Report what comic books you have read today--and tell us a little something about it while you're here!

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Ouch!

Wonderful! I have no doubt that you'll love them.

Richard Willis said:

Rob, thanks to your review I'm getting the collected editions of both Superman: Secret Identity and Batman: Creature of the Night.

Captain Comics said:

Quantum & Woody (2020) #1: The bloom is off the rose on this series for me, mainly because it's not written by Chrisopher Priest any more. But I still enjoy it occasionally. 

The premise, if you don't know, is that the two are step-brothers who are polar opposites and basically hate each other, but must stay together because of the nature of their super-powers. Each of them has Quantum Band on a wrist that gives them energy-based powers, but they have to stay in proximity and touch the bands together at least once every 24 hours (and yes, the sound effect is "Ktang," which the brothers occasionally use as a verb. "It's almost time to Ktang.") As you can see, it's a motley collection of bits culled from other series, but that's kinda the point, as it's a borderline satire of superheroes.

Quantum, for example, is a square-jawed, earnest superhero who is noble and self-sacrificing. Woody, on the other hand, is an irreverent con man and wastrel who is always provoking Quantum (and subtextually pointing out the absurdities of superhero conventions). There's also a goat, but I missed the series that introduced him/her/it and don't know why he/she/it is part of the cast now. But he/she/it is always there. (Quantum does goat yoga, so it's all good.) 

The series only really works when there's a writer good enough to deliver a cracking adventure yarn with good jokes but also a superhero satire, and very few can do that. Priest could, and made it look easy, but very few writers are at his level. Sometimes Woody's hi-jinks strike me as criminal and/or dangerous to others, but are presented as humorous, which takes me out of the story. Sometimes Quantum's consistent idealism comes across as single-minded stupidity (and the character isn't supposed to be stupid). And so forth. It's a trick to write Quantum & Woody well, and most Valiant writers -- many of whom are newcomers -- aren't up to it.

The current series is about midway between the ones I've liked and the ones I haven't. The art is a bit too much like a MAD parody than I'd prefer. If I was younger and more easily amused I'd probably follow it. As is, I'll wait for the next Quantum & Woody #1.

Cap, you have breathed life and fire into inchoate thoughts I've had on Quantum and Woody (and Quantum and Woody) since I first read those stories.

Initially, I enjoyed the contrast between straight-arrow Quantum and slacker Woody (despite my longstanding antipathy for whiny, useless slackers, but Woody doesn't whine). But one issue during the Christopher Priest run told us that Woody's slacker act was an act masking a painful childhood -- this was before the series was retconned to make Quantum and Woody stepbrothers; originally, as I recall, Woody was adopted -- and that made the whole thing a lot less fun to me. 

By the way, I've read the Secret Origin of The Goat, but don't remember a thing about it.

STAR TREK: PICARD: I bought the first three issues, read the first two. I decided to skip reading the rest, at this time, because I have no immediate plans to watch the series. (I may not watch it until it becomes available on DVD.) I will read the entire series at that time, otherwise I will forget it in the interim.

“This mini is co-written by one of the chief writers/producers on the TV show, and is considered canon.”

Regarding the canonicity of Star Trek comic books, they said that about the series which led into the last movie, too, but from what little I have seen of the show already, that lead-in comic book series has already been rendered non-canon. It remains “canon” only as long as they say it is.

"CAPTAIN AMERICA CREATED BY STAN LEE AND JACK KIRBY"

Yikes. I did not notice that.

PETER CANNON, THUNDERBOLT: WATCH: I don’t have this yet, but I have decided to get it.

THE DAILY BUGLE #1: I’d really like to hear Cap or Kelvin’s opinion of this series.

DICK TRACY: I’ve been reading the latest volume, which collects strips from 1972-73. The 1970s is generally regarded as Chester Gould’s weakest decade, and rightly so, but there are at least a few nuggets here. What Gould displays mostly here is his discomfort with transvestites and homosexuals, highlighting characters such as Girly Mac, “The Button:” and Hope Lezz. The continuities are short and lightweight, plus the comic relief character “Peanutbutter” is really annoying. Dick Tracy is easily the comic strip I have re-read most often over the years. I usually read it in its entirety (however much I own of it at a given time) at least once a decade. I completed my collection in the early 2Ks, so this is only the second time I have read these particular sequences. I have no recollection of Gould’s latent homophobia, but it jumps out at me now. My earliest specific memories of the Dick Tracy comic strip are from the 1970-71 Pouch/Mole sequence (as I mentioned before), but I have no childhood recollection of the strips contained in this volume whatsoever. (I didn’t even realize daily strips existed until 1976.) I think it was DC’s Dick Tracy treasury edition which got me started reading (and clipping) the strip regularly. More on that next time (next volume, I mean).

I know I read Dick Tracy during that period, but I have no recollection of "Peanut Butter" at all.

I am currently re-reading My Hero Academia.

"I know I read Dick Tracy during that period, but I have no recollection of "Peanut Butter" at all."

Homer Barley, apparent;ly intended to be the new "Junior."

Wow, Trayc looks as though he had badly-botched reconstructive surgery on his face, there.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"I know I read Dick Tracy during that period, but I have no recollection of "Peanut Butter" at all."

Homer Barley, apparent;ly intended to be the new "Junior."

Jeff, I read Star Trek: Picard — Countdown and am also watching the series.

First point: There are only three issues. What you see is what you get (so read that third issue).

Second point: I am watching the series, and yes, all of the comics series is canon so far. See my column on the subject. If there's some contradiction that I haven't seen, please tell me, so I will quit lying to people!

For some reason, one of the few things I remember from Dick Tracy during that period.

Jeff of Earth-J said:

"I know I read Dick Tracy during that period, but I have no recollection of "Peanut Butter" at all."

Homer Barley, apparent;ly intended to be the new "Junior."

I am currently re-reading My Hero Academia: Vigilantes

The Baron said:

I am currently re-reading My Hero Academia.

Cap, I've read the first 3 issues of Undiscovered Country. I too was underwhelmed by the series. I was hoping for more of a political sci-fi adventure, and instead its more post-apocalyptic. But what threw me out was once they are started mentioning the prophecy. I'm prophecied out. I think its kind of a writer's cop out now. If there is a prophecy involved the rest of the story better "WOW!" me. I think I'm committed to one more issues since I pre-order everything, but then I am done. 

As far me:

Over My Dead Body - this graphic novel is the sequel to Jay Faerber's series Near Death. That series ended with Markham the hit-man going to jail. Here is still in jail, but a crooked warden promises him, that he will be released on parole, if he agrees to find out what happaned to his daughter. She ran off with some ex-con. This is a fast-paced and fun story. If you liked Near Death, then you definitely should check this out. If you aren't familiar with the story, it is laid out in the first few pages of this book. Hell, on the back cover. Markham had a near death experience and he swore to save a life for everyone he took, and to not kill again. Kind of hokey, but I liked it, and thought it worked.

Shock vol. 2 - This is an anthology hardcover from Aftershock. Mostly, horror stories, but not all. Usually anthologies have a lot of ups and downs. For me there wasn't a clunker in the bunch. I thought they were all good to great. Garth Ennis' war story was probably my favorite. With honorable mention to "Ultimus" and "Man, I'm, Evil Dude" My least favorite was "Flaming Carrot", just a little too weird. Again none were bad. A lot of great stories here.

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