Thinking about the latest twists in the Thor saga, I thought about the Silver Age Thor so I was wondering--

  • when Odin deposited the newly created Don Blake in front of that medical college, did he think up a complete backstory for the guy, with paperwork and creditials? I know it was the 60s but you still had to have a college diploma to be a doctor!
  • Was it ever confirmed exactly what kind of doctor Blake was? He appeared to be a general practioner (gp) until he had to do complicated surgery.
  • Did Odin ever worry about Don Blake getting, well, killed somehow?
  • How long did it take for Thor's persona/memories to come back? In his first appearance, it was Blake transformed into Thor but soon, Thor's personality took over. It really was very similar to Bruce Banner and the Hulk.
  • Mjolnir was charmed that none but Thor could hold it but it wasn't super-heavy or else Thor would be crashing through the floor, among other things. But if he placed it inside a car, say, could you drive away with it, theoritically?
  • Did Thor truly love Jane Foster or was it Don Blake's emotions?
  • Did Thor have access to Don Blake's knowledge because sometimes the Thunder God seemed confused by technology/modern times?
  • And was Odin Thor's greatest foe or was there meaning to the All-Father's seeming madness?

 

 

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After all, peanuts are essentially a tropical or near-tropical plant, and so Norse gods would logically have had no taste for them.

Loki, the Trickster God, can't pretend to like whatever it is Thor throws out there for real pigeons to eat? He has to leave the scene immediately because he really doesn't much care for the taste of peanuts?

Loki, defeated by logic and his inability to deceive! No, not really seeing it.

Even if we grant this was a good plan, Kirby's shot of Thor throwing a bag of peanuts is just so darn dramatic! Kirby couldn't draw Thor combing his hair without it looking like Ragnarok was in the offing. That's how he rolled.

-- MSA

I dunno.  None of the Asgardians over the years have ever impressed me with their cerebral abilities, and I could easily see Loki being rumbled in this case because he didn't think it through.  Had he been a smarter trickster god of evil, he might well be enjoying peanuts on a beach on Hawaii today, or better still, come up with a plan to put his image on every peanut in the world so he could trademark them and...

Okay, maybe not. ;)

I agree that Thor's usual strategic plan is just north of "Thor Smash!" And for an all-seeing guy, Odin often comes across as if he's got his eye patch on the wrong eye. So being the Trickster God with this group may not be the highest accolade. 

Thor should've kept a few legumes in his pocket, so whenever Loki got on his high horse, he could rattle him by pulling one out and saying, "Care for a peanut? Maybe not."

-- MSA

I would pay to read THAT comic.  Maybe Dan Slott would be willing to write it?!  He has a nice touch with humor and Marvel continuity.

Mr. Silver Age said:

I agree  that Thor's usual strategic plan is just north of "Thor Smash!" And for an all-seeing guy, Odin often comes across as if he's got his eye patch on the wrong eye. So being the Trickster God with this group may not be the highest accolade. 

Thor should've kept a few legumes in his pocket, so whenever Loki got on his high horse, he could rattle him by pulling one out and saying, "Care for a peanut? Maybe not."

-- MSA

"HAH! My accursed half-brother shall NE'ER find me now, in the seeming guise of a harmless Central Park squirrel -- NAY!  Not AGAIN -- !"

Careful, Loki, Squirrel Girl took on Doctor Doom and won...

Don't mess with the Squirrel!

Ah, the sensational Squirrel Girl... :)

Regarding "did Thor love Jane?"  I find this from "The Grandeur and the Glory":  Jane is in the hospital on the edge of a nervous breakdown, and Dr. Blake says, "Jane! My darling!  I'll PROVE my love -- !  LOOK at me, Jane Foster!  I COMMAND you to look!" (Stamps the cane) "Forgive me, my father -- THIS is the only way!  Know you, now forever, that I am THOR, son of ODIN, god of thunder!!  'Tis an immortal of ASGARD whom you love, Jane Foster -- and who truly loves YOU, as well!"

Odin does not take this well.

I still feel that it was Blake who fell in love with Jane and his Thor side went along with it. Once Odin said that he could not be with her, Thor rebelled and fought to be with her. I wonder if Odin said "Sure, son. Whatever makes you happy!" that Thor would have lost interest soon enough. But then there was Sif waiting in the wings anyway...

In the 70s, they briefly found a way around the "Does Thor love Jane or Sif?" by having Jane turn into Sif, without a magic cane btw!

WTF?  They turned Jane Foster INTO Sif?  How does this work?  They were separate beings.

 

And, as I recall, in Thor #136, "To Become an Immortal".... Jane was tested and failed...when Sif arrived immediately afterward.

Kirk G said:

WTF?  They turned Jane Foster INTO Sif?  How does this work?  They were separate beings.

 

And, as I recall, in Thor #136, "To Become an Immortal".... Jane was tested and failed...when Sif arrived immediately afterward.

 

No worries, Kirk. Sit back and let the ol' Commander bring you up to speed . . . .

 

"To Become an Immortal", from The Mighty Thor# 136 (Jan., 1967), was Jane Foster's swan song as a regular in the Thor series.  When Jane failed the test to become one of the immortal Asgardians, papa Odin, that master manipulator, sent Jane back to Midgard, after first removing all of her memories of Thor and Asgard, and set her up for a romance with Doctor Keith Kincaid, a Don Blake lookalike.  And, as you mentioned, sneaky Odin also arranged a reunion of Thor with Sif.

 

 

That much you know.  Now for the part which you missed.

 

Eight real-time years later, in a three-part adventure---Thor # 229-31 (Nov., 1974 through Jan., 1975)---the Thunder God and Hercules take on a "shadow demon" which has been stealing the souls of various New York residents, causing them to go mad and ultimately commit suicide.  After defeating the demon, Thor learns that Jane Foster was one of the victims.  She's lying in a hospital, dying.

 

"Lo, the Raging Battle", Thor # 232 (Feb., 1975), kicks off a sub-plot that runs several issues.  Thor and Sif and Hercules are told by the doctors treating Jane that there is nothing medicine can do for her; she appears to have lost the will to live.

 

Thor is diverted by a battle with Firestorm, whom the Thunder God mistakenly believes is attacking Earth.  (He's actually come to warn Thor about a threat from Loki.)  Meanwhile, Sif and Hercules go to Asgard to request Odin's help in saving Jane's life.  Unfortunately, Odin is missing (another sub-plot); however, the valkyrie Hildegarde suggests that the mystic Runestaff of Kamo Tharnn, an interstellar scholar living in the Andromeda galaxy, will restore Jane Foster's soul.

 

Over the next several issues, while Thor tackles an invasion by Loki and an army of rogue Asgardians and then, an attack by the Absorbing Man, Sif and Hercules track down Kamo Tharnn, capture his Runestaff, and return to Earth.

 

The resolution to the Jane-is-dying plot comes to an end in "One Life to Give", from Thor # 236 (Jun., 1975).  With his super-hero chores out of the way, the Thunder God rushes back to Jane Foster's hospital bed, to find her hale and hearty.  Hercules is there, but Sif is not.  In order to save Jane's life, Sif used the magic of the Runestaff to merge her life-force with Jane's body.

 

With that, Jane Foster returns to the series as a regular character.  Over the course of several issues, hints are dropped that the essence of Sif still remains, inside of Jane, as she has become bolder, more adventurous.  She insists on accompanying Thor on many of his adventures and shows a heretofore-unseen fighting spirit.

 

After a real-time year, the truth is revealed in a two-part adventure in Thor # 248-9 (Jun. and Jul., 1976).  Thor and Jane deal with a revolution in Asgard, fomented because big daddy Odin seems to have gone mad.  Actually, it turns out that "Odin" is actually Mangog, an old Thor foe, in disguise.  During the big shebang, Jane wades into combat alongside the Asgardians, wielding Sif's sword.  When she accidentally strikes the blade against a wall, there's a burst of light, and she transforms into Sif!

 

Odin's vizier theorises that the two women actually share their form, and that, on Asgard, Sif is dominant.  He tells the Thunder God that, when they return to Earth, Sif will disappear and Jane will reappear.

 

It takes several months of plots for Thor and Sif to finally make it back to Midgard, but when they do, they discover that the vizier was wrong!  Sif remains Sif, with no explanation.

 

 

And there wouldn't be an explanation for seven years.  Right about the time when the current crop of Thor fans had forgotten that there ever was a Jane Foster---that is, if they ever knew of her in the first place---"Blood of a Goddess", from Thor # 332 (Jun., 1983), delivers a surprise.  The NYPD has been investigating the disappearance of Jane Foster, and at the insistance of Dr. Keith Kincaid, the boys from Homicide have centered their attention on Dr. Don Blake, suspecting him of having murdered her.

 

This kicks off another three-issue arc.  It begins when Don Blake reveals his secret identity to Dr. Kinkaid and tells him about the whole Jane-Sif-life-force thing.  Realising that Kamo Tharnn, the former possessor of the Runestaff, probably has the answer to the whole mess, Thor and Sif and Kinkaid travel to Tharnn's home world and confront him.

 

Eventually, the trio discover that, when the Runestaff transferred Sif's life-force into Jane, the actual body of Sif was transported to another dimension.  When Jane slammed Sif's sword against the wall, the influence of Asgard caused Sif and Jane to exchange places, trapping Jane in that other dimension for all these years.

 

The quest ends in Thor # 335 (Sep., 1983), with Our Heroes rescuing Jane from her other-worldly prison.  They then return to Earth and Jane marries Kinkaid, with Thor's blessing.

  

See what you miss when you skip a few issues?

OMG... what were those writers on?

First thought... is there any special significance to the the fact that each of these great resolutions come exactly 100 issues after each other?  136....236....335... (oh, alright...spot me one issue, will ya)

Second, this was only, what, two or three issues before the great revolution in Thor by Walt Simonson takes over?

Does this imply that when this arc ended... that it was two or three filler issues before Beta Ray Bill shows up and usrupts Thor's title??  Wasn't that in 337 or 338?

 

...Could it be argued that the " Larry issues" , and perhaasps a bit afterwards , of Thor in JIM happen at an early time in the MU.s history , previous to FF#1 , despite the (still??) Marvel continuity insistence that FF#1 was the Big Event ??? In what I rscall of John Byrne.s  mini Marvel The Lost Generation or whatever

Commander Benson said:

Kirk G said:

WTF?  They turned Jane Foster INTO Sif?  How does this work?  They were separate beings.

 

And, as I recall, in Thor #136, "To Become an Immortal".... Jane was tested and failed...when Sif arrived immediately afterward.

 

No worries, Kirk. Sit back and let the ol' Commander bring you up to speed . . . .

 

"To Become an Immortal", from The Mighty Thor# 136 (Jan., 1967), was Jane Foster's swan song as a regular in the Thor series.  When Jane failed the test to become one of the immortal Asgardians, papa Odin, that master manipulator, sent Jane back to Midgard, after first removing all of her memories of Thor and Asgard, and set her up for a romance with Doctor Keith Kincaid, a Don Blake lookalike.  And, as you mentioned, sneaky Odin also arranged a reunion of Thor with Sif.

 

 

That much you know.  Now for the part which you missed.

 

Eight real-time years later, in a three-part adventure---Thor # 229-31 (Nov., 1974 through Jan., 1975)---the Thunder God and Hercules take on a "shadow demon" which has been stealing the souls of various New York residents, causing them to go mad and ultimately commit suicide.  After defeating the demon, Thor learns that Jane Foster was one of the victims.  She's lying in a hospital, dying.

 

"Lo, the Raging Battle", Thor # 232 (Feb., 1975), kicks off a sub-plot that runs several issues.  Thor and Sif and Hercules are told by the doctors treating Jane that there is nothing medicine can do for her; she appears to have lost the will to live.

 

Thor is diverted by a battle with Firestorm, whom the Thunder God mistakenly believes is attacking Earth.  (He's actually come to warn Thor about a threat from Loki.)  Meanwhile, Sif and Hercules go to Asgard to request Odin's help in saving Jane's life.  Unfortunately, Odin is missing (another sub-plot); however, the valkyrie Hildegarde suggests that the mystic Runestaff of Kamo Tharnn, an interstellar scholar living in the Andromeda galaxy, will restore Jane Foster's soul.

 

Over the next several issues, while Thor tackles an invasion by Loki and an army of rogue Asgardians and then, an attack by the Absorbing Man, Sif and Hercules track down Kamo Tharnn, capture his Runestaff, and return to Earth.

 

The resolution to the Jane-is-dying plot comes to an end in "One Life to Give", from Thor # 236 (Jun., 1975).  With his super-hero chores out of the way, the Thunder God rushes back to Jane Foster's hospital bed, to find her hale and hearty.  Hercules is there, but Sif is not.  In order to save Jane's life, Sif used the magic of the Runestaff to merge her life-force with Jane's body.

 

With that, Jane Foster returns to the series as a regular character.  Over the course of several issues, hints are dropped that the essence of Sif still remains, inside of Jane, as she has become bolder, more adventurous.  She insists on accompanying Thor on many of his adventures and shows a heretofore-unseen fighting spirit.

 

After a real-time year, the truth is revealed in a two-part adventure in Thor # 248-9 (Jun. and Jul., 1976).  Thor and Jane deal with a revolution in Asgard, fomented because big daddy Odin seems to have gone mad.  Actually, it turns out that "Odin" is actually Mangog, an old Thor foe, in disguise.  During the big shebang, Jane wades into combat alongside the Asgardians, wielding Sif's sword.  When she accidentally strikes the blade against a wall, there's a burst of light, and she transforms into Sif!

 

Odin's vizier theorises that the two women actually share their form, and that, on Asgard, Sif is dominant.  He tells the Thunder God that, when they return to Earth, Sif will disappear and Jane will reappear.

 

It takes several months of plots for Thor and Sif to finally make it back to Midgard, but when they do, they discover that the vizier was wrong!  Sif remains Sif, with no explanation.

 

 

And there wouldn't be an explanation for seven years.  Right about the time when the current crop of Thor fans had forgotten that there ever was a Jane Foster---that is, if they ever knew of her in the first place---"Blood of a Goddess", from Thor # 332 (Jun., 1983), delivers a surprise.  The NYPD has been investigating the disappearance of Jane Foster, and at the insistance of Dr. Keith Kincaid, the boys from Homicide have centered their attention on Dr. Don Blake, suspecting him of having murdered her.

 

This kicks off another three-issue arc.  It begins when Don Blake reveals his secret identity to Dr. Kinkaid and tells him about the whole Jane-Sif-life-force thing.  Realising that Kamo Tharnn, the former possessor of the Runestaff, probably has the answer to the whole mess, Thor and Sif and Kinkaid travel to Tharnn's home world and confront him.

 

Eventually, the trio discover that, when the Runestaff transferred Sif's life-force into Jane, the actual body of Sif was transported to another dimension.  When Jane slammed Sif's sword against the wall, the influence of Asgard caused Sif and Jane to exchange places, trapping Jane in that other dimension for all these years.

 

The quest ends in Thor # 335 (Sep., 1983), with Our Heroes rescuing Jane from her other-worldly prison.  They then return to Earth and Jane marries Kinkaid, with Thor's blessing.

  

See what you miss when you skip a few issues?

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