future of rock-n-roll!


Dagwan said:
I don't see the White Lanterns as a cop-out at all.

It's a logical step that Johns double-faked us out on earlier in the series. If there is a being embodying death, it makes sense that there is one embodying life. If the being embodying death has a corps, the the being embodying life has one too. Sure, if Johns hadn't done the "combining all the colors" thing earlier in the series, every one of us would have seen it coming. He made the logical look illogical, to throw us all off.

Agreed. I mean, I haven't read the series, but strictly from a storytelling perspective, it's kind of where the story had to go. A pre-determined end-point isn't necessarily a cop-out; it just makes the story about the journey to get to there, and seeing what things look like once you're there. It's the difference between "How will this story end?" and "What will this story's end mean?" Some stories are more about the former; others more about the latter.
As an incentive, and proof, here is a shot of me wearing all 8 rings.

I've already told the guys at my FLCS to keep an eye out for the White ring when it comes out.
Yeah, I don't think it was a cop-out, either. It's a cool idea -- and also, "White Lantern" could have mean many things. Most people, at least early on, seemed to think it would be a combining of the colors, but that's not what it was.

The big problem with the White Lantern thing is this: The comic took 9 months to come out. We had nine months to think about it, and for us to look for the logical conclusion -- and every step of the way, with more and more information at our disposal, that logical conclusion became more and more refined.

As an OGN, this would have blown minds. In the collected edition, it will blow minds. But to people who've spent a year (including solicits, longer if we include all the preview/prelude stuff) thinking about all this, the story moving toward the only conclusion that could satisfy the premise gets a "meh" from some quarters. That's the nature of long-form storytelling in monthly comics.Conclusions will *always* disappoint. For monthly readers, the swerve is the most important part, and the conclusion can only satisfy if it's the beginning of something else.
I have found someone to document my loss.

I'm a man of my word so I will go thru it. My only hope is DC finally, FINALLY, gets it's cosmology straight and goes with this, simple easy to digest path.

Reign in it all DC, reign it in.

Don't make this embarrassment worth nothing.
This will not be for nothing, Larfleeze. You do regain the measure of honor that you offered up when you made this bet, and you will take it back when you make good. There is NO shame in this, no dishonor, and I for one will count you as an honorable man.

This may not sound like much, but in these trying times, they should.

Yes, I know I sound like a Klingon or Medevial Knight saying all that, but I for one care not.

As inspiration, I hearby offer THIS as well. I fully accept that many of you will be laughing at this picture. Go right ahead. I have a very healthy sense of humor, because I dress up like THIS for the Prospect Park Haunted Walk every year.
Rob said ...the conclusion can only satisfy if it's the beginning of something else.

Satisfy who?

You've just stated why I've all but stopped buying monthly superhero comics.

Larfreeze said My only hope is DC finally, FINALLY, gets it's cosmology straight and goes with this, simple easy to digest path.

So all future DC writers have to follow this demented 'Gospel according to Johns'?

...I don't think so.
Maybe satisfy isn't the right word, Figs -- I went off on a little tear there. But for monthly readers, the conclusion never packs as much punch as the swerve -- and when we get to Blackest Night 8, for instance, most of us aren't really talking about the white Lantern fight or anything that happened in the story -- except for the resurrections, which are springboards for the next story.

That's the cosmic treadmill we're on.
Figserello said:
Rob said ...the conclusion can only satisfy if it's the beginning of something else.
Satisfy who?

Rob Steager said:
For monthly readers, the swerve is the most important part, and the conclusion can only satisfy if it's the beginning of something else.
Emphasis mine.

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." -Groucho Marx

Check out the Secret Headquarters (my store) website! It's a pretty lame website, but I did it myself, so tough noogies

Listen to WOXY.com, it's the future of rock-n-roll!


Well, I used to be a monthly reader, and now I'm not really, mainly because of this 'cosmic treadmill' we're talking about. A satisfying conclusion is traditionally thought to be an essential part of a good story.

"For monthly readers who like this kind of thing..." I can accept though.

I take Rob's point that there are different markets for these stories. The internet crowd who analyse everything and are two steps ahead of the narrative all the time are different to the 'waiting for the trade' 'no-spoilers-please' crowd

or even the "What's this? A trade paperback with Green Lantern in it? I'll buy it, but it better be good!" crowd.
Alan M. said:
Dagwan said:
I don't see the White Lanterns as a cop-out at all.

It's a logical step that Johns double-faked us out on earlier in the series. If there is a being embodying death, it makes sense that there is one embodying life. If the being embodying death has a corps, the the being embodying life has one too. Sure, if Johns hadn't done the "combining all the colors" thing earlier in the series, every one of us would have seen it coming. He made the logical look illogical, to throw us all off.

Agreed. I mean, I haven't read the series, but strictly from a storytelling perspective, it's kind of where the story had to go. A pre-determined end-point isn't necessarily a cop-out; it just makes the story about the journey to get to there, and seeing what things look like once you're there. It's the difference between "How will this story end?" and "What will this story's end mean?" Some stories are more about the former; others more about the latter.

Agreed. Agreed. To me, there's a place for both driving action and twisting action. It's great to have a story that's always unexpected, like Busiek and then Nicieza's Thunderbolts. But it's also good to have a sense that the story is heading towards a specific confrontation. To paraphrase Dagwan, Geoff Johns got to the expected ending in an unexpected way, which was a double delight.
I think there's a difference between a satisfying story that springboards into new stories and an unfinished ending that only serves to set up future stories. I would put Blackest Night in the first category. It finished its story. And despite your assertion, Rob, we are mentioning some of the cool things that happened. In the other thread, Doc posted positively about the four-page spread. Here, we've complimented the way that the big twist was handled at the end. Mark mentioned the great art. But yeah, one of the cool things about Blackest Night was that it opened up the possibility for even more stories. I would put Secret Invasion in the latter story. The entire last issue was a series of small scenes setting up the new status quo for other series, while we were never really clear about the ending of that specific invasion.

Rob Staeger said:
Maybe satisfy isn't the right word, Figs -- I went off on a little tear there. But for monthly readers, the conclusion never packs as much punch as the swerve -- and when we get to Blackest Night 8, for instance, most of us aren't really talking about the white Lantern fight or anything that happened in the story -- except for the resurrections, which are springboards for the next story.

That's the cosmic treadmill we're on.

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